for those who excersize what is your workout routine?
#11
Crunches never seem to do much(I must be doing them wrong). Weighted pushups are good for most things above the waist, even abdominals. But the again, why am I giving advice? I'm only 150 lbs of bones.
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#12
Quote:Crunches never seem to do much(I must be doing them wrong).
They don't do much. The main purpose of the abdominal wall is to create pressure, not to flex. Without the intra-abdominal pressure created by those muscles, our spines would snap in two. The best excercise for them is the one which creates the most pressure. Deadlifts. Care must be taken to maintain a flat abdominal wall and highly pressurized. This is the hardest thing about proper natural deadlifts. It isn't standing up, it isn't holding on, it isn't straightening out. It is keeping the body pressurised and straight. The risks with heavy deadlifts improperly performed are great however. One can easily cause a hernia (of any sort...) with a moment's loosening of tension. 
Cleans (any sort of pull actually) have the same benefit but with a different focus. There is the explosive strength and the momentum of the weight. When the weight is swung or cleaned, the abs prevent the spine from bending backwards (note, there are some lifts which require bending backwards, but this is done by muscle control, not by yielding to the weight. 
Quote:Weighted pushups are good for most things above the waist, even abdominals. But the again, why am I giving advice? I'm only 150 lbs of bones.
There is much truth to that. Pushups require the abs to work to keep the spine straight (if your back caves, stop doing what you are doing). One way to use pushups specifically to do pushups is to do a special type, which involves lying prone on the ground with the arms above the head and hands flat on the floor and lifting your body off the ground using a solid chain of tension focusing on the abs. This is very hard to do however.
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#13
OK, now that I'm back, and before I go to the non-lifting alternative that I mentioned in my earlier post, I'll continue with some lifting sites.
First, we have StrongLifts.  There, you'll find descriptions and depictions on how to do different lifts.  They're also not a "body building" site.  They're after strength and fat loss.
If you want to go the body building route, I recommend Max-OT .  You'll have to register to get the workouts, although I'm sure you can find the workouts, elsewhere on the net.  There's also a bunch of workouts and other information at WannaBeBig

There's also GymJones, but to me, it's just re-hashed CrossFit.  CrossFit is what I call a non-lifting workout, although that's a mis-nomer  They do lifts, except not in the traditional sense.   It is a very varied and intense workout. If you go to the site, you'll see what I mean.  There's alot of body-weight exercises, as well as kettle bells, rope climbing, and there's a subset that is all into combatives, and such. 
Combatives:  that's a workout, right there!  I believe MikeSearson mentioned a workout of his, before.  I'd have to look, and see if I can find it.







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#14
Rosarium Wrote:
Quote:Crunches never seem to do much(I must be doing them wrong).
Quote:Weighted pushups are good for most things above the waist, even abdominals. But the again, why am I giving advice? I'm only 150 lbs of bones.
There is much truth to that. Pushups require the abs to work to keep the spine straight (if your back caves, stop doing what you are doing). One way to use pushups specifically to do pushups is to do a special type, which involves lying prone on the ground with the arms above the head and hands flat on the floor and lifting your body off the ground using a solid chain of tension focusing on the abs. This is very hard to do however.

I find pretty decent ab strengthening from 'mere' (correctly done, proper form) pushups and *pullups* (again, not jerking).

As for 'abs' I never really worried about them or tried to get them. I would guess there's a genetic component as Rosarium said, but I never considered them important beyond some sort of aesthetic which I never cared about. I care that I can hike without dying, run around and do stuff, basically I'm a big fan of functional health. I have benched well over 400, and even after not having focused on this for a long time do 315 for reps. Note that I don't do these anymore, because it's useless, I've never gotten any sort of benefit from being able to do this (possibly the other end of the genetics spectrum from 6 or 8 packs is raw strength?). So, probably ask someone who has such abs how to get them, I just want to avoid having a paunch, and good ab strength to lift heavy things (Rosarium has clearly done dead lifts as he recognizes the trunk strength that is key to doing them, most people think it's a back or ham exercise, or grip strength) and not herniate myself.

