Getting family to church...without acrimony
#11
Have you ever tried special & delicious Sunday breakfast food ? We try to have some special little treat - pain au chocolat, something to lure them up and then downstairs. Yes, you CAN have hot chocolate, yes you can have fired bacon - just get up, darlings,now.
Sadly, some priests do not make things easy or inviting for young people [no;I don't want guitars and tambourines] ; we went to a Low Mass and sermon not long ago which lasted one hour and thirty-five minutes. One distraught mother told me that Sunday was the day of the week she dreaded most of all and started to get twitchy on Thursdays. Alan Robinson
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#12
In a way I'm jealous because I'm the only one (and last one) who still goes to Church. I wish I could with my family to Church, most notably with my grandparents but they have both passed away, alas. The things I wouldn't do to go to H. Mass just once with my grandfather+ or great-grandmother+ ... ! Just sunday is a calm day for me because that is usually the only day I don't attend H. Mass.
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#13
Achonry Wrote:Have you ever tried special & delicious Sunday breakfast food ? We try to have some special little treat - pain au chocolat, something to lure them up and then downstairs. Yes, you CAN have hot chocolate, yes you can have fired bacon - just get up, darlings,now.
Sadly, some priests do not make things easy or inviting for young people [no;I don't want guitars and tambourines] ; we went to a Low Mass and sermon not long ago which lasted one hour and thirty-five minutes. One distraught mother told me that Sunday was the day of the week she dreaded most of all and started to get twitchy on Thursdays. Alan Robinson

There is the pre Liturgy fast that must be held.(At least an Hour)
I have tried reward items ...and breakfast out...but its a party of 7 every sunday...$$$$
I was hoping to hear from other parents and you kids are great...I just want to know do you hate US for forcing you to church???
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#14
frerejacques Wrote:[Image: bfskinneratharvardcircax.jpg]

I imagined how BF Skinner would get his family out of bed for church Sunday morning:  I linked the desired behavior (on time at Mass) with a reward (breakfast).  We take turns choosing where to go - nothing elaborate;  sometimes it's smoothies or bagels, other times it's hash browns at the cowboy diner.  It works pretty well.  When my daughter is older and can cook her own breakfast this might not work anymore, though.   And it's cheap because there's only two of us, I'm aware that this would be disastrously expensive for someone with more mouths to feed.

Doesn't this involve bribery? I wish we'd had a special post-Mass breakfast. Still, there's always Sunday lunch.
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#15
voxpopulisuxx Wrote:Every Sunday I have to act like a drill Sargent to get the kids and sometimes even the mrs. Up and ready for church. I hate it because I rarely get to church calm.... Any loving thoughts will be appreciated.

It's often like that here, and I'm the "mrs." in the scenario.  We live an over an hour away from all 3 TLM sites available to us (one FSSP, two SSPX); at least one of those is strictly out of the question since it begins at 8am (our normal wake-up time).  The other 2 begin at 11:30, which coincides with naptime, making for a very crabby bunch o' kidlets--even Mr. Underdog, who went thru so much order barking and scolding is crabby by this time (he works nights), and our priest is so sloooooooooooow with the Latin that a low Mass takes almost 2 hrs (no joke).  By the time it's all over we are exhausted, and are already dreading the following Sunday.  What I wouldn't give to have a church 5-10 min away!
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#16
voxpopulisuxx Wrote:   What hurts is that I feel as a father like such a hypocrit, yelling and cajoling and then praying and listening to Love Incarnate through the Liturgy. (Also I am afraid of them all rebelling against Church because of me)

You're not a hypocrite.  You love them and you want what's best for them, and I'm sure they know it.  They have an obligation to get to church, and you have an obligation to get them there.  They know they have to get up and go to school during the week, and you're making them understand that it's even more important to get up and go to church on Sunday.  If you don't, who will? 
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#17
The car rolls out of driveway at 7 AM sharp. If they miss it, then they can stay home with their Dad and go to the local NO. Most of mine that've reached the age of reason way prefer the TLM. So, it works for me.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#18
Why do so few churches have afternoon Sunday Mass? It makes it alot easier for late risers like me to go to mass, and I am sure that would be the case for many young children.
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#19
sheep101 Wrote:Why do so few churches have afternoon Sunday Mass? It makes it alot easier for late risers like me to go to mass, and I am sure that would be the case for many young children.

Well, that is a recent problem I think. In earlier times everyone lived near a church so getting up in time for the 10 AM Mass was no problem at all. A priest told me that even the daily masses at 06:45 AM were filled with people. Today is a different thing. Our habits have changed (sunday is almost the only day I don't have to get up early) and many churches have become closed. It's impressive when I read here about people making small pilgrimages on sunday to a FSSP/FSSPX church to attend the H. Mass on sunday. I should do that as well but it would include a travel time of about 2 hours to get there. I remember Ash Wednesday this year when leaving work and racing back home to get to church. Not only there's a church right across the street from where I work, but I must have passed 20 on my way home. All of these were abandoned, lifeless. Just imagine what the Catholic world would like without Vaticanum II? We would be able to continue to go to our old parish churches, just like our forefathers did, and we could even sleep a little more on sunday. But instead, for the rest of those who do not want to waver from God and fall into apostasy, we are left with some challenges of practical nature.
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#20
voxpopulisuxx Wrote:I was hoping to hear from other parents and you kids are great...I just want to know do you hate US for forcing you to church???

When I was a teenager, I hated going to Mass.  Granted, it was the NO, but I would've hated the Latin Mass too.  But my dad had one simple rule:  As long as you're sleeping under my roof and putting your feet under my table, you will go to Mass.  Period.  No discussion. What's worse (from a teenage perspective) is that Dad never liked the Saturday afternoon "vigil" Mass.  He always wanted to go on Sunday morning, early. Dad was an ex-Marine and had a temper, so it wasn't prudent to push him too much.

Did I hate him at the time for it?  Absolutely.  Do I look back gratefully?  Absolutely.  I try to remember him at every Mass I attend now (he's been dead for 15 years).  My point is, your kids may hate you now, but they'll understand when they get older.  As long as they can see you living your faith (not just on Sunday), it will have an effect.  You never know when that seed you planted is going to bloom. 
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