Fast Food Is Protestant?
#1
Not my opinion..just the authors.. :popcorn:
http://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultura...tm#manners
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#2
never mind- now I see it.
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#3
his name is Salani at the beginning of the article, but it's Salami by the end.

coincidence?

....I think not.


:P
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#4
This is unfortunate. The author actually has the start of a good premise, then to go and throw a fast food loop makes the whole idea scorn-worthy.
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#5
Warning! Warning! TIA ALERT! BRAIN MUSHING ALERT!
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#6
I like the article!  :)

"There is an appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heavens." (Eccl 3:1). I think time is grace. A table family meal is a blessing. How lonely is the soul that eats alone. Can't imagine 'instant communion", "instant confession", dial an "instant prayer", an all-in-one instant religion developing!
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#7
Meh, I like my Burger King, Wendy's, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, thank you very much.

But I do agree with the importance of family meals.

But now half of my siblings are married and the rest of us are working/in college with all different schedules. Family meals don't exist anymore on any kind of a regular basis.
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#8
Give that author a gold medal for the logic long-jump! Choosing what to have for dinner is exactly like choosing interpretations of the Bible.
Great, now I want Chipotle..............
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#9
I liked the article too. And that first picture of the big Italian family sitting down to dinner is awesome!

Yes, we in America have lost the art of long meals and fresh foods, familial conversations a la mode. I remember the big Sunday gatherings at grandma's house after Mass. Sunday was THE DAY for the huge supper that took all morning and afternoon to prepare. Nobody was allowed in the kitchen except for the Cook (grandma - she used to "shoo!" us out) but after dinner and dessert and overdosing on coffee, the kitchen was crowded with all the women doing dishes. It was great because the dishes got done quick and it was excuse to engage in "girl-talk" (gossip). Inevitably, someone always dropped and broke a plate (the good china) and we even took bets to see who would win the Butter Fingers of the Week Award.

Now grandma is gone and I don't cook. The grandkids spend Sundays playing sports and afterwards we all go out for pizza and Coke. The kids don't know what they're missing so how can they miss what they don't know? But I know. And I miss those days. And I miss grandma's cooking. And I miss grandma... I'm depressed now.  I think I'll order a pizza. 

*sigh*  :(

- Lisa
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#10
(05-09-2009, 06:03 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I liked the article too. And that first picture of the big Italian family sitting down to dinner is awesome!

Yes, we in America have lost the art of long meals and fresh foods, familial conversations a la mode. I remember the big Sunday gatherings at grandma's house after Mass. Sunday was THE DAY for the huge supper that took all morning and afternoon to prepare. Nobody was allowed in the kitchen except for the cook (grandma - she used to "shoo!" us out) but after dinner and dessert and overdosing on coffee, the kitchen was crowded with all the women doing dishes. It was great because the dishes got done quick and it was excuse to engage in "girl-talk" (gossip). Inevitably, someone always dropped and broke a plate (the good china) and we even took bets to see who would win the Butter Fingers of the Week Award.

Now grandma is gone and I don't cook. The grandkids spend Sundays playing sports and afterwards we all go out for pizza and Coke. The kids don't know what they're missing so how can they miss what they don't know? But I know. And I miss those days. And I miss grandma's cooking. And I miss grandma... I'm depressed now.  I think I'll order a pizza. 

*sigh*  :(

- Lisa

Oh Lisa  :awww: At least you have those marvelous memories to treasure!

We don't do the big Sunday lunch thing either, my mother used to spend the day cooking but now we go out (the choice of restaurant shuffles amongst us each week), though it is a long draw out affair with lots of chattering. I do love big dinners with all the family, but they're pretty rare, mainly Christmas, Easter or big occasions like that. It is a shame that part of our culture is gone, but I think people's expectations have changed too. Hopefully a return to that way of living is on the cards, even if it does mean lots of work (there aren't many women like your grandmother left!) and tighter-knit extended families.
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