for those who excersize what is your workout routine?
#31
Genetics, obviously plays a huge role.  The OP was inquiring about a "six-pack".  To achieve this, diet is the best answer, since the muscle, on a healthy adult, will already be there, regardless of what those late-night commercials would have you believe. 
Sit-ups and crunches, as well as all of those contraptions seen on TV, will not really help achieve what he's looking for, since you can't really spot-reduce.

A good diet, which supplies only the calories needed for whatever lifestyle he lives, along with a good exercise regimen, will help to get that 'six-pack'.
If you want mass, lift heavy and eat plenty of calories.
If you want mass and want to remain lean, lift heavy, do some kind of high intensity interval training, and ingest just enough calories, so that you can grow, but not so many that you will store them as fat.

Lifting for strength, is an entirely different animal.
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#32
(04-23-2009, 11:07 AM)Texican Wrote: A good diet, which supplies only the calories needed for whatever lifestyle he lives, along with a good exercise regimen, will help to get that 'six-pack'.
True.
Quote:If you want mass, lift heavy and eat plenty of calories.
sort of, you need volume to get mass.

Quote:If you want mass and want to remain lean, lift heavy, do some kind of high intensity interval training, and ingest just enough calories, so that you can grow, but not so many that you will store them as fat.
Wrong. That will not help at all. Just control the calories.

Quote:Lifting for strength, is an entirely different animal.
No, it is the same. Heavy weight, less volume.
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#33
(04-23-2009, 11:43 AM)Rosarium Wrote: sort of, you need volume to get mass.
We can argue this until the end of time, but it's been my experience that you don't need 'volume', if by volume you mean a high number of sets, with their corresponding reps.

Quote:Wrong. That will not help at all. Just control the calories.

What, exactly, is wrong with what I said?  Do you mean that there is no need for some kind of high intensity training, or that you don't need to lift heavy?

Quote:No, it is the same. Heavy weight, less volume.

OK, I'll be more specific.  What I mean by strength, is functional strength.  When I was in my late teens, it was all about mass, and my workouts reflected that.  Later on, I realized that, in the real world, mass was not all I thought it would be, and it really didn't help me carry my gear, climb a rock face, or subdue some 'tard so that I could cuff him.
I changed my workouts to stuff like "CrossFit", and found that these were more beneficial, and while I lost some of the bulk, I was actually stronger- I could lift more weight, for a longer period of time.

If that is wrong, then I guess my workout buddies and I were doing it wrong, and we never really gained the mass that we thought we did, nor were we as strong as we thought we were.





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#34
(04-23-2009, 12:52 PM)Texican Wrote: We can argue this until the end of time, but it's been my experience that you don't need 'volume', if by volume you mean a high number of sets, with their corresponding reps.
There are many variables, but in general, for more muscle mass gains, one needs volume to be higher. High volume isn't what is often defined in the magazines (20 sets). It can be relatively few sets.

Quote:What, exactly, is wrong with what I said?  Do you mean that there is no need for some kind of high intensity training, or that you don't need to lift heavy?
Nothing wrong with the specific statement really, but in principle. To gain muscle mass without gaining excess fat, one just has to control the calories. Your description gives a method of using those excess calories, but that is not the only way (and it is a wasteful way as well, as it involves doing more than is necessary)

Quote:OK, I'll be more specific.  What I mean by strength, is functional strength.  When I was in my late teens, it was all about mass, and my workouts reflected that.  Later on, I realized that, in the real world, mass was not all I thought it would be, and it really didn't help me carry my gear, climb a rock face, or subdue some 'tard so that I could cuff him.
I changed my workouts to stuff like "CrossFit", and found that these were more beneficial, and while I lost some of the bulk, I was actually stronger- I could lift more weight, for a longer period of time.

If that is wrong, then I guess my workout buddies and I were doing it wrong, and we never really gained the mass that we thought we did, nor were we as strong as we thought we were.

The general principles weren't right. It isn't that different. I don't know what "CrossFit" is so I can't comment on that. To get strength, by itself, it isn't that different from working for muscle mass. If I do 1 set of 5 reps of presses every day with relatively heavy weight and a progressive cycle, I will not gain much mass but gain much strength. If I do 5 sets of 5 reps with a similiar cycle, I'd be more likely to get mass. (Naturally, the exactly weights and percentages in these cycles would be different). Same idea of lifting, just with volume being the biggest difference.

It isn't wrong in that it didn't work, just wrong in being general advice. It would be wrong for me to say to gain strength without extra mass to lift 1x5, as that is not a general principle although it does work.





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#35
I guess I see what you're saying.  I include the interval training, since few of us have the time and money to perfectly control our caloric intake, as we go through our daily lives.  I will agree that, theoretically, we could simply do away with everything else, and simply lift and control our calories, and get the results we seek. 
In reality, we don't eat perfectly measured portions, nor do we workout to the point where we've used up the proper amount of calories so that we don't store excess fat. 
To strike a good balance between a caloric deficit, and excess intake, we adjust our workouts.  We don't really want to adjust our lifting, so we add an additional, non-lifting workout, that we can increase or decrease, according to our needs.

While there are 'general principles', I've come to disregard them, since I've seen too many things work, when too many people said they wouldn't.
I've known guys that were only interested in 1 rep max strength, so all they did, was 1-2 sets of 3-5 reps, with heavy weight. 
I've known guys (and girls) interested in mass, that lifted 6-10 sets of 12-15 reps, with a corresponding amount of weight.
My workout buddies and I preferred to lift heavy weight, for a low set count of about 5 (max), with anywhere from 4-8 reps, depending on the lift.
I know guys, and girls, that do mostly body-weight exercises, along with some lifting, like squats, pulls, cleans, etc,  for high reps, almost to the point of exhaustion, and while they probably won't win a Strongman competition, lift a surprisingly high amount of weight for their body size.  One 35 y.o. woman pulls 345lbs, for reps.  She weighs about 114 lbs, more or less-  I ain't asking her what she weighs, since I'm quite fond of breathing, so don't even ask.

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#36
Steroids I say! They build strength and mass.

Oh, and ham, that builds mass too.
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#37
Steroids, schmeriods, you'll wind u with ROID RAGE and a ruined body, ruined health and a load of regret, guilt and possible need to repent of abusing your God-given health.    :realmad:

As for the needs of the aging physique (different than the young somewhat) dependent upon one's genetic inheritance and gender,
I have found that whatever you can keep doing, with discipline and a measure of enjoyment, week after week, month afte rmonth, year after  year, that is what your workout should be. For some it is bicycling, for others lifting, or swimming, or yoga, or running, or dancing, or Pilates, or basball with the guys, or ______________________________ what ever works for YOU.

E.G. this 55 year old Granmama swims laps for 45 minutes 3 days a week, does QuickFit circuit Training for 45 minutes 2 days a week, and gets a long walk on the odd day out ( or if real busy, I do 30 minutes of circuit training on the  odd day.) On Sunday, day off, of course.

Ladies, what's your workout?

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#38
Aha! You said steroids are bad, but you left ham out!

Ham it is!
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