Liturgy
#1
What exactly constitutes a part of the Liturgy. What elements do the Mass and Divine Office have that, for example, the Stations of the Cross do not? What makes the Liturgy the Liturgy?
Reply
#2
Credo Wrote:What exactly constitutes a part of the Liturgy. What elements do the Mass and Divine Office have that, for example, the Stations of the Cross do not? What makes the Liturgy the Liturgy?

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia:

Quote:On the one hand, liturgy often means the whole complex of official services, all the rites, ceremonies, prayers, and sacraments of the Church, as opposed to private devotions. In this sense we speak of the arrangement of all these services in certain set forms (including the canonical hours, administration of sacraments, etc.), used officially by any local church, as the liturgy of such a church -- the Liturgy of Antioch, the Roman Liturgy, and so on. So liturgy means rite; we speak indifferently of the Byzantine Rite or the Byzantine Liturgy. In the same sense we distinguish the official services from others by calling them liturgical; those services are liturgical which are contained in any of the official books (see LITURGICAL BOOKS) of a rite. In the Roman Church, for instance, Compline is a liturgical service, the Rosary is not.

So if it's in the Missal, Breviary, Pontifical or Ritual then it's Liturgy.



Reply
#3
kclaib Wrote:So if it's in the Missal, Breviary, Pontifical or Ritual then it's Liturgy.

But why? What do those prayers have that sets them apart from the Rosary, for instance. Using a small facet of the liturgy: Surely the long hoped for general uniformity of worship within the various Rites of the Church could be done much more easily with some kind of streamlining of the Rosary (this particular prayer just being an example) and subsequently calling it a liturgical prayer than it has been effected in the Mass, where documents like the GIRM and GILOTH have failed to achieve the same ends.

BTW - I'm asking this for an essay I'm writing for this forum dealing with the Divine Office. This is one of the roadblocks which has been encountered.
Reply
#4
I've heard the Stations referred to as a 'Liturgical Tradition'. I'm not sure how official the term is though.
Reply
#5
loggats Wrote:I've heard the Stations referred to as a 'Liturgical Tradition'. I'm not sure how official the term is though.

The closest I've heard was quasi-liturgical, the same with the Rosary. Like you though, who's to say how official this is?

Nonetheless, what exactly qualifies something as liturgical?
Reply
#6
Maybe they are excluded from being fully liturgical because they are not fundamental to the worship of God? The Mass is, and the Hours are a manual for living the Catholic life.

Grasping at straws...
Reply
#7
Credo Wrote:But why? What do those prayers have that sets them apart from the Rosary, for instance. Using a small facet of the liturgy: Surely the long hoped for general uniformity of worship within the various Rites of the Church could be done much more easily with some kind of streamlining of the Rosary (this particular prayer just being an example) and subsequently calling it a liturgical prayer than it has been effected in the Mass, where documents like the GIRM and GILOTH have failed to achieve the same ends.
Well, one big thing that distinguishes the Breviary, Missal and Pontifical is that the prayers and ceremonies are of Divine, Apostolic or Patristic origin. Most of the devotions are more recent. They also prevail in similar, though not identical forms across the Universal Church, the devotions are more localized.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)