Vatican buries the hatchet with Charles Darwin
#71
LaRoza Wrote:
alaric Wrote:You were there.....?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_pur_si_muove!

Quote:Actually it will never be proven either way if Galileo ever uttered under breath " E pur si muove", after his recanting during the Inquisition and under the threat of heresy which could have been punishable by death at that time.

But part of Galileo's defense was of St Augustine himself declaring not to take certain scripture too literally, especially in books of poetry and song.

Wrong. He would not have been executed under the laws of the time.
Thank God we no longer live under the "laws of that time".
Never the less, the Earth does indeed move around the Sun, which is close to the center of the Solar System (not the universe) or do you actually don't believe that regardless of what modern science has shown as factual?
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#72
alaric Wrote:Thank God we no longer live under the "laws of that time".
What are you talking about? The laws said he could not be tortured or executed. Those are good laws I think.

Quote:Never the less, the Earth does indeed move around the Sun, which is close to the center of the Solar System (not the universe) or do you actually don't believe that regardless of what modern science has shown as factual?

The earth does not move, except relative to the Sun. Movement is relative. How fast is the earth moving? Relative to me, it is not moving at all. Relative to the sun it is moving 29.658 km /s. Relative to the centre of the Milky Way 220 km/s and relative to Andromeda: 120 km/s. Also, the furthest most objects we can see are moving quite faster away from us, and our movement relative to them is just as fast as theirs. So, what is the standard to which we compare movement?
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#73
LaRoza Wrote:
alaric Wrote:Thank God we no longer live under the "laws of that time".
What are you talking about? The laws said he could not be tortured or executed. Those are good laws I think.

Quote:Never the less, the Earth does indeed move around the Sun, which is close to the center of the Solar System (not the universe) or do you actually don't believe that regardless of what modern science has shown as factual?

The earth does not move, except relative to the Sun. Movement is relative. How fast is the earth moving? Relative to me, it is not moving at all. Relative to the sun it is moving 29.658 km /s. Relative to the centre of the Milky Way 220 km/s and relative to Andromeda: 120 km/s. Also, the furthest most objects we can see are moving quite faster away from us, and our movement relative to them is just as fast as theirs. So, what is the standard to which we compare movement?
Actually, I messed up reading your post, I thought you wrote that he would have ben executed under the laws of the time, but there was capital punishment for heresy back in them days, was there not?

I'm not going to go into a whole discussion on how relative it is to us whether the Earth is moving or not, the fact is it does move and Galileo was onto to that 5oo yrs ago in which he turned out to be more or less correct in his assumptions . This whole controversy about the inquisition and heresy charges being brought against one of the most brilliant minds of the Renaissance I believe is a black mark on the Church's history, although I will admit there is a lot more to the story than history would have us believe and anti-Catholics and atheists love to bring up the Galileo example when they want to slam the Church and it's effects on Western culture.

I believe from what I have read about the situation is that the whole drama could have been avoided if it wasn't for the vanity of a thin-skinned Pope and an arrogant, stubborn, brilliant astronomer/scientist.
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#74
alaric Wrote:...but there was capital punishment for heresy back in them days, was there not?

Of course.

Formal heresy was a capital crime in Catholic Europe up until very recently. For instance, in Spain it was only abolished in the mid 19th Century when the country started his suicidal course en route to liberalism and apostasy.
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#75
alaric Wrote:Actually, I messed up reading your post, I thought you wrote that he would have ben executed under the laws of the time, but there was capital punishment for heresy back in them days, was there not?
Yes, but he was too old.

Quote:I'm not going to go into a whole discussion on how relative it is to us whether the Earth is moving or not, the fact is it does move and Galileo was onto to that 5oo yrs ago in which he turned out to be more or less correct in his assumptions .
But he wasn't. The Church did not mind science, only when it opposed the what the Church had thought had been revealed. The Church was going by what scripture seemed to say, and Galileo could not prove his idea so it was a baseless attack on the Church. Kepler could prove it and show it using science, and he did not get in trouble for it. Kepler and Galileo were doing this at the same time, so Galileo was not only inferior in science to Kepler, Galileo also pissed off the Church in the process.

Quote: This whole controversy about the inquisition and heresy charges being brought against one of the most brilliant minds of the Renaissance I believe is a black mark on the Church's history, although I will admit there is a lot more to the story than history would have us believe and anti-Catholics and atheists love to bring up the Galileo example when they want to slam the Church and it's effects on Western culture.

I believe from what I have read about the situation is that the whole drama could have been avoided if it wasn't for the vanity of a thin-skinned Pope and an arrogant, stubborn, brilliant astronomer/scientist.

But thing is about this instance was that Galileo already rejected the true science for his idea. If you study his ideas on the matter, you'll find them quite unscientific and worthless.
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