SaraLucille's Sugar Cookies
#11
I don't like Texas BBQ. I like North Carolingian pulled pork BBQ, preferably on a bun with cole slaw.

What's Kansas BBQ like? Georgian?
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#12
Satori Wrote:I don't like Texas BBQ. I like North Carolingian pulled pork BBQ, preferably on a bun with cole slaw.

What's Kansas BBQ like? Georgian?

This is a complex question!  I'll have to answer it a few ways:

The thing that seems to hang most people up is sauce; it's often the first indicator in regional 'que.  In general, Southern barbeque has a vinegary style sauce.  Texans that use sauce (many misguided snobs do not), often use a spicy, tomato based sauce.  It's good, but kind of specific.  Kansas Citians use a brown sugary tomato based sauce.  Please note that KC Masterpiece is not indicative of KC sauces-- that stuff is made of molasses and sugar and is more like candy than sauce.  It's not that it's bad, it's just not KC style.

But there are other differences that are less noted and more important.

I think about types of wood used to smoke the meat: Texas 'que is noted for its Mesquite wood-- the mesquite tree grows well in Texas & Mexico, but it changes flavors when it's grown outside of that climate.  It loses its bitter edge and just ends up with a really dry smoke.  In Kansas City, we use primarily Hickory wood.  There's nothing finer than Missouri hickory-- it's sweet and layered between being bold and being subtle.  I don't know with what wood Memphiesians or Georgians smoke their meat-- but surmise that it's some combination of Hickory and Apple wood.  IMHO, the smokiness is less prominent in southern styles of 'que-- which is fine.  I believe in the power of subtlety in food.

Also the types of meat is different.  Kansas City and Texas barbeque is beef-centric barbeque because we're in cattle country.  Memphis/southern barbeque is more pork-centric because you're in swineland down there.  Everyone seems to appreciate smoked chicken and turkey-- and it is in the poultrys that you can most notice the different types of wood smoke.

Memphis and Texas seem overly obsessed with a proper pre-smoking rub; a combination of salt and other spices that you massage around the meat.  I like a decent rub, but think they have a tendency to over-salt or over-corrianderize the meat.  A Kansas City style often doesn't use any rub at all-- rather (and these are fightin' words in some places) we'll have a tendency to apply a thin brushing of the sauce onto the meat in the final stage of cooking.  The brown sugar in the sauce ends up in kind of soft glaze... not like a carmelization, but more like a "basting" of sorts.  You notice it most on pork shortribs... and to a lesser extent on beef brisquet or smoked sausage.
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#13
Satori Wrote:I don't like Texas BBQ. I like North Carolingian pulled pork BBQ, preferably on a bun with cole slaw.

What's Kansas BBQ like? Georgian?


well - Brunswick stew originated in Ga.
 
We use hickory down here - and pork.
 
Although there is a place south of Atlanta that used to use old wooden ( oak) pallets....I'm not kidding.
 
...and it was actually very good barbeque - i think it's the stuff that Jimmy Carter had flown to the White House... darn, I'm not making a good arguement here, am I?
 
We smoke the heck out of it first, and baste it in the later half of cooking.
 
The sauce is tomato/vinegar/sugar based - and on the table it has added sugar, etc.. but if you add the sugary sauces too much while barbequeing, it has a tendency to burn.
 
But one of the best barbeques I've ever had was in South Carolina . .. it was pork, but it had a mustardy vinegary sweet sauce - it was FANTASTIC.
 
 
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#14
Oh, man - and don't even get me started on Cuban pig -

[Image: tn?sid=2761828568&mid=AHfFtEQAABiYSdTjRw...&fid=Inbox]


 
it's even better than the Southern stuff.
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#15
You, sir, are clearly a connoisseur. I bow to you. And your regional BBQ sounds delish.

Madam, I adore that sugary-vinegary sauce myself.
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#16
Satori Wrote:You, sir, are clearly a connoisseur. I bow to you. And your regional BBQ sounds delish.

Madam, I adore that sugary-vinegary sauce myself.


[Image: tiphat2.gif]

My pleasure!
 
and for more info on pig roasts, Cuban style -
 
this about covers it:

http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html

little on the graphic side, I suppose, for those not used to handling whole pigs - but this is how it's done.
 
absolutely delicious.
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#17
How can you not mention the far superior Santa Maria Style barbecue of California???

It even has a saint in its name which makes it way more trad than any of the tortured, sticky messes you guys are talking about :P
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#18
Satori Wrote:Your loss ... you'll just have to wait till I have a cookie stand outside Home Depot or something.


What?  Wait... what did I say?  Hey, would you look at that?  I just re-upped! 

*waits for cookies to arrive*
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#19
Continuing with the thread derailment:
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:BUT.  If you're going to be in beautiful Kansas City anytime soon, I'll make you cookies.  And if you wait a couple weeks, I'll fire up the smoker and teach you Texas boys what barbeque is really all about.


Son, I'll take your Q, but only because I don't want you to lose your self-esteem. 
At least you make it with beef.
Not like some other peoples on this board. (you know who you are [Image: biggrin.gif])

Quote: Aside: I was listening to a Spring Training game yesterday and noticed that my Royals have picked up a new sponsor: Gates Bar-B.-Q. (http://www.gatesbbq.com/)  Oh, its such cruel torture... I want to pick up a handful of beef and eat it like an apple.  I'm always so eager for Lent to start and so sick of it by week 5.  So it goes, so it goes...

*sigh*  Ain't that the truth.

libby Wrote:  ...and it was actually very good barbeque - i think it's the stuff that Jimmy Carter had flown to the White House... darn, I'm not making a good arguement here, am I?

No Ma'am, you're not...    [Image: tomatoes.gif] 

to be cont.




(edited to add smilie at the end)

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#20
Paloma Wrote:How can you not mention the far superior Santa Maria Style barbecue of California???

It even has a saint in its name which makes it way more trad than any of the tortured, sticky messes you guys are talking about :P

[Image: lawrence2.jpg]Ha!  Saint Lawrence is the Patron Saint of barbeque, having been martyred on a gridiron.  Just before he succombed to death, he shouted to his torturers "Turn me over, I'm done on this side!" I smoked a pork butt last year on his feast day in tribute.  He's also the patron of vinters, brewers and comedians-- and generally speaking, my kind of guy.  If we are ever blessed with a baby boy, I will lobby for him to be named "Lawrence".  Girls might be named "Lawrencia".  (I will probably lose this proposition)

Tortured, sticky messes? Egad no!  Well maybe a little drippy... but not tortured and not sticky!

Okay, maybe a little sticky.  Are we too prim to lick our fingers?  There's something enduringly holistic about gnawing meat right from its bone... but my lovely wife won't eat ribs either.  :rolleyes:  Some people! 

What, exactly, is Oxnard barbeque like?  Whoppers smoked over burning tires and deglazed with Camo?

As a note, California is not really well known for it's barbeque, but there is a California Barbeque Society (how cute!) who recognizes St. Lawrence as its patron (http://www.cbbqa.org/wiki/index.php?titl...f_Barbecue).  But I think that California barbeque is actually just avacados, wheatgrass and free-range canteloupes boiled in a solar oven.  Maybe.  :laughing:

In any manner, let the record show that Kansas City barbeque is the "SaraLucille's Sugar Cookies" of the barbeque world.  Everything else may be fine, but it's clearly just battling for runner-up.

[Image: gimmefood.gif]

Is it Easter yet?

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