Eczema
#21
(04-18-2009, 11:19 PM)AdoramusTeChriste Wrote: It's called dishidrotic eczema.  http://skin-care.health-cares.net/dyshid...eczema.php

And it can be stress induced or at least so my doctor told me when I had it. Cortisone (steroid) cream cleared mine up and haven't had it since.
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#22
Do you have a cat or dog? Our family pet ( cat ) was a major culprit for our sons' condition. A large % of his skin cleared within a week or so just by giving our cat away to another family member. Then we were about to weed out other smaller triggers as well. He was completely covered. Open sores on his hands and feet as a baby...we could hear him scratching in the next room at night ( gross I know ). He has mostly grown out of it now...he's 6.
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#23
Waiting4coelis, we don't have any pets yet. Fortunately my daughter has improved greatly since we moved to a new house. We also narrowed down some of the triggers like certain foods. We're praying she stays well and eventually grows out of it. Her's was just as you described it with open sores and uncontrollable scratching. I'm glad to hear your son has outgrown it. 
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#24
This thread is really informative.  I'm gonna pass on the info about Gold Bond and vitamin D to my mom, who takes care of twin 2yo boys with horrible eczema.  Those poor things are just red red red, and itchy, and one has a constant sore on his hand b/c he sucks his thumb & the moisture just aggravates the problem.  Those sweet boys have such rough skin, and I hate to think about the discomfort they must always be in.

Iuvenalis, it's interesting that you would mention the attitude some people have toward being in the sun.  My son's godparents' children have problems with eczema (and the allergies, etc. that seem to go with it), and they are extremely fearful of sunlight.  When they go to the pool or the arboretum everyone gets super slathered with sunscreen (I can't imagine how much they must spend on that stuff) and must wear long sleeves (in Texas!) and wide brimmed hats.  It could very well be that they do not get enough vitamin D.  I'll pass your recommendation to them as well.  Thanks.  :)
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#25
(06-12-2009, 11:24 AM)Underdog Wrote: Iuvenalis, it's interesting that you would mention the attitude some people have toward being in the sun.  My son's godparents' children have problems with eczema (and the allergies, etc. that seem to go with it), and they are extremely fearful of sunlight.  When they go to the pool or the arboretum everyone gets super slathered with sunscreen (I can't imagine how much they must spend on that stuff) and must wear long sleeves (in Texas!) and wide brimmed hats.  It could very well be that they do not get enough vitamin D.  I'll pass your recommendation to them as well.  Thanks.   :)

Creepy! :)

Just be sure it's D3, which is the natural kind your body can actually use. D2 is synthetic, and for various reasons, often ignored by your body.

"Vitamin" D(3) isn't actually a "vitamin", it's a metabolic byproduct, that is, your body (should) make it. But our indoor lifestyle keeps us from doing so :)

Kids doses are about 800 IU/day if they're in the Northern Latitudes (North US or Canada) or if they have significant pigment (i.e. they're of black african descent), and 400IU/day otherwise.

Again, our doctor has us give "Just D" (from sunlightvitamins.com) to the baby (a liquid form), but if they're boys that can handle little pills (baby's can't, hence the liquid we use), the standard off-the-shelf variety oughta do them fine. Our pediatrician attends the Vitamin D conferences regularly, and is a personal friend of Dr. Cannell (sometimes called "Dr. Vitamin D," but I'm not sure he cares for that title :) ) so our Dr obviously recommends D3 heartily!

Be sure to check out the Vitamin D Council website, a 'coalition' if you will, of physicians (usually), here's some great points to get you started! http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitamin-d-quotes.shtml

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#26
(04-16-2009, 03:43 AM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(04-15-2009, 11:05 PM)Inion_Coinin Wrote: Eczema has been linked to flouridation of tap water.  You might want to try getting rid of flouride toothpaste for awhile.  Sponge bath for a couple of weeks using bottled water and see if her condition improves.  If it does, you might want to consider getting one of those super-water filters that filters out most of the flouride (many filters don't do this)

Doesn't surprise me.  Fluoride is highly toxic and has no business being in the water.  Toothpaste, yes, water that we drink, no.  The conspiracy theory is that it gave the aluminum manufacturers a place to dump their waste products.  The little I've looked into it, it seems that this conspiracy theory is correct.

I remeber when the "Magic School Bus" went through the water works and it saud fluoride was there to "protect kids from teeth cavitiies." And if you can't trust Miss Frizzle, who can you trust?
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#27
Didi, you can trust Miss Frizzle - as long as you keep in mind that she also likes traveling through people's colons.
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#28
Just discovered this thread, thanks a bunch!

I get eczema  from time to time, my experiences have lead to a couple conclusions (about mine at least) the first i don't think was mentioned:

1.  Metals.  Some trigger it for me.  Belt buckles (without my shirt tucked in), bad.  Watch, okay.  Can't say why.
2.  Fabric Softener.  Just say no.  It gets me itchy, and not itching to begin with is huge.  My Doc calls it the "itch that rashes."  Once it rashes, it gets BAD.
3.  Humidity matters.  Dry climates or even dry A/C make it worse.

A lot of other stuff mentioned here makes sense.  It just has to be dealt with quick before it gets out of hand.  I got it a little later, so just working on the will to not itch was huge.  Not helpful for babies i know, but my 2 cents.
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#29
My oldest has had eczema since he was born--

No fabric softener, and unscented everything (the only unscented shampoo i've found- kiss my face kid's)

Unscented, petroleum based lotions-- no Gold Bond!!!  It's way too harsh.  Nothing with nut oils.  Regular Vaseline, Eucerin, Cetaphil cream, etc, are the best.

Take fish oil or eat a lot of fatty fish (but kids do not like to eat sardines, I've learned)

Don't take a bath every day in winter, because it's so drying.

And for flare ups, you can use cortisone ointment (cream can sting) on the face, and there are stronger prescription steroid ointments that are great for the body but can never go on the face.
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