Interview with Bp Dolan and Fr Cekada
#1
http://truerestoration.blogspot.com/2009...n-and.html
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#2
[Edit by Quis - remove discussion of sedevacantism]
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#3
[Edit by Quis - remove discussion of sedevacantism]
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#4
You know, if you take out the sedevacantist politics out of the interview (of which there is actually very little), it's a brilliant interview with extremely sharp men.

It's a nice retrospective appeal for latecomers to Tradition like me.

The most interesting exchange:
Quote:But back to your point — there was no preaching — there would be one priest giving the announcements while another priest was saying the Mass.

That really happened?

Both: Oh yes, that was standard practice.

That’s horrifying. The young traditional Catholics — we come in thinking that the way it is now is the way it is supposed to be. So in one way we aren’t handicapped, because we would never dream of doing something as ludicrous as that.

Bp. D. Then priests, if it was a more restrained church, would start distributing communion at the Our Father. If not, they would do it starting after the consecration.

So you would have two or three priests working a given Mass. You would have one priest saying Mass as quickly as he could. Another would be in the pulpit giving the announcements and reading the Gospel, and some days there would be no sermon at all. You would have one priest who would go to the pulpit at all the Masses look at these sermon notes printed in a book, and just make something up.

If you went back to the sacristy there were probably a couple of priests smoking and joking and talking.

Fr. C. The pastor would be out in the parking lot with orange gloves directing traffic with a whistle.

Bp. D. If he was the pastor he said the 6:30 and would have had a pretty good breakfast, thank you very much. So by the time you get your crowd, 9, 10, 11, he’s ready for action, and he’s got his other priests, who are all trained to collect the money and get the people in and out and he’s directing traffic because he kind of enjoys it.

That was the Sunday experience.

Because that’s not the experience I had growing up in the Novus Ordo. We never distributed communion at the Our Father, we were busy holding hands still…

The traditional Masses, even in the Society, are not how Mass was back in the old days at all. I remember giving a sermon on the pros and cons of the Indult when it came to town. I actually went to see it. As soon as I stepped into this Church — it was an experience. It was so eerie. You know, nostalgic Catholics come to Mass with us for the first time and they weep. “This takes me back to my childhood.” That’s a big factor in all of this.

But it’s a faulty memory, because it wasn’t like that.

Yes, faulty memory. But it is a part of your life you can relive, part of your childhood — the Latin Mass. People don’t make it for the long run just on that alone, but for the short run they are really happy for a while. But when I went to that Indult church it took me back to my childhood in a really eerie way, in a way that I have never experienced in any traditional chapel anywhere in the world. There was this mumbling, this rushing around the altar, gothic vestments flying, that even the old independent priests, like Fr. Wickens, didn’t capture. It was weird. It made me realize, this memory, that maybe it wasn’t such a good thing what was going on back then. It obviously needed to be reformed somehow. It was the sort of change or reform that you would get by bringing in the Redemptorists or the Passionists or somebody like that.
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#5
I believe we had to point out the abundance of the priests and the abundance of the Churchgoers, so it was a necessity so celebrate six or more Masses every Sunday.



WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:You know, if you take out the sedevacantist politics out of the interview (of which there is actually very little), it's a brilliant interview with extremely sharp men.

It's a nice retrospective appeal for latecomers to Tradition like me.

The most interesting exchange:
Quote:But back to your point — there was no preaching — there would be one priest giving the announcements while another priest was saying the Mass.

That really happened?

Both: Oh yes, that was standard practice.

That’s horrifying. The young traditional Catholics — we come in thinking that the way it is now is the way it is supposed to be. So in one way we aren’t handicapped, because we would never dream of doing something as ludicrous as that.

Bp. D. Then priests, if it was a more restrained church, would start distributing communion at the Our Father. If not, they would do it starting after the consecration.

So you would have two or three priests working a given Mass. You would have one priest saying Mass as quickly as he could. Another would be in the pulpit giving the announcements and reading the Gospel, and some days there would be no sermon at all. You would have one priest who would go to the pulpit at all the Masses look at these sermon notes printed in a book, and just make something up.

If you went back to the sacristy there were probably a couple of priests smoking and joking and talking.

Fr. C. The pastor would be out in the parking lot with orange gloves directing traffic with a whistle.

Bp. D. If he was the pastor he said the 6:30 and would have had a pretty good breakfast, thank you very much. So by the time you get your crowd, 9, 10, 11, he’s ready for action, and he’s got his other priests, who are all trained to collect the money and get the people in and out and he’s directing traffic because he kind of enjoys it.

That was the Sunday experience.

Because that’s not the experience I had growing up in the Novus Ordo. We never distributed communion at the Our Father, we were busy holding hands still…

The traditional Masses, even in the Society, are not how Mass was back in the old days at all. I remember giving a sermon on the pros and cons of the Indult when it came to town. I actually went to see it. As soon as I stepped into this Church — it was an experience. It was so eerie. You know, nostalgic Catholics come to Mass with us for the first time and they weep. “This takes me back to my childhood.” That’s a big factor in all of this.

But it’s a faulty memory, because it wasn’t like that.

Yes, faulty memory. But it is a part of your life you can relive, part of your childhood — the Latin Mass. People don’t make it for the long run just on that alone, but for the short run they are really happy for a while. But when I went to that Indult church it took me back to my childhood in a really eerie way, in a way that I have never experienced in any traditional chapel anywhere in the world. There was this mumbling, this rushing around the altar, gothic vestments flying, that even the old independent priests, like Fr. Wickens, didn’t capture. It was weird. It made me realize, this memory, that maybe it wasn’t such a good thing what was going on back then. It obviously needed to be reformed somehow. It was the sort of change or reform that you would get by bringing in the Redemptorists or the Passionists or somebody like that.
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#6
glgas Wrote:I believe we had to point out the abundance of the priests and the abundance of the Churchgoers, so it was a necessity so celebrate six or more Masses every Sunday.

I think his critique is not the number of Masses offered on the weekend, but the casual and clubby atmosphere of the parishes.
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#7
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
glgas Wrote:I believe we had to point out the abundance of the priests and the abundance of the Churchgoers, so it was a necessity so celebrate six or more Masses every Sunday.

I think his critique is not the number of Masses offered on the weekend, but the casual and clubby atmosphere of the parishes.

I  was embarrassed about the statement that our Pope is heretic. I simply made the statement that the changes since 1970 decreased the number of active priests by one third (60,000 to 40,000 and rapidly shrinking), and the number of the churchgoers by two thirds, from 60% to 20% of the Catholics.

I do not believe that this has anything to do with Benedict XVI, he turned the direction.

The future is for the obedient part of SSPX, for the FSSP, Institute of Christ the King, St John Cantius, and for the New Order parishes which start to turn toward that direction.

laszlo

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#8
I didn't think we were supposed to link to sede sites here.
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#9
[Edit by Quis - remove discussion of sedevacantism]
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#10
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I didn't think we were supposed to link to sede sites here.
The OP is the publisher of Bishop Williamson's books, as well as His Lordship's "blogmaster". His site doesn't qualify as a "sede site".
And Fr. Cekada is a member of this Forum.
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