How bad would a Novus Ordo Mass have to be to justify not attending?
(05-22-2009, 12:15 AM)Libertas Wrote: Thanks! That is good to know! I was a little bit embarrassed.  :-[

According to Vatican II documents, the use of Latin was to be spread and knowledge of it increased by the laity. The use of the vulgar tongues would only be done when necessary, like with missionaries.
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I always say the responses in Latin at the NO so don't feel embarrassed.
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You people are nuts.  Libetas has the right idea..just stop going to the NO.  If you have a TLM site you lovin' it.

Otherwise faith gets endangerd as evidenced by the millions upon million who just don't care any more.
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I went to my first NO in several months this week, for my niece's Confirmation.  I had thought I might accidentally respond in Latin, but really, it was so different there wasn't much chance of that.  Besides, there was so much activity in the pew in front of me that I couldn't get immersed in the prayers anyway.  There were two parents and three kids, so whichever kid wasn't actually in their grasp was in constant movement and picking on the other kids or the parents.  I tried to keep my gaze elevated most of the time so I didn't have to watch the fun.  Up there was the Risen Christ, no Cross in sight.  I did finally notice a portable crucifix to one side of the sanctuary; I wondered whether it's always there or they brought it in for the Bishop's visit.

Apparently spaghetti strap dresses and untucked shirts are standard dress code these days for receiving important Sacraments from your Bishop, and shorts and t-shirts are fine for the attendees.

This church was built in 1972, and I wonder if the kneelers were designed to discourage kneeling.  They're too close to the pew, so you have to sort of lean back, and there isn't room for your feet if the kneeler behind you isn't in use.  A Low Mass there would be downright painful.

It wasn't bad enough to walk out, considering the special occasion, although I did consider moving across the aisle when it was time to kneel, to get away from the wrestling family, but I decided that might be kind of obvious.  If it were my only choice for Sunday Mass....I don't know, I think I'd need a lot of Grace to stick it out.
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(05-22-2009, 05:23 PM)Mhoram Wrote: Apparently spaghetti strap dresses and untucked shirts are standard dress code these days for receiving important Sacraments from your Bishop, and shorts and t-shirts are fine for the attendees.

Sounds like I need to switch religions!  We only get a couple of well dressed folks and a bunch of the frump-a-dump.  Trads scaring of convertee prospects I guess.  Makes you want to go to a Baptist fellowship.

Of course, I'm part of the problem in my chapel as far as some would be concerned.  My typical dress is blue jeans and one of my swank Kennith Cole shirts untucked,  Sorry Erin, no flipflops.
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(05-22-2009, 12:24 AM)Rosarium Wrote: According to Vatican II documents, the use of Latin was to be spread and knowledge of it increased by the laity. The use of the vulgar tongues would only be done when necessary, like with missionaries.

36. 1. Particular law remaining in force, the use of the Latin language is to be preserved in the Latin rites.

36. 4. Translations from the Latin text into the mother tongue intended for use in the liturgy must be approved by the competent territorial ecclesiastical authority mentioned above.

54 ...  Nevertheless steps should be taken so that the faithful may also be able to say or to sing together in Latin those parts of the Ordinary of the Mass which pertain to them.

91 ... The work of revising the psalter, already happily begun, is to be finished as soon as possible, and is to take into account the style of Christian Latin, the liturgical use of psalms, also when sung, and the entire tradition of the Latin Church.

101. 1 101. 1. In accordance with the centuries-old tradition of the Latin rite, the Latin language is to be retained by clerics in the divine office. But in individual cases the ordinary has the power of granting the use of a vernacular translation to those clerics for whom the use of Latin constitutes a grave obstacle to their praying the office properly.

http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_counc...um_en.html

These are all relevant occurrences of the world Lating in the Sacrosanctum Concilium




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