no confession on ash wenesday?
#11
The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
dakotamidnight Wrote:FWIW it was St Mary's Downtown {on St. Mary's street}. And WOW they should totally have the TLM there - the church is perfect for it! Still has the altar rail even!

Alas, I've never actually been inside, although I walked right past it last night during Mardi Gras.

Last year on Maundy Thursday, St. Mary's Downtown was the second-to-last of my stops on the "seven church visitation" custom, but by the time I got there, it was past midnight and closed. I prayed a couple of stations from the Stations of the Cross, and disturbed some bum that was sleeping under the portal.

you should totally go because it is beautiful. Tons of wonderful Statues of the saints, stained glass windows, and a beautiful altar. The priest is pretty good too. Not super trad though
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#12
I was at Saint Joseph downtown San Antonio today for Mass at noon and went to confession before Mass started. No problem there...and the line was fairly long. Mass was packed.

It also is a beautiful historical church (I was in town for a conference)...but had no alter rail and they place the tabernacle way on the side (placing fern plants on the high alter) kinda taking away from the whole historical thing.
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#13
40Days Wrote:I was at Saint Joseph downtown San Antonio today for Mass at noon and went to confession before Mass started. No problem there...and the line was fairly long. Mass was packed.

It also is a beautiful historical church (I was in town for a conference)...but had no alter rail and they place the tabernacle way on the side (placing fern plants on the high alter) kinda taking away from the whole historical thing.

I knew I should have went there! - I flipped a coin as to which to go to {St Joseph's or St Mary's}

The big reason I went to downtown for my ashes was to go to confession, so it was a let down when they didn't have it as then I also didn't get to receive our Lord in the Eucharist


If you don't mind me asking - was the priest doing confession good? I've been looking for a good confessor that I can get to on a regular basis during the week when I'm free.
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#14
dakotamidnight Wrote:I knew I should have went there! - I flipped a coin as to which to go to {St Joseph's or St Mary's}

The big reason I went to downtown for my ashes was to go to confession, so it was a let down when they didn't have it as then I also didn't get to receive our Lord in the Eucharist


If you don't mind me asking - was the priest doing confession good? I've been looking for a good confessor that I can get to on a regular basis during the week when I'm free.

I used to go to St. Josephs downtown.  That also used to be my regular confession spot.  Sometimes I still go there for confession if I miss the earlier 9am confession after the TLM on Saturdays.

Fr. Tom is the pastor of St. Joseph's.  What I liked about him is that he is quick and to the point.  Even if there is a long line, you can usually still get in for confession.  If you are looking for a long, drawn out conversation with the priest with an even longer spiritual guidance, you will not find it there.  BTW, this is one of my pet peeves.  Sin and number of times people!  If you want to chat with the priest...make an appointment.

St. Joseph's is a very beautiful historical church that still has a high altar.  Just a few changes and the place would be perfect for the TLM.



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#15
My parish is 'conspicuously' orthodox (conspicuous under our Cardinal Archbishop Mahoney) and has a surfeit of priests (since it's been handed over to an order) and they too were unable to offer 'much' in the way of confession this year. This parish being a *heavily* Mexican and Central American neighborhood had massive queues for ashes and it took several priests (+lay) to handle the lines around the block for hours (let in group by group for Liturgy of the Word).

They had confession, but after readings and a homily the priests would dash out of the confessionals to join their colleague behind the altar rail and wash, rinse, repeat. Confession was challenging.

It's too bad, a good confession is a great start to the season...

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#16
When you think about it, it is quite ridiculous for priests to offer 3-4 masses on Ash Wednesday (not a Holy Day of obligation), but yet fail to offer confessions.

The true purpose of Ash Wednesday is repentance and thus confession should be showcased and first priority. Distribution of ashes (a mere sacramental) should be second priority. Have a day mass and one evening mass and schedule a long period of confession times.

To have Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, and no confessions is pretty absurd. I too was unable to get to confession yesterday as no parish anywhere around me offered any. They were too busy having, in some cases, up to FOUR masses/ ash distribution services. Priorities are completely flipped.

I suppose if one dies and goes to Hell due to lack of available confessions, they can at least take solace in knowing they received their ashes before burning for eternity...
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#17
StevusMagnus Wrote:When you think about it, it is quite ridiculous for priests to offer 3-4 masses on Ash Wednesday (not a Holy Day of obligation), but yet fail to offer confessions.

The true purpose of Ash Wednesday is repentance and thus confession should be showcased and first priority. Distribution of ashes (a mere sacramental) should be second priority. Have a day mass and one evening mass and schedule a long period of confession times.

To have Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, and no confessions is pretty absurd. I too was unable to get to confession yesterday as no parish anywhere around me offered any. They were too busy having, in some cases, up to FOUR masses/ ash distribution services. Priorities are completely flipped.

I suppose if one dies and goes to Hell due to lack of available confessions, they can at least take solace in knowing they received their ashes before burning for eternity...

Unfortunately, that shows a lack of priority in today's age.  Schedule as many Masses as possible (a good thing) with as many EMHC's as possible (not a good thing) with as limited times for Confession as possible (a horrendous thing).
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#18
Stevus, have a heart. Ash Wednesday is one of the busiest days for priests. Like you said, there are often four Masses and they are long Masses because of the distribution of ashes. A Lenten Penance Service (for long confessions) is usually held at least once during Lent.. And people can always go to confession every Saturday or any time by appointment.  - Lisa
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#19
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:Stevus, have a heart. Ash Wednesday is one of the busiest days for priests. Like you said, there are often four Masses and they are long Masses because of the distribution of ashes. A Lenten Penance Service (for long confessions) is usually held at least once during Lent.. And people can always go to confession every Saturday or any time by appointment.  - Lisa

But why is it one of the busiest days for priests? Because they are running around saying multiple masses and distributing ashes. But why? This is not a Holy Day of obligation. The point of the day is penance, turning from sin, mortification, etc. Confession should be top priority on this day.

Priests should be "busy" in the confessional to kick off the penitential season of Lent. Not off distributing ashes 4 times that day and cancelling confessions.
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#20
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:Stevus, have a heart. Ash Wednesday is one of the busiest days for priests. Like you said, there are often four Masses and they are long Masses because of the distribution of ashes. A Lenten Penance Service (for long confessions) is usually held at least once during Lent.. And people can always go to confession every Saturday or any time by appointment.  - Lisa

I can understand regarding Ash Wednesday, although that's not a Holy Day of Obligation.  But why should the Sacrament of Confession, one of our most important sacraments, be limited to Saturdays or by appointments?   I can understand if a priest has to take care of more than one parish (not unusual in states like Montana or Alaska), but if metropolitan areas where there are multiple parishes, with (hopefully) a couple of priests available per parish, Confession should be offered daily, even if only 20-30 minutes per day instead of the choice between Saturdays or appointments.

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