Traditional Franciscan Monastery in the making?
#1

http://www.franciscan-archive.org/whatsnew.html

Bishop Ignazio Zambito welcomes Br. Alexis Bugnolo

editor of The Franciscan Archive

into the Diocese of Patti, Sicily

February 23, 2009:  His Excellency Monsignor Ignazio Zambito welcomed Br. Alexis Bugnolo, today, to the Diocese of Patti, Sicily, and granted him permission to live the traditional Franciscan life and build, with his blessing, a small hermitage where he and others interested in returning to the papal observance of the Rule can live. While this does not constitute permission to found a community, a place in the Church for Franciscan vocations who want to dedicate themselves to the Ancient Traditions of their order, and for vocations inspired to do likewise, is now open.  Br. Alexis Bugnolo, with the help of his American and Italian benefactors, has subsequently made his residence at Floresta, in the province of Messina, and has the use of an Apartment where vocations can gather to discern their vocations:  with the view of approaching the Bishop for permission to found a community ad experimentum as soon as 2 vocations present themselves.

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http://www.franciscan-archive.org/whatsnew.html

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#2
I tremendously respect Br. Alexis Bugnolo, an Italian American, and great Franciscan.

I hope he will be succesful.

But will this (conservative) bishop allow not only the "extraordinary form of the Roman Rite" (traditional Roman Rite, that is), but also Br. Bugnolo O.F.M.'s traditional theology and his criticism of Vatican II and the theological and liturgical aberration.

Friar Alexis is great and orthodox Roman Catholic, and he will not be silenced, I think.

Sicily is a great island. With Greek, Phoenician, Italian, Roman, Celtic, Norman and Arabic traditions. If you think away the Maffia Connections, the population is very nice and most laymen and lay women are pious.
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#3
HMiS Wrote:I tremendously respect Br. Alexis Bugnolo, an Italian American, and great Franciscan.

I hope he will be succesful.

But will this (conservative) bishop allow not only the "extraordinary form of the Roman Rite" (traditional Roman Rite, that is), but also Br. Bugnolo O.F.M.'s traditional theology and his criticism of Vatican II and the theological and liturgical aberration.

Friar Alexis is great and orthodox Roman Catholic, and he will not be silenced, I think.

Sicily is a great island. With Greek, Phoenician, Italian, Roman, Celtic, Norman and Arabic traditions. If you think away the Maffia Connections, the population is very nice and most laymen and lay women are pious.


I may be wrong, but I think the days are coming where Vatican II can start to be discussed through an objective lens (without detracting from the Council's legitimacy)... ... without necessarily such discussions being labelled ''taboo''/''schismatic'' from the outset. Even Card. Ratzinger criticised Gaudium et Spes, I believe, as being quasi-Pelagian in its emphasis. That's not to downplay the 60s gang and their ideological descendants and their influence...but the general tide seems to be changing.

What is the state of the Church in Sicily? If in the practical everyday sense, the 'spirit of Vatican II' has not overly penetrated the region, it will make things a whole lot easier for this new endevour. 
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#4
Maybe this thread isn't the best to ask it, but I know that a number of folks have discerned Franciscan vocations here. And I don't ask this out of any sort of vocational discernment, but an interest in Franciscan spirituality and a curiosity about religious orders in general.

How do the Franciscans and other mendicants (Augustinians, Dominicans, etc.) live day-to-day this age? They aren't cloistered, yet I never see friars going about preaching, although I do see friars just going about now and then in their habits (I live nearby an Augustinian friary), presumably doing academic things.

I'm not saying I expect them to pull a Savonarola or even go "fundie street preacher" but I wouldn't think seeing a mendicant preaching or going about visibly living the Christian life in the presence of others would be rare. Have they generally adopted a more formal, organized "social service" model of the charitable religious life in the world, with soup kitchens and food pantries and the like?
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#5
Well the CFR's (Fr. Groeschel's Franciscans) are involved with serving the poor through soup kitchens and so forth.

The Franciscans of the Immaculate give missions and Days with Mary. They live only by providence.  Much support comes from their Third Order and other lay benefactors.  Anything  left over is given to those poorer then them.  I once asked a friar who did the grocery shopping. He was surprised at the question and said they never shop.  Things like the friary doorbell would ring and a bag of groceries were anonymously left would happen.

About all I can comment on.
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#6
Cyriacus Wrote:Maybe this thread isn't the best to ask it, but I know that a number of folks have discerned Franciscan vocations here. And I don't ask this out of any sort of vocational discernment, but an interest in Franciscan spirituality and a curiosity about religious orders in general.

How do the Franciscans and other mendicants (Augustinians, Dominicans, etc.) live day-to-day this age? They aren't cloistered, yet I never see friars going about preaching, although I do see friars just going about now and then in their habits (I live nearby an Augustinian friary), presumably doing academic things.

I'm not saying I expect them to pull a Savonarola or even go "fundie street preacher" but I wouldn't think seeing a mendicant preaching or going about visibly living the Christian life in the presence of others would be rare. Have they generally adopted a more formal, organized "social service" model of the charitable religious life in the world, with soup kitchens and food pantries and the like?

They're not as common as they used to be but they're still out there. Carmelites tend to be more secluded and Augustinians and Dominicans are more than likely going to be seen in classrooms or in the actual parishes they're visiting (especially after post Vat-II reforms) but Franciscans, although not near as common as they used to be, can still be found on the streets giving food and clothing to the poor. If you lived in an area that contained a friary you probably would be used to seeing them as much as people are used to seeing the Salvation Army in other areas.

Traditional Augustinian and Dominican societies (like the St. Vincent Ferrier Society in France) are much more likely to preach on the streets or in coffee shops. But these societies are not found in English Speaking countries as much either. But Dominicans seem to be becoming more and more traditional as time goes on so this might change. 
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#7
WanderingPenitent Wrote:They're not as common as they used to be but they're still out there. Carmelites tend to be more secluded and Augustinians and Dominicans are more than likely going to be seen in classrooms or in the actual parishes they're visiting (especially after post Vat-II reforms) but Franciscans, although not near as common as they used to be, can still be found on the streets giving food and clothing to the poor. If you lived in an area that contained a friary you probably would be used to seeing them as much as people are used to seeing the Salvation Army in other areas.

Traditional Augustinian and Dominican societies (like the St. Vincent Ferrier Society in France) are much more likely to preach on the streets or in coffee shops. But these societies are not found in English Speaking countries as much either. But Dominicans seem to be becoming more and more traditional as time goes on so this might change. 
emph mine

Interesting. On what do you base that assertion?
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