Holy Food
#11
:laughing: that is a pretty bad picture of it... though really it's not the most attractive of desserts anyway. It does taste delicious though and has been traditional here for ages. Though I like the thought of coming up with new ideas, your "St Lawrence grilled sandwiches" sound brilliant (if a little morbid...)

So far as approximating 'Qaghaq tal-Ghasel' into English, it would sound something like 'Aa-ka tal Aasel'. But with several glottal stops. 'Treacle Rings' (the name under which tourists buy them) is less authentic, but a lot easier to say!
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#12
I make a barbeque sauce that I call my "St. Lawrence Sauce".  It's good, but it takes a long time to make correctly.
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#13
Please give me your recipe, Joe. The old man and I dig a good barbecue.
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#14
I showed my husband this thread . . .  He and my daughter asked if communion donuts were possible!  Wow . . .  Pray for them both; they need it!  ???
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#15
Communion dounts?!!

Not since Paul VI.
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#16
I read up about different traditions of Epiphany cakes from different countries.  What they have in common is that something is that they are in the shape of a crown and something such as a figuring of the Christ child or other objects edible or not are baked in them.

What I have done the past few years to start our own family tradition is make a caramel cake in a bundt pan and put an almond for the "lucky" person to find.  My little girls just love Epiphany cake.
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#17
I always serve Sloppy St. Joseph's instead of Sloppy Joes.  It was a joke we started in grade school and I just love it.
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#18
How about making a brunch for St. Benedict and serve Eggs Benedict?
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#19
There's another traditional type of food we call them 'zeppoli'. They get served one day of the year on the feast of St Joseph. Here's a link to the Italian version: http://www.glamour.demon.co.uk/recipes/23.htm the Maltese version is filled with sweet ricotta rather than cream/cherries.

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#20
(04-29-2009, 03:35 PM)Melita Wrote: There's another traditional type of food we call them 'zeppoli'. They get served one day of the year on the feast of St Joseph. Here's a link to the Italian version: http://www.glamour.demon.co.uk/recipes/23.htm the Maltese version is filled with sweet ricotta rather than cream/cherries.

Melita, thank you. We will be making these. This sounds goooood.
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