Catholicism and double predestination
#1
Jimmy Akin, in his article "A Tiptoe Through Tulip", wrote:
Quote:Although a Catholic may agree with unconditional election, he may not affirm "double-predestination," a doctrine Calvinists often infer from it. This teaching claims that in addition to electing some people to salvation God also sends others to damnation.

The alternative to double-predestination is to say that while God predestines some people, he simply passes over the remainder. They will not come to God, but it is because of their inherent sin, not because God damns them. This is the doctrine of passive reprobation, which Aquinas taught.[ST I:23:3].

The Council of Trent stated, "If anyone says that it is not in the power of man to make his ways evil, but that God produces the evil as well as the good works, not only by permission, but also properly and of himself, so that the betrayal of Judas is no less his own proper work than the vocation of Paul, let him be anathema. . . . If anyone shall say that the grace of justification is attained by those only who are predestined unto life, but that all others, who are called, are called indeed, but do not receive grace, as if they are by divine power predestined to evil, let him be anathema."[Decree on Justification, canons 6 and 17. The same points were taught by the second Council of Orange (531), the Council of Quiersy (853), and the third Council of Valencia (855), although none of these were ecumenical councils].
What, then, of the following de fide dogma?
Quote:God, by an Eternal Resolve of His Will, predestines certain men, on account of their foreseen sins, to eternal rejection.
Could someone with a copy of Ott's Fundamentals enlighten me on this point?
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#2
veritatem_dilexisti Wrote:Jimmy Akin, in his article "A Tiptoe Through Tulip", wrote:
Quote:Although a Catholic may agree with unconditional election, he may not affirm "double-predestination," a doctrine Calvinists often infer from it. This teaching claims that in addition to electing some people to salvation God also sends others to damnation.

The alternative to double-predestination is to say that while God predestines some people, he simply passes over the remainder. They will not come to God, but it is because of their inherent sin, not because God damns them. This is the doctrine of passive reprobation, which Aquinas taught.[ST I:23:3].

The Council of Trent stated, "If anyone says that it is not in the power of man to make his ways evil, but that God produces the evil as well as the good works, not only by permission, but also properly and of himself, so that the betrayal of Judas is no less his own proper work than the vocation of Paul, let him be anathema. . . . If anyone shall say that the grace of justification is attained by those only who are predestined unto life, but that all others, who are called, are called indeed, but do not receive grace, as if they are by divine power predestined to evil, let him be anathema."[Decree on Justification, canons 6 and 17. The same points were taught by the second Council of Orange (531), the Council of Quiersy (853), and the third Council of Valencia (855), although none of these were ecumenical councils].
What, then, of the following de fide dogma?
Quote:God, by an Eternal Resolve of His Will, predestines certain men, on account of their foreseen sins, to eternal rejection.
Could someone with a copy of Ott's Fundamentals enlighten me on this point?

First point, don't rely on Jimmy Akin.
Second point. Predestination is a difficult topic. God does not determine all human behavior, or love would be impossible (love is incompatible with force) but He sees all.
Ask yourself, does God see you acting now? Does His seeing it, make it any less free?
Now you've wrapped your head around the relationship between time and eternity. As St. Augustine and Boethius argue, time is the moving image of eternity. All things are "now" for God- creation, fall, redemption, eschatalogical fulfillment - all "now" from His perspective. And everything in between.
Tomorrow you will "x, y and z"... He sees that now. The end of your life will be "x". He knows that too.
I'm pretty hardline on this. The scriptures seem clear to me. God chooses. There are dozens of verses to affirm this, from the mouth of Our Lord nonetheless. There is an elect. We have no way of knowing who they are (contra Calvin). There is an "city of God" moving through history amongst the "city of Man" (cf St. Augustine).
Passive reprobation is the only rational conclusion -
St. Thomas 1, the world 0.
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