Are midwives safe?
#11
(04-23-2009, 12:37 AM)didishroom Wrote: There's no reason anyone should have to pay tens of thousands of dollars for a doctor to put out his hands and say, "it's a girl/boy!"
Childbirth is NOT a disease or sickness. It's natural.

Your right. For the prenatal care alone, it's approx $4500. The Hospital bill should be somewhere from $5-10k. That's if there aren't any complications. It's sickening.
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#12
(04-23-2009, 04:57 PM)antimodernist Wrote: Your right. For the prenatal care alone, it's approx $4500. The Hospital bill should be somewhere from $5-10k. That's if there aren't any complications. It's sickening.

That's getting off easy - my insurance got billed around $6000 for prenatal care, and $12000 for delivery {which I might add was done by a student doc!}.

A midwife would have been $2500 total for everything, including breastfeeding support for the year after birth.
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#13
I have never used a mid-wife but have heard amazing birth stories about them.

In my area, there seems to be a rash of "doulas" popping up. Apparently there is no qualification or national standards for this profession. I am aware of 3 through a mom's group that I belong to. one had a c-section, did not breast-feed and works at an abortion clinic as her day job. She sent away her $19.95 and got a packet from some group and is now calling herself a professional.

Not dissing mid-wives (I am pretty sure they have national standards) just throwing out what I have found out....
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#14
(04-23-2009, 05:30 PM)leome Wrote: I have never used a mid-wife but have heard amazing birth stories about them.

In my area, there seems to be a rash of "doulas" popping up. Apparently there is no qualification or national standards for this profession. I am aware of 3 through a mom's group that I belong to. one had a c-section, did not breast-feed and works at an abortion clinic as her day job. She sent away her $19.95 and got a packet from some group and is now calling herself a professional.

Not dissing mid-wives (I am pretty sure they have national standards) just throwing out what I have found out....

Well midwives and doulas have absolutely nothing to do with one another.  A doula simply offers female physical and emotional support during labor.
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#15
If we have our baby via midwife, it will only be $1800.
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#16
Homebirths have been statistically proven to be safer than hospital births, even if there are complications.  There's less risk of infection, and less risk of interventions that lead to cesarean section.

If you don't want to take the time to research, I highly recommend "The Business of Being Born" a documentary about the atrocious state of obstetrical care in the US.  It's not that doctors mean to do poorly, they're simply taught to look at things as a disease and have a tendency to treat pregnancy as a diseased state. 
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#17
I don't know about midwifery as a career, but I wonder if I can set up a small extra income by being something like a professional birthing photographer. I mean, don't you just hate those grainy post-natal photos where you're in an ugly patterned smock, more cords strapped to you than the back of a PC, and your hair is just icky? See, I was thinking of maybe converting my garage into a birthing studio. When you're ready to have a baby, I can taxi you to my studio which will be set up like a Baroque bedchamber with the perfect drapery and lighting for the best photographs. I'd also have a makeup counter set up on wheels, and of course have only the finest birthing gowns. There'll be soothing classical music piped through the speakers and a number of attendants in period servant dress to address you as "madame" and serve you chocolates and other refreshments.

What do you think?
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#18
(04-23-2009, 09:20 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I don't know about midwifery as a career, but I wonder if I can set up a small extra income by being something like a professional birthing photographer. I mean, don't you just hate those grainy post-natal photos where you're in an ugly patterned smock, more cords strapped to you than the back of a PC, and your hair is just icky? See, I was thinking of maybe converting my garage into a birthing studio. When you're ready to have a baby, I can taxi you to my studio which will be set up like a Baroque bedchamber with the perfect drapery and lighting for the best photographs. I'd also have a makeup counter set up on wheels, and of course have only the finest birthing gowns. There'll be soothing classical music piped through the speakers and a number of attendants in period servant dress to address you as "madame" and serve you chocolates and other refreshments.

What do you think?

Only you, THK, only you.

Trust me - when you're in labor you DON'T want to go anywhere - well except me because I didn't feel a bit of it {thank you pinched nerves in my spine - it's the ONLY time they came in handy!}.

Actually there is a HUGE market for pregnancy and birth photography - I know a woman locally who does that for a living.
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#19
(04-23-2009, 09:20 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I don't know about midwifery as a career, but I wonder if I can set up a small extra income by being something like a professional birthing photographer. I mean, don't you just hate those grainy post-natal photos where you're in an ugly patterned smock, more cords strapped to you than the back of a PC, and your hair is just icky? See, I was thinking of maybe converting my garage into a birthing studio. When you're ready to have a baby, I can taxi you to my studio which will be set up like a Baroque bedchamber with the perfect drapery and lighting for the best photographs. I'd also have a makeup counter set up on wheels, and of course have only the finest birthing gowns. There'll be soothing classical music piped through the speakers and a number of attendants in period servant dress to address you as "madame" and serve you chocolates and other refreshments.

What do you think?


@_@  Umm.....awkward.......
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#20
(04-23-2009, 06:56 PM)antimodernist Wrote: If we have our baby via midwife, it will only be $1800.

I'm just wondering if your wife is on board with the midwife route. If she isn't, $1800 bucks isn't going to matter.

It takes a lot of preparation to have a homebirth, and it takes a lot of reading and meetings with the midwife to be comfortable with her for the birth. Plus, you need to be prepared for an onslaught of questions from shocked and horrified relatives.
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