Protests erupt over new English translation of the Roman Missal
#11
There has been a lot of controversy surrounding the English translation of the Roman Missal.

As a Novus Ordo Catholic who took three years of Latin in high school and is familiar with the original language of both the TLM and the NO, I can't wait until I get to use the word "consubstantial" in the vernacular Credo.

The three "mea culpa"s in the Confiteor will also be translated properly, so will will the "pro multis" in the consecration, likewise so will the "Domine, non sum dignus."

It will totally confuse my NO bretheren, but I am looking forward to it. As long as the NO is the ordinary rite, then let's get it right.

Now if only we could go back to the ordinary method of receiving Communion...
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#12
I receive communion the same way as I always did no matter what mass I'm at (excepting other approved rights which may be substantially different...some require a slight alteration in reception)
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#13
I have returned to receiving on the tongue, even if no one else has.
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#14
I can also predict that there's going to be a huge amount of controversy in the US when this translation comes our way.  The more liberal priest will probably stall on using the translation as long as they can (just like some trad priest continued to say the TLM in the 60's and 70's until they were ordered to stop).

I hope it does come out sooner then later.  I can't wait to here my first mass with it.

Bob
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#15
Complaints about translations are easy to manage though; tell them to use the original text from which it is translated. They had no objections about that.
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#16
ONeill Wrote:Complaints about translations are easy to manage though; tell them to use the original text from which it is translated. They had no objections about that.
That'll throw them for a loop.
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