no confession on ash wenesday?
#31
Here's what it boils down to on Ash Wednesday: what's more important: the sacramental (ash), or the Sacrament (Confession)?
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#32
LRThunder Wrote:Here's what it boils down to on Ash Wednesday: what's more important: the sacramental (ash), or the Sacrament (Confession)?

Indeed. Sadly a lot of parishes would rather distribute ashes 4 times that day than hear 30 minutes of confessions.
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#33
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:Once again, there is a day for ashes and a day for penance. Ash Wednesday is both - and the entire season of Lent is one of penance and therefore confessions can be made any time throughout the season. There is only ONE DAY for the distribution of ashes. And it's important.
- Lisa


Excellently put Lisa [Image: waytogo.gif]

StevusMagnus Wrote:The schedules are self-imposed. There is no requirement for them to offer any masses that day, much less 4. I'm saying the priorities are out of whack. If people can "squeeze in" a non-obligtory mass, they can "squeeze in" confession as well. Especially since it is the whole point of the season.

Instead people and priests are caught up in saying 3-4 masses or "liturgy of the word" in some cases for a simple sacramental that is symbolic. And in the process they wipe the schedule of any confessions, which is a sacrament where one goes from spiritual death to life! It's really insanity when you think about it. 

Actually Stevus, the schedules are imposed by the faithful who want to begin Lent by assisting at Holy Mass, or a Prayer Service, and receive blessed ashes.  The priests are doing it because it's what the people in their parish expect them to do.  The multiple times are readily justifiable by people's schedules: an early before work Mass, the usual daily Mass with the blue hair crowd (which no priest who has any consideration for either his physical or spiritual health would dare tamper with), a mid morning Mass for the parochial school, perhaps a noon Mass or service for folks on their lunch hour, an after work Mass.  In rual areas a priest may have 2 or 3 parishes or missions to attend to.  In many parishes, at least in the west, there may be Masses in other languages (Spanish and Vietnamese being the most common ~yeah, I know, many think it should just be in Latin, but the priests have to deal with current reality).  In many parishes, multiple services are required to accommodate the number of people, as they couldn't all fit in the Church at one time, as a previous poster mentioned.  Services are also held at nursing homes and retirement centers, for people who can't get out - it's one day a year, and it's important!

To mark the beginning of Lent, the reception of ashes is the ancient practice of the Church (Catholic Encyclopedia article).  The reason that "a lot of parishes would rather distribute ashes 4 times that day than hear 30 minutes of confessions" is because that is what the church has always done - distribute ashes at as many times as necessary to accommodate the faithful.  I'm sure that almost every parish that held Ash Wednesday services also provided regularly scheduled opportunity for Confession the preceding Saturday, and, as Lisa pointed out, they will almost all (in my experience) provide many opportunities for Confession, at different times, throughout Lent, and they will make the extra effort to bring in visiting priests, for those who are more comfortable going to a priest who doesn't know them - and the priests will be busy extending the same courtesy to neighboring parishes.

If your complaint is against the Ordinary Form parishes in your area, what about the SSPX you attend?

Being just 2-1/2 years shy of my 6th. decade of being a Roman Catholic, a third of those years being before the changes of VII (and those years being in your beloved 1950's) - I've never thought of Confession as being THE WAY to begin Lent (one took on a penitential spirit and received blessed ashes in a solemn ceremony to begin Lent).  Lent was an excellent time to reflect, pray, and prepare oneself to make a really good Confession (or good Confessions) as part of one's Easter Duty.

[Edited for spelling]

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#34
Carthusian Wrote:
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
Carthusian Wrote:Ash Wednesday is one of those days that brings people to church who usually don't go.  The more Masses...the more collections.

Well, that's a cynical way of looking at it. I didn't know there was a collection taken up on Ash Wednesday. We had four Masses.. Zero collections.

- Lisa


Unfortunately, many parishes are in need of cash.  Pastors know Ash Wednesday is a big turnout day.  The TLM Ash Wednesday Mass I went to took two collections.  When I used to go the NO, I don't remember an Ash Wednesday Mass where collections were not taken.


They must do things way differntly in Texas.  To use my I'm only 2-1/2 years shy of my 6th. decade of being a Roman Catholic line again, I've never seen or heard of a collection being taken at any Mass not on a Sunday or Holy Day of obligation, with the exception of Parish Missions, where a collection might be taken as a stipend for the priest who gave the Mission, or his Order.  In fact, up here in Washington in many parishes Christmas may be the only Holy Day that has a collection (can't miss out on those C&E Catholics [Image: laff.gif]), and the people who come to Mass on the other Holy Days are probable regular supporters of the parish anyway.
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#35
StevusMagnus Wrote:Priests should be "busy" in the confessional to kick off the penitential season of Lent. Not off distributing ashes 4 times that day and cancelling confessions.

