Friedrich Nietzsche
#1
http://www.traditioninaction.org/religio...Alvear.htm
 

 
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#2
Great article. [Image: tiphat2.gif]

It has been said that the crazy philosopher dies as a nobody, but in 100 years, he is king and rules the world. 
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#3
[Image: NietzscheCart.jpg]

How one longs from an explanation from Freud for this photo.
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#4
The article is very good, although I think it's important to not that his insanity seemed to be congenital.
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#5
Happyandgrateful Wrote:The article is very good, although I think it's important to not that his insanity seemed to be congenital.

Actually the dominant theory is he contracted syphilis from a prostitute in his 20's, but the causes of his physical illnesses and ultimate collapse will never be known for sure. The test of syphilis was developed 10 years after he died.

Quote:How one longs from an explanation from Freud for this photo.

Ask and ye shall receive... well, I'm not Freud.
But I did do a psychoanalytic investigation of Nietzsche last semester. My paper is (self) published here
The photo should be explained by the paper fairly well since I centered on the relationship between Nietzsche and Lou Salome (the woman in the photo).
I based the paper on Irvin Yalom's novel, When Nietzsche Wept which is very entertaining if you like psychology, the history of philosophy and such things
If you are interested in Lou Salome, she became a psychoanalyst of some note in the early 20th century so there is plenty of secondary literature on her. The one I cite in the paper is Rudolph Binion's Frau Lou (1968)

As for his philosophy, Nietzsche stands at the root of one branch of post-modernism - the deconstructionist. His perspectivism and focus on power relationships undergrids their denial of coherent narrative and ultimately arrives at a complete nihilism.
At the root of the other postmodernism (Radical Orthodoxy), stands Kierkegaard, whom I've often thought of the anti-Nietzsche. I always wondered how would the world be different if Kierkegaard wrote in German.


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#6
Many doubt he had syphilis.

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/philosophy/jn...Syph.shtml

Here are letters from the period when he was sinking into insanity:

http://www.geocities.com/thenietzschecha...etters.htm
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#7
Quote:
Actually the dominant theory is he contracted syphilis from a prostitute in his 20's, but the causes of his physical illnesses and ultimate collapse will never be known for sure. The test of syphilis was developed 10 years after he died.

Actually, there is some credible refutation of the syphilis thing (I used to be a Humanities major).  I definitely can't go into the reading I've done, but his father suffered from some sort of neurological state that was similar -- it also seemed that Nietzche was too much of a misogynist (sp?) to visit prostitutes.

The thing is, as Catholics, we need to be able to refute the ideology that people like Nietzsche espouse, without simply depending on their moral deviancy, or holding on to the intellectually infantile arguments of certain Catholics.  It isn't for everyone to engage in philosophical debate with the liberal, moral nihilist intelligentsia (it's increasingly not my modus operandi), but some Catholics need to do it.

What TIA is doing is very important, because when I graduated college, their was a whole school of Nietzsche rehabilitation that sought to portray Nietzsche as something he was not (ie: an egalitarian, contemplative, moral force, etc).
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#8
Nietzsche is great stuff. He is the only honest atheist that I've ever read. Anyone who hasn't picked up his work needs to do so in order to understand modernity.
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#9
Good article from TIA. Nietzsche was one of the heralds of the Revolution, no doubt. Look at the adulation college teachers and students have for him, it's sickening.
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#10
I read him many years ago, and concluded he was insane before I discovered he ended his days in a mental asylum.
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