So, I like pull ups, pushups, and 'the stick' (on the shoulders, crucifix-style) with twists, good mornings, etc.
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#15
Quote:As for 'abs' I never really worried about them or tried to get them. I would guess there's a genetic component as Rosarium said, but I never considered them important beyond some sort of aesthetic which I never cared about.
Yes, it doesn't matter at all. They have the same purpose no matter how they look.
Quote:I care that I can hike without dying, run around and do stuff, basically I'm a big fan of functional health. I have benched well over 400, and even after not having focused on this for a long time do 315 for reps. Note that I don't do these anymore, because it's useless, I've never gotten any sort of benefit from being able to do this (possibly the other end of the genetics spectrum from 6 or 8 packs is raw strength?).
Bench presses are functionally useless because they are unnatural. They lock the scapula (unlike free standing lifts and pushups) when done properly and cause severe muscular imbalances by their nature. Over head lifts are much better for strength and health. 
Quote:So, probably ask someone who has such abs how to get them, I just want to avoid having a paunch, and good ab strength to lift heavy things (Rosarium has clearly done dead lifts as he recognizes the trunk strength that is key to doing them, most people think it's a back or ham exercise, or grip strength) and not herniate myself.

Yep. I used to dead lift daily. At a body weight of 135 lbs, I deadlifted 300 from a low position (small plates). I had to stop because the bar bent too much and I had not a proper floor for doing this. I then focused on faster pulls and bodyweight drills. I never used a belt or anything. Even after not working on strength for 3 years (about), my abs are still the same. They aren't sheet metal because of "crunches" :) 
Quote:So, I like pull ups, pushups, and 'the stick' (on the shoulders, crucifix-style) with twists, good mornings, etc.

Twists can be bad for your back. Try windmills if you can (find a proper guide for them):
I'll post more later. 
I prefer pistols (one legged squats, with weights or without), pull ups and swings, cleans, snatches and presses for training now. I used to do hand stand pushups, but I lack room for doing them now.

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#16
From reading through this thread a lot you guys are familiar with the kettlebell.  I just got one for my birthday in january...it is a really different sort of workout. I like it better than pushups because I have bad right shoulder from have to do so many in the service  :)

What do you guys think of the kettlebel and are there any girls who throw one around?
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#17
(04-21-2009, 02:36 PM)Sebastianus Wrote: What do you guys think of the kettlebel and are there any girls who throw one around?

Properly used, a girya is the best thing besides a pullup bar and a floor one could want.

I own two of them (both 53 lbs). The thicker the handle, the better (with a limit). The off centre weight, the thick handle, and its design allow for very effective use as a fully spectrum training device.
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#18
(04-11-2009, 09:00 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The most basic equipment easily obtained would be a barbell or a dumbell. A program of low rep sets with multiple sets of clean and jerks and strict pullups should transform you rather quickly.

You've recommended power movements without assessing his ability? I'm afraid you've put the cart before the horse.  Some people starting workout routines don't have the stability to do Dumbell movements, let alone power movements.
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#19
Keeping fit and healthy is easy. Try tap, jazz or modern. Though ballet would be more traditional....  ;D
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#20
(04-21-2009, 08:38 PM)Tiny Wrote: You've recommended power movements without assessing his ability?
The movements are completely natural. If a person has medical problems, they should consult their doctor about this. I'm assuming a normally function, if out of shape, body.

Quote: I'm afraid you've put the cart before the horse.  Some people starting workout routines don't have the stability to do Dumbell movements, let alone power movements.
Look at what you said again. They don't have the stability. That is absolutely true and it is absolutely why they should use such movements first. It is the major cause of injury people building up strength in a machine on one plane of movement then hurting themselves doing something which should be completely natural. Yes, this means starting with "light" weights, but it also means the body will be much stronger than artificial useless strength.

An average man could probably press 60 lbs in a smith machine. An average man would have trouble cleaning and pressing that I think (actually, I have no idea, I'm guessing these numbers). What is the reason? The smith machine excludes the most important muscles in the body while allowing the person to only use the primary movers. This is sort of like putting a cannon on a canoo. It is more dangerous to have unbalanced strength than it is to start with light weights. Start with a 15 lb dumbell for pressing and work from there. If one starts in a machine or other limiting device, they would build up strength to press (to a degree), and would over estimate their strength in real lifting. A person who learns to press 120 lbs in a smith machine would be in danger trying to clean that same weight (let alone pressing it).

Keep in mind I lifted 90 lbs with one hand slowly over my head from a standing position at a body weight of 135-140 lbs.  All without injury. Oh, it was a barbell I lifted ;) I trained to that using free natural lifting, no machines. The people on the machines are the ones who get hurt lifting boxes and get hernias when they go to the toilet.



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