So is Sanctifying Grace created or not created?
#11
From http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropoli...grace.html

Uncreated Grace

Theologians generally speak of three forms of Uncreated Grace: the Hypostatic Union (Jn 1:14; 17), in which the Second Person of the Trinity unites with a human nature; the Indwelling Presence of God in the just soul (Jn 14:17) and the Beatific Vision (I Pt 1:13). Some add to this list the divine plan for our salvation, God's love for us, the Eucharistic Presence of Jesus' Divine nature, and the Presence of the Holy Spirit in the Church, for these are other aspects of God's manifold Self-communication to us.

Created Grace

In a sense, every gift of God is a "grace". So we sometimes say that physical life, food, etc. are "natural graces". But the term more truly applies to the supernatural gifts which establish and deepen our union with God.

Sanctifying grace is a supernatural quality which the Sacrament of Baptism confers on the human soul. It sanctifies the soul (hence its name) and elevates her beyond her mere natural abilities, thus enabling her to commune with God. This grace is permanent unless forfeited by mortal sin. Thus sanctifying grace is sometimes called habitual grace, for it is "habitually" (or constantly) present in the soul.

Actual grace is a temporary supernatural aid from God (2 Co 12:9). It enlightens the human mind and strengthens the will (2 Ti 2:1; He 13:9) enabling us to carry out a specific good work according to the Divine Will (Eph 2:10).

Cause and Effect

Though distinct, Uncreated Grace and created grace are related as Cause and effect. Each Self-communication of God to humanity produces a corresponding created grace.

In the Hypostatic Union, the Divine Word (Cause) assumes a created human nature and infuses it with a (created) grace known as the grace of the Hypostatic Union (effect). Thus Jesus is both Uncreated Grace and grace-filled humanity (2): "full of grace and truth" (Jn 1:14).

The Divine Indwelling (Cause) creates sanctifying grace (effect) in the just soul, making her a child of God and a partaker in the Divine Nature. Though still a creature, the soul mysteriously participates in the inner life of God by grace. This inner Presence is the Source/Cause of all actual graces as well.
Finally, we perceive the Beatific Vision (Cause) by means of another created supernatural grace called the light of glory (effect). This is a quality which God bestows upon the intellect, enabling it to perceive the Divine Nature directly (as Scripture puts it, to see God "face-to-face"). We will discuss the light of glory more in the third article; for now we will note that, unlike sanctifying and actual graces, which we receive in our lifetime, we do not receive the light of glory until we get to Heaven.
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#12
7HolyCats Wrote:This is a matter of semantics only.

Sanctifying Grace considered as our participation in Divine Life is clearly created, as we are a creature and our state of participation is clearly something initiated at a specific point in time. The Divine Life, in itself, is uncreated...for God. But for us, since we are created, it necessarily has a beginning or at least contingency to it.
So then is Sanctifying Grace God's Divine Nature or Something quite distrinct and different from God as Lagrange states? This does not seem like a matter semantics to me but a real question: Is Sanctifying Grace God, or, is Sanctifying Grace Something completely distinct from God? What it is in Itself?

I only ask because of this catechism by Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J.: http://www.therealpresence.org/archives/...ce_003.htm
This indicates that it has no substance in itself.
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#13
Quote:So then is Sanctifying Grace God's Divine Nature or Something quite distrinct and different from God as Lagrange states? This does not seem like a matter semantics to me but a real question: Is Sanctifying Grace God, or, is Sanctifying Grace Something completely distinct from God? What it is in Itself?

Grace isnt a "thing" like that. It's not a substance, I dont think. Sanctifying Grace is a relationship between an Uncreated Being and a created being...so...whether you call it "created" or "uncreated" depends on whether you emphasize the fact that God is eternal and uncreated, or that we are created and so that relationship has a beginning in time.
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#14
I'm struggling with this same riddle at the moment, trying to write an essay. I'm trying to defend Garrigou-LaGrange against de Lubac and Rahner, and the whole controversy is about the relationship between nature and grace. There is no simple way of describing it, that's for sure, but some ways are better than others, and some, such as Rahner's, are downright dangerous. The problem is that there were so many Thomists who took their own subtle spins on what Aquinas himself wrote about it. A lot of people don't realize that Thomism is historically not as consistent and united and faithful to Aquinas himself as the authoritative name suggests. Even a staunch defender such as G-LaGrange implicitly criticizes those on his "side" from time to time. It's probably been the most difficult and controversial topic in theology since year dot. It's hard to find terms to use that don't potentially lead to error.
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#15


(04-22-2009, 05:24 PM)7HolyCats Wrote:
Quote:So then is Sanctifying Grace God's Divine Nature or Something quite distrinct and different from God as Lagrange states? This does not seem like a matter semantics to me but a real question: Is Sanctifying Grace God, or, is Sanctifying Grace Something completely distinct from God? What it is in Itself?