A failure to prepare on our part does not constitute an emergency on the priest's part.  Catholics should be "busy" in the confessional all year long.  If they were, limited confession on Ash Wednesday wouldn't be a big deal.  Instead everyone who still hasn't fully apostasized goes "Oh crap, it's Lent" and tries to jam in there because they neglect going on a regular basis.

Usually, there is plenty of opportunity for Confession during Lent.  You won't go to hell because you aren't in a state of Sanctifying Grace on Ash Wednesday.  You go to hell because you aren't in a state of Sanctifying Grace on any day of the year.  Which makes my point - the problem isn't priests giving Ashes as they should be doing; the problem is people not going to Confession regularly.

Hey, if Ash Wednesday wakes people up, that's great.  But it doesn't mean the Church has to kiss our asses because we suddenly decided to get with the program.
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#36
Actually, confessions are traditionally done on the two days prior to Ash Wednesday, called Shrove Monday and Shrove Tuesday (also Fat Tuesday). The word "shrove" comes from "shriving" of one's sins, i.e. confessing. Of course, in medieval times, people generally had specific days of the year for confession since it wasn't as frequent as post-Tridentine times (but still more frequent than the average NO Catholic of today).

Wikipedia Wrote:The word shrove is the past tense of the English verb shrive, which means to obtain absolution for one's sins by way of Confession and doing penance. Thus Shrove Tuesday gets its name from the shriving that English Christians were expected to do prior to receiving absolution immediately before Lent begins.
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#37
StevusMagnus Wrote:
Carthusian Wrote:Unfortunately, many parishes are in need of cash.  Pastors know Ash Wednesday is a big turnout day.  The TLM Ash Wednesday Mass I went to took two collections.  When I used to go the NO, I don't remember an Ash Wednesday Mass where collections were not taken.
Aha! I think you hit the nail on the head! There is indeed a first priority. The almighty dollar.

Both of you guys are being ridiculous.
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#38
QuisUtDeus Wrote:A failure to prepare on our part does not constitute an emergency on the priest's part.  Catholics should be "busy" in the confessional all year long.
Catholics should be "busy" at mass all year long as well.

Quote:If they were, limited confession on Ash Wednesday wouldn't be a big deal.  Instead everyone who still hasn't fully apostasized goes "Oh crap, it's Lent" and tries to jam in there because they neglect going on a regular basis.

Speculation. "Limited"? Try none. What better way to start off the prime penitential season of Lent than with confession? I'm simply saying HAVE confessions. Offer them instead of 2 extra Masses on a day that is not obligatory to attend Mass. You are setting up the false proposition that it is either or.


Quote:Usually, there is plenty of opportunity for Confession during Lent. 

There's plenty of opportunity for Mass during Lent as well.

Quote:You won't go to hell because you aren't in a state of Sanctifying Grace on Ash Wednesday.  You go to hell because you aren't in a state of Sanctifying Grace on any day of the year.  Which makes my point - the problem isn't priests giving Ashes as they should be doing; the problem is people not going to Confession regularly.

Nobody is arguing that Catholics shouldn't confess frequently. They shouyld go to Mass regularly too. That doesn't mean we shouldn't have zero masses on Ash Wednesday, just as it means we shouldn't have zero confessions on Ash Wednesday. The point is that the season of penance being kicked off with no penance and multiple distribution of sacramentals is wacky.

Quote:Hey, if Ash Wednesday wakes people up, that's great.  But it doesn't mean the Church has to kiss our asses because we suddenly decided to get with the program.


Right. The Church doesn't have to kiss our asses by providing "Ash Wednesday" Catholics with 4 ash distribution services. Instead they should allow these Catholics the opportunity to get straight with God and come home and repent on Ash Wednesday through the sacrament of Penance. They need to get priorities straight. The apostates need confession before they need ashes.
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#39
QuisUtDeus Wrote:
StevusMagnus Wrote:
Carthusian Wrote:Unfortunately, many parishes are in need of cash.  Pastors know Ash Wednesday is a big turnout day.  The TLM Ash Wednesday Mass I went to took two collections.  When I used to go the NO, I don't remember an Ash Wednesday Mass where collections were not taken.
Aha! I think you hit the nail on the head! There is indeed a first priority. The almighty dollar.

Both of you guys are being ridiculous.

The only thing ridiculous is denying the fact that confessions should be offered on Ash Wednesday in favor of a sacramental.
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#40
The_Harlequin_King Wrote:Actually, confessions are traditionally done on the two days prior to Ash Wednesday, called Shrove Monday and Shrove Tuesday (also Fat Tuesday). The word "shrove" comes from "shriving" of one's sins, i.e. confessing. Of course, in medieval times, people generally had specific days of the year for confession since it wasn't as frequent as post-Tridentine times (but still more frequent than the average NO Catholic of today).

Wikipedia Wrote:The word shrove is the past tense of the English verb shrive, which means to obtain absolution for one's sins by way of Confession and doing penance. Thus Shrove Tuesday gets its name from the shriving that English Christians were expected to do prior to receiving absolution immediately before Lent begins.


No confessions on Monday or Tuesday either anywhere around me.
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