What's your confirmation name? (newest thread)
#51
Mine was Michael, and I was 13, in the 7th grade. The bishop who Confirmed me was Austin Vaughn, who was arrested protesting abortion outside of a clinic years later.

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#52
St. Michael the Archangel. I was 7.
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#53
DeiMateralma Wrote:Rose

I was 9.

Ditto!

WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:Wenceslaus.

Seriously.

I was a strange 13-year-old.


Awesome.
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#54
St_Josephs_Man Wrote:I have two - Pascal Baylon and Joseph. I was 19 when I was Confirmed.
Two?  Is a confirmand allowed two?  What are the rules governing confirmation names, and how far back in Church history can this custom, in one form or another, be traced? 
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#55
St. Mark (I can't remember why I picked him, but I'm sure it was for a good reason).  I notice that some here have two Confirmation names - I couldn't decide between St. Mark and St. Don Bosco, but Sister wouldn't let me use both.

I was confirmed on May 4, 1964, in the 7th. grade and 12 years old (public school CCD kids were confirmed in the 8th. grade).  We were the last Confirmation class confirmed with the old rite. 

It was traditional in our parish for 8th. grade parochial school boys to serve at Confirmation.  We had rehearsed for the ceremony, and then at the last minute had to re-rehearse for a different ceremony, which was done within the Mass (the old rite was done without a Mass, at least in our diocese.  I had always since thought that the new rite of Confirmation was introduced in 1965 then, but have read that it was introduced later, so this must have been one of the interim forms.  It was still in Latin (approved translations weren't available yet) but it was simpler, and within the Mass.
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#56
moneil Wrote: I had always since thought that the new rite of Confirmation was introduced in 1965 then, but have read that it was introduced later, so this must have been one of the interim forms.  It was still in Latin (approved translations weren't available yet) but it was simpler, and within the Mass.

I often wondered about that. I was confirmed in March 1965. I always assumed it was the old rite because of the Latin and the tap (slap) on the cheek.
 
- Lisa
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#57
I took my name from Saint Josue the Patriarch. This made my initials to resemble--but not be identical to--the Tetragramaton (not to say anything of myself, but to honor our Creator, of course). I could have chosen any "J" Saint, but Josue intrigued me in particular, and Didishroom could not have said why any better than in this post: http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/apologia/show_single_post?pid=32546654&postcount=2
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#58
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
moneil Wrote: I had always since thought that the new rite of Confirmation was introduced in 1965 then, but have read that it was introduced later, so this must have been one of the interim forms.  It was still in Latin (approved translations weren't available yet) but it was simpler, and within the Mass.

I often wondered about that. I was confirmed in March 1965. I always assumed it was the old rite because of the Latin and the tap (slap) on the cheek.
 
- Lisa

Was there a Mass with your Confirmation?  It very well may have been pretty much the old rite, with perhaps a few ancillary rituals removed because of their being a Mass also.

One thing I remember, when we rehearsed for the origional form (outside of Mass), there was one altar server who carried a small silver tray with a crucifix on it, covered by a white linen cloth.  We processed from the sacristy around the church to the vestibule (out of sight and sound of everybody) and stoped.  Everybody knelt down (except the Bishop, I think).  The crucifix was uncovered, sprinkled with Holy Water, and censed.  The Bishop said some prayers in Latin, then the crucifix was covered up (not to be used again, I don't believe), we all got up, and the procession continued on to the sanctuary.  To this day I have no clue what the ritual was all about, or what it's connection to Confirmation might be.  If Father Cekada should peek in on this thread, perhaps he knows [Image: smile.gif].  That was one ritual that was absent when we re-rehearsed for the Confirmation ceremony held with a Mass.

Otherwise, I don't really remember how much different the Confirmation with a Mass in 1965 was from my Confirmation in 1964.  After all, that was 44 years ago, and you can imagine how well 8th. graders paid attention to those details.

But, if your Confirmation had been at St. Patrick's in Pasco, WA (Diocese of Spokane) I would have been one of the altar servers!
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#59
I was 11.  I didn't pick a name since we were told that was "optional."  We also didn't receive instruction of any type, even the watered-down new-fangled instruction.  Meh.  My dad taught me more than I would've learned from my priest anyway.   I ended up with $150, the most money I'd ever seen at one time.  A pity that's what I remember most about my confirmation, but that's what liturgical "renewal" gets ya.
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#60
Cecelia. Don't know why I chose that name other than I thought it was pretty. And now I know why I chose it, I love music. I was 8 years old in 1962, the nuns sent a note home with us that we would be confirmed on such and such date, with all the information as to what we should wear (my mom had died and my dad was non catholic) luckily he had a good friend from our parish that helped him out . I made First Communion one year and Confirmed the next. I helped out with my own kids Confirmation groups so I could understand  what everything meant.
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