Grace isnt a "thing" like that. It's not a substance, I dont think. Sanctifying Grace is a relationship between an Uncreated Being and a created being...so...whether you call it "created" or "uncreated" depends on whether you emphasize the fact that God is eternal and uncreated, or that we are created and so that relationship has a beginning in time.

According to CCC Part3 Chapter3 Article 2

"Grace is favor, the free and undeserved help that God gives us to respond to his call to become children of God, adoptive sons, partakers of the divine nature and of eternal life.

The grace of Christ is the gratuitous gift that God makes to us of his own life, infused by the Holy Spirit into our soul to heal it of sin and to sanctify it. It is the sanctifying or deifying grace received in Baptism. It is in us the source of the work of sanctification.

Sanctifying grace is an habitual gift, a stable and supernatural disposition that perfects the soul itself to enable it to live with God, to act by his love. Habitual grace, the permanent disposition to live and act in keeping with God's call, is distinguished from actual graces which refer to God's interventions, whether at the beginning of conversion or in the course of the work of sanctification."

I'd say grace, is created and willed by God.  ;D
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#16
(04-22-2009, 05:24 PM)7HolyCats Wrote:
Quote:So then is Sanctifying Grace God's Divine Nature or Something quite distrinct and different from God as Lagrange states? This does not seem like a matter semantics to me but a real question: Is Sanctifying Grace God, or, is Sanctifying Grace Something completely distinct from God? What it is in Itself?
Grace isnt a "thing" like that. It's not a substance, I dont think. Sanctifying Grace is a relationship between an Uncreated Being and a created being...so...whether you call it "created" or "uncreated" depends on whether you emphasize the fact that God is eternal and uncreated, or that we are created and so that relationship has a beginning in time.
So is there anything wrong in considering Sanctifying Grace to be the "Uncreated Divine Attributes" as the East was want to call it? I mean the Virtues we practice are not created, right? But rather are the Divine Attributes of God? Scriptures say "God is Charity", does that mean that when we love we love with God's Essence?
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#17
Quote:So is there anything wrong in considering Sanctifying Grace to be the "Uncreated Divine Attributes" as the East was want to call it? I mean the Virtues we practice are not created, right? But rather are the Divine Attributes of God? Scriptures say "God is Charity", does that mean that when we love we love with God's Essence?

I dont know. I'd imagine there'd be two ways to phrase it. Is an uncreated Form stamped on created Matter a created substance or uncreated? Are we talking about the Form or the Instantiation of it? Most of these issues with the Orthodox are semantic, see.
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#18
(04-28-2009, 08:11 PM)7HolyCats Wrote:
Quote:So is there anything wrong in considering Sanctifying Grace to be the "Uncreated Divine Attributes" as the East was want to call it? I mean the Virtues we practice are not created, right? But rather are the Divine Attributes of God? Scriptures say "God is Charity", does that mean that when we love we love with God's Essence?

I dont know. I'd imagine there'd be two ways to phrase it. Is an uncreated Form stamped on created Matter a created substance or uncreated? Are we talking about the Form or the Instantiation of it? Most of these issues with the Orthodox are semantic, see.

Yeah, I think it's semantics. It's hard for me to wrap my mind around these kinds of topics. I mean, when St. Paul says we are "temples of the Holy Spirit" are we to take that literally or metaphorically?

As for "God is Charity" (and I'm probably misunderstanding the question) it was always explained to me that for God- love is a NOUN (He IS Love), and for humans-love is a VERB. We respond to God's essence and He becomes active in our lives.

- Lisa
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#19
7HolyCats Wrote:
Quote:So is there anything wrong in considering Sanctifying Grace to be the "Uncreated Divine Attributes" as the East was want to call it? I mean the Virtues we practice are not created, right? But rather are the Divine Attributes of God? Scriptures say "God is Charity", does that mean that when we love we love with God's Essence?
I dont know. I'd imagine there'd be two ways to phrase it. Is an uncreated Form stamped on created Matter a created substance or uncreated? Are we talking about the Form or the Instantiation of it? Most of these issues with the Orthodox are semantic, see.
I understand that a lot of the issues with the Eastern Schismatics (they are not really orthodox!) are just semantical but that they are outside the Church is not at all semantics. As well there really is a real difficulty here. Sanctifying Grace cannot be both created and uncreated, lest we break the Law of Non-contradiction. So which is It?
If It is God living within us, then I cannot see how it can be created.
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#20
"Semantics" is the point - it's almost impossible to write a sentence about it that does justice to it, though we all know what the truth is in our hearts/ souls. How can you best say it? This has been the source of a lot of issues, both by those who try to define the truth and by those who like to exploit language to suit their own ends. Look at the early Fathers and you'll see some pretty heretical statements about this topic, and the heretical statements still exist today, even by those who are trying to sort it out. It's a very hard thing to say, and a very easy thing to exploit.
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