Holy Food
#1
I'm trying to collect recipes having to do with saints and other holy things, maybe invent a few. (I'm working out the details for a grilled sandwich called the St. Lawrence.)

I know about madeleines for Mary Magdalene (but do they really have anything to do with her?) palmiers for Palm Sunday, Lucy's cats for St. Lucy. What else is out there?
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#2
[Image: pink_sprinkled_donut.jpg]
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#3
All right, Walberg, you smartass, keep it up and I won't invent a St. Walburga dessert for you.
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#4
Lamb and Stuffed Grape Leaves (maybe some Falafel as well): Our Lord and Our Lady
Boiled Eggs Dyed Red : St. Mary Magdalene
Steam/Baked Fish : St. Raphael the Archangel (With onions and other items,mmm... I have a meal planned for tomorrow with Red Snapper mmm...)
Sweet Bread: St. Elizabeth of Hungary
Hot Cross Buns : St. Francis of Assisi (I have this thing with Bread and Franciscans)
Sweet Bread: St.Anthony of Padua/Lisboa
Bread: St. Benedict (I'd go with something with Rosemary as it has an herby flavour. The reason being that there was an attempt to poison him.)
Baklava and Apples: St.Nicholas



I'll think of some more later and post them tomorrow (GOD willing).
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#5
Satori, do you have A Continual Feast?

gotta get it if you don't.

Evelyn Birge Vitz
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#6
Rebecca, you might like this recipe for braided bread in honor of your daughter's namesake - St. Lucy!

[Image: 1202_braid_bread.jpg]
On December 13, Saint Lucia Day, your family can pay homage to the fourth-century saint remembered for her hospitality. This festive bread is inspired by the candle-covered crown she is said to have worn to light her way as she brought food to the poor.

INGREDIENTS

Dough
1 1/2 cups milk
2 1/4-ounce packages active dry yeast
1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
6 tablespoons butter, cut into pieces
2 large eggs
1/4 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon finely grated orange rind
1 teaspoon salt
5 1/2 o 6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Glaze and Garnish:
2 1/2 cups confectioner's sugar
2 1/2 to 3 1/2 tablespoons orange juice
1/3 cup dried cranberries
Candles (optional)

Warm the milk in a small saucepan, then pour 1/2 cup of it into a large bowl. Add the yeast and 1 tablespoon of the sugar and let it set for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, melt the butter in the remaining milk.

Add the butter and milk mixture to the yeast mixture. Whisk in the eggs, juice, 1/4 cup of sugar, orange rind, and salt. Stir in the flour, 1 cup at a time, until the dough can be gathered into a ball.

Knead the dough on a floured surface for 10 minutes, adding more flour until the dough is smooth and elastic and does not stick to your hands. Transfer the dough to an oiled bowl, turning it once to coat it. Loosely cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it rise until doubled in size, about 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down the dough and divide it into 3 equal parts. Roll each part into a 30-inch rope and braid the ropes together. Transfer the braid to a greased baking sheet, pinch together the ends to form a circle, and let it rise until it has again doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

Heat the oven to 375°. Bake the bread for 25 minutes or until golden brown, then let it cool on a wire rack for about 30 minutes.

For the glaze, stir together the confectioner's sugar and orange juice in a medium bowl until smooth. Drizzle the glaze mix over the bread, then garnish with the cranberries. Finally, add candles, if you'd like. Serves 12.
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#7
Ha! And here's another one you could have used today (yesterday if you read this tomorrow).

Recipes for St. George Day (April 23).

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/content/recip...ges_day/1/


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#8
Great idea for a thread! The only thing I can think of is "Qaghaq tal-Ghasel", traditionally served at Christmas though it's available throughout the year too. It's supposed to remind us of the apostles (probably because there are twelve holes in the pastry): http://searchmalta.com/christmas/qaghaq.shtml

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#9
Melita, are you sure that pastry's edible? It looks like it's made out of terra cotta! But with those ingredients, it must be delicious. How do you pronounce the name?

I am so bummed I missed St. George's Day, being an anglophile. But shouldn't his name day treat be something dragony? Alligator pear salad, turtle soup, grilled swordfish, and then a cake that looks like a dragon's head, maybe.
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#10
From the title of the thread I thought, Holy Foods, Batman! But that's not what you meant...

I was thinking of St George's Day, too, but Lisa beat me to it. I have a recipe for St George's Cake. I bought a pretty cool calendar from St Angelus Press that has lots of recipes on it, I also have a Catholic cookbook, which is neat to look at but the recipes go right over my head (I think it's meant for people who already know how to cook).

You've gotta make St Martin's Day croissants in November (or do like I do and buy the can of refrigerated ones that "pop" open under pressure. Fun!).
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