Number of US Catholics declines by 398,000
#11
Quote: Your response was rational

Shhh! Don't let my wife find out! [Image: laff.gif]
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#12
The LDS Church is actually in decline. More members ask to have their names removed from the rolls (and left ALONE) than are baptized - even with all of their children.

While we are closing parishes, the LDS are closing whole stakes (our equivalent of a diocese) are being merged due to rapidly declining membership and operating costs. They are selling more churches than they are building. This is true even in the strongholds of Utah, Arizona and Idaho. I understand it is even worse in Europe, South America and the US East Coast.

The Internet is killing their missionary efforts. The "investigators" are learning more about their church than the missionaries can even handle the questions.
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#13
Ockham Wrote:Hopefully, those were 67 million 'bad' Catholics. 


Thats what I was hoping, but they seem to stay on hoping to destroy "reform" the Church from within. It could be lots of things it could be 67 million young Catholics who don't care anymore. Or neo-cons who drifted off to more high church Churches like Anglo Catholics/Eastern Orthodox.
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#14
I'm surprised the Jehovah's Witnesses are up.  I rarely see them out on the streets anymore, and I've met more ex-JW's or inactive ones than practicing JW's.  On the other hand, I have noticed that all of the local "Kingdom Halls" have signs in English and Spanish; their numbers must be up because they prey heavily on poor, ignorant Hispanic immigrants. 

Notice also that the most liberal denominations--Episcopal and United Church of Christ (Obama's sect) had the biggest declines.  The Southern Baptists have become more conservative in the past few years, and many of their more "moderate" congregations split off.  Baptist congregations are really self-governing anyway and only loosely associated.  Just based on my observations (and I live in Kentucky, which is "Baptist country"), entertain-gelicals are leaving their traditional denominations for trendy megachurches; its polar opposite, "house churching", also seems to be growing in popularity. 

The Catholic Church's losses in membership can probably be attributed to the typical liberal, Novus Ordo, Vatican II reasons.  Traditionalism is growing, for sure--do you ever hear of a trad Catholic who leaves tradition to become a neocon or liberal Catholic, or a Protestant?  I've never heard of a trad Catholic becoming a Protestant.  It's always the other way around.  The only thing close to that I've heard of is a neoCatholic merely "flirting" with traditionalism backsliding to fully embrace neocatholicism and the Novus Ordo.  Interestingly, prior to Vatican II, in the U.S. at least, it was almost unheard of for a Catholic to become Protestant, but conversions to Catholicism were literally ten times what they are now (400,000 per year pre-Vatican II, about 40,000 per year now, I think).  Now its more common for Catholics (always Novus Ordo, of course) to "kick the Pope" and become Protestant.  Gee, I wonder why that is?  When the Novus Ordo Church essentially became Protestant and denied that the Catholic Church is the sole ark of salvation and all religions are more or less equal paths, Catholics no longer saw much of a difference between the Catholic Church and Protestantism and a Catholic will turn Protestant now with barely a second thought, much like a Baptist switching to the Methodist church down the street because he likes the preacher better (or the after-service coffee hour, or the color of the carpet).

 I see this as a positive development.  As Novus Ordians contracept themselves out of existence and nominal "Catholics" (who are for all practical purposes non-Catholics who retain the title "Catholic") leave the Church like sloughed-off dead skin, the real Catholics, traditionalists, continue to grow in strength and numbers and gain more prominence and influence in the Church. 

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