Mass for all time returns to the newman center UofT
#21
no plm. Dont get me started.
sip sip
edit to add: my opinion of the newman center at uofT could change if we were permitted to sip fine drink (say only Trappist or charterhouse thirst crunchers). as we chatted in the oakrooom after the return of the mass for all time. i could even post a review in the fishtank......
just sayin
sip sip
i wanted it brought up during some meetings but
sigh sigh

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#22
devotedknuckles Wrote:if only all the pews faced the alter and the alter was in its proper place instead its been rearranged in a 3 sided pews facing each other which a huge holy water font in the middle. only one set of pews faces the alter and there are no kneelers. (when i attended daily n.o. being brain washed as any fine student  i loved that most about the chapel.)
sip sip!

The holy water font in the middle is something I've never heard of before.

My cathedral got a pretty bad wreckovation too, recently. One thing that changed was the pews being arranged so that, like the place you described, the center pews are facing front but the left and right are facing each other. Hard to say about what's a "proper" pew arrangement, though. Catholics adopted the custom of pews from the Protestant sects, and they didn't become widespread until the 18th century. Some great cathedrals even today are entirely pew-less.

You can see in various images where cathedrals had/have box seats facing one another, kind of like how choir stalls face one another.


Coronation of Napoleon I and Josephine at Notre-Dame, with box seats facing inward (including the Empress Mother, although in reality she was not present at the event)

In fact, the whole event was arranged with seats facing inward.

[Image: PJC03030_031.jpg]


Coronation of Charles X at Reims, with women in box seats like the previous example


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#23
I'm not a pew lover. and that style of pew layout in a huge cathedral maybe might work but not in a small chapel it is a very small chapel even smaller because of the absurd layout of the pews and tub of holy water right between them in front of the alter at the mid point. its absurd!!!

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#24
devotedknuckles Wrote:I'm not a pew lover. and that style of pew layout in a huge cathedral maybe might work but not in a small chapel it is a very small chapel even smaller because of the absurd layout of the pews and tub of holy water right between them in front of the alter at the mid point. its absurd!!!

Hmm, yeah, gotta agree with you about the tub thing. I'm guessing it was placed that way out of some post-Vatican II notion of placing the font of baptism in the center and have everyone look in its direction to emphasize the community, blah blah blah.

But on traditional principles, it wouldn't be a bad arrangement. If the nave was clear and the people were sitting in a small chapel in choir stalls facing each other, it'd be great. Especially if it was men on one side and women on the other. The singing of the Mass and Office would be just like in monastic communities. A cozy arrangement like in this quire would be excellent.
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#25
The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
devotedknuckles Wrote:I'm not a pew lover. and that style of pew layout in a huge cathedral maybe might work but not in a small chapel it is a very small chapel even smaller because of the absurd layout of the pews and tub of holy water right between them in front of the alter at the mid point. its absurd!!!

Hmm, yeah, gotta agree with you about the tub thing. I'm guessing it was placed that way out of some post-Vatican II notion of placing the font of baptism in the center and have everyone look in its direction to emphasize the community, blah blah blah.

But on traditional principles, it wouldn't be a bad arrangement. If the nave was clear and the people were sitting in a small chapel in choir stalls facing each other, it'd be great. Especially if it was men on one side and women on the other. The singing of the Mass and Office would be just like in monastic communities. A cozy arrangement like in this quire would be excellent.

Actually, there are a couple of churches like that in our diocese, HK.  The two I can immediately recall to mind appear to be fairly recently built.  It's a rather hideous and community-centric arrangement, and the Blessed Sacrament is kept out of sight.

And while I agree that there's nothing inherently wrong with a choir-stall arrangement (i.e. opposite sides of the congregation facing each other), I have to say that I don't think it works outside of religious communities.  This is for the simple reason that your typical lay-folk haven't mastered custody of the eyes.  Also, religious communities are typically single-sex, so there is no temptation to check out the the attractive person of the opposite sex across the way.  Having some experience in sitting in choirs for a few years of my life, I can tell you that most of the time, you're trying your best not to make awkward eye-contact with your brothers in the opposite choir, which can be rather distracting.  Most of the time, I'd have my nose buried in my Liber/Office/Missal, looking at the altar or altar cross, or just keeping my eyes closed.
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#26
rbjmartin Wrote:Actually, there are a couple of churches like that in our diocese, HK.  The two I can immediately recall to mind appear to be fairly recently built.  It's a rather hideous and community-centric arrangement, and the Blessed Sacrament is kept out of sight.

And while I agree that there's nothing inherently wrong with a choir-stall arrangement (i.e. opposite sides of the congregation facing each other), I have to say that I don't think it works outside of religious communities.  This is for the simple reason that your typical lay-folk haven't mastered custody of the eyes.  Also, religious communities are typically single-sex, so there is no temptation to check out the the attractive person of the opposite sex across the way.  Having some experience in sitting in choirs for a few years of my life, I can tell you that most of the time, you're trying your best not to make awkward eye-contact with your brothers in the opposite choir, which can be rather distracting.  Most of the time, I'd have my nose buried in my Liber/Office/Missal, looking at the altar or altar cross, or just keeping my eyes closed.

That's a good point about the " temptation to check out the the attractive person of the opposite sex across the way".

Anyway, I just intended to point out that there's some precedent in the "Parliament style" of seating.
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#27
Marisa Wrote:Wonderful news! Fr. Venette used to travel to my city (Kitchener) to offer the TLM when he was still at Queen of Angels in St. Catharines.
Dauphin: Any idea where the new parish will be?

Father recently got news that it would be somewhere in the east end. It makes sense, since the rest of the TLMs are clustered in Etobicoke. He says the Archbishop plans at least 6 daily TLMs to be spread out around Toronto (not including, I assume, the SSPX).
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#28
interesting. besides the society and the oratorians no one else offers daily TLM. does the fssp offer public daily TLM? ye sit makes sense re the east end i do believe Scarborough has a TLM is is that a latin NO?
if your gonna be there daulphin me and the bhoys are plannin on some pints after the oak room   closes at um 9. pm me. have we met?


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#29
devotedknuckles Wrote:interesting. besides the society and the oratorians no one else offers daily TLM. does the fssp offer public daily TLM? ye sit makes sense re the east end i do believe Scarborough has a TLM is is that a latin NO?
if your gonna be there daulphin me and the bhoys are plannin on some pints after the oak room   closes at um 9. pm me. have we met?

Yes, there's a daily TLM at Holy Cross (Here's the schedule: http://www.fssptoronto.com/) . That Mass, and the Sunday TLM at St. Therese Church will be replaced by the Masses at the new FSSP parish. The Fraternity will also send a couple more priests, so liturgical life should really be enriched.

Unfortunately, I can't make it to the Mass on the 20th. I have a chant workshop to attend here in Kingston.

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