Did Christ suffer when He descended into hell?
#31
I thought he descended into the Limbo of the Fathers and released the good Old Testament followers.  It's my understanding that its quite a bit different than going to the fiery center. 
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#32
(03-02-2010, 07:44 PM)patrickinmpls Wrote: I thought he descended into the Limbo of the Fathers and released the good Old Testament followers.  It's my understanding that its quite a bit different than going to the fiery center. 

Yes, that is and always has been the Church's teaching on the matter (though it is not infallible, strictly speaking). 

This idea that Christ went to Hell and, much more, that He suffered there with demons and the damned souls is absolutely ridiculous and has no place in the history of Catholic theology not to mention that it would create a whole bunch of Christological issues.
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#33
I don't pretend to be a theologian but in my opinion the answer is definitely no. We have His own words as He died: "It is finished". His suffering for redemption ended at that moment.
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#34
I don't think He suffered in Hell because His purpose in going there was to release souls. He was like opening a door to  a breathe of fresh air and let's get outa here!  :laughing:
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#35
(03-09-2009, 03:23 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I agree with Didi. The "hell" Jesus descended into isn't the lake of fire prepared for the devils and his angels. This "hell" can be taken two ways: First, it is simply the grave where the body of Jesus was buried, just as Jonah was three days in the belly of the whale. Second, it is the Limbo of the Fathers where the good and just souls of the Old Testament waited for the Messiah. Jesus' soul descended there to preach the good news of their entrance into heaven.  Since the gut meaning of hell is "separation from God"... Jesus, being God, could never be separated from Himself or from the Father or the Holy Spirit. In His human nature He suffered the torments of the Cross. In His Divine nature He could not suffer. Jonah, being a mere man, could have suffered. Metaphors don't often match word-for-word the truths that fulfill them.  - Lisa

Remember when Jesus said "My God, My God why have you forsaken me?" perhaps at the point when Jesus was bearing the sins of the whole world he was briefly separated from the Father. Thats just my speculation and others I think, I don't know, its one of the scariest and most mysterious verses in the bible in my opinion, we can only guess what the suffering of Christ was like at that point.
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#36
(03-03-2010, 02:17 AM)sheep101 Wrote:
(03-09-2009, 03:23 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I agree with Didi. The "hell" Jesus descended into isn't the lake of fire prepared for the devils and his angels. This "hell" can be taken two ways: First, it is simply the grave where the body of Jesus was buried, just as Jonah was three days in the belly of the whale. Second, it is the Limbo of the Fathers where the good and just souls of the Old Testament waited for the Messiah. Jesus' soul descended there to preach the good news of their entrance into heaven.  Since the gut meaning of hell is "separation from God"... Jesus, being God, could never be separated from Himself or from the Father or the Holy Spirit. In His human nature He suffered the torments of the Cross. In His Divine nature He could not suffer. Jonah, being a mere man, could have suffered. Metaphors don't often match word-for-word the truths that fulfill them.  - Lisa

Remember when Jesus said "My God, My God why have you forsaken me?" perhaps at the point when Jesus was bearing the sins of the whole world he was briefly separated from the Father. Thats just my speculation and others I think, I don't know, its one of the scariest and most mysterious verses in the bible in my opinion, we can only guess what the suffering of Christ was like at that point.

It seems that the traditional Thomist response to that is that that is the precise moment when Christ took upon Himself all sin.  In a sense He became sin Himself and thus the Father had to remove His gaze from Christ.  In that moment Christ felt the separation from God due to sin that we feel in our fallen nature.  It could be said, in some way, that Christ felt a little taste of hell then just as the sinner feels a little taste of hell due to original sin and our separation from the Source of all Goodness and Life.  And in experiencing this it can be said that Christ experienced all the different types of suffering that man experiences including this separation which is most aptly thought of as the worst of all human suffering.
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#37
(03-02-2010, 09:45 PM)Avus Wrote: I don't pretend to be a theologian but in my opinion the answer is definitely no. We have His own words as He died: "It is finished". His suffering for redemption ended at that moment.

Perhaps Christ's human nature suffered emotionally when he saw all those who would be damned?  There is more to suffering than physical pain, after all...
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#38
(03-03-2010, 11:50 AM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(03-02-2010, 09:45 PM)Avus Wrote: I don't pretend to be a theologian but in my opinion the answer is definitely no. We have His own words as He died: "It is finished". His suffering for redemption ended at that moment.

Perhaps Christ's human nature suffered emotionally when he saw all those who would be damned?  There is more to suffering than physical pain, after all...

Agreed. But my belief is that "it is finished" referred to all His suffering, not just physical.
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