Fast Food Is Protestant?
#11
(05-09-2009, 06:15 PM)Melita Wrote: and tighter-knit extended families.

I think you really summed it up there in the lack of tighter-knit extended families. That's what's missing today. We're all s-p-r-e-a-d out, and those of us still huddled together aren't forced to make conversation anymore. I can remember grandma blaming television (the "idiot box") for destroying family intimacy. What would she think if she were alive today, what with people in the same room text messaging and emailing each other?

I forgot to mention that grandma was a late convert to the Faith. Most of her life she was a Protestant, and she would have preferred a hole in the head to fast-food (if such food existed then). So I don't know that Catholics hold the title to big family meals. It's just that we've been around a lot longer and are better at it.

Anyone seen Babette's Feast? :)

- Lisa

Reply
#12
(05-09-2009, 06:30 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(05-09-2009, 06:15 PM)Melita Wrote: and tighter-knit extended families.

I think you really summed it up there in the lack of tighter-knit extended families. That's what's missing today. We're all s-p-r-e-a-d out, and those of us still huddled together aren't forced to make conversation anymore. I can remember grandma blaming television (the "idiot box") for destroying family intimacy. What would she think if she were alive today, what with people in the same room text messaging and emailing each other?

I forgot to mention that grandma was a late convert to the Faith. Most of her life she was a Protestant, and she would have preferred a hole in the head to fast-food (if such food existed then). So I don't know that Catholics hold the title to big family meals. It's just that we've been around a lot longer and are better at it.

Anyone seen Babette's Feast? :)

- Lisa

It's also nearly impossible to have a big family meal now that divorce is the norm.
Reply
#13
Actually, buffets are protestant.  There is everything you could possibly want and you can pick and choose as you please.
Reply
#14
(05-09-2009, 06:30 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Anyone seen Babette's Feast? :)

- Lisa

oh, yes.

:asianbow:
Reply
#15
(05-09-2009, 06:30 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(05-09-2009, 06:15 PM)Melita Wrote: and tighter-knit extended families.

I think you really summed it up there in the lack of tighter-knit extended families. That's what's missing today. We're all s-p-r-e-a-d out, and those of us still huddled together aren't forced to make conversation anymore. I can remember grandma blaming television (the "idiot box") for destroying family intimacy. What would she think if she were alive today, what with people in the same room text messaging and emailing each other?

I forgot to mention that grandma was a late convert to the Faith. Most of her life she was a Protestant, and she would have preferred a hole in the head to fast-food (if such food existed then). So I don't know that Catholics hold the title to big family meals. It's just that we've been around a lot longer and are better at it.

Anyone seen Babette's Feast? :)

- Lisa

My paternal family are all Yankee Protestants (except the ones we've converted!) and they scowl upon fast food and also expound about "the idiot box."  Yes, still.  I don't have cable, and they're so proud!  My one aunt had a box by the door where people were meant to put their cell phones whenever they arrived at her house.  I might reinstate that, it was a good idea.  I should mention that the other Protestants looked askance at my grandmother because she was the only person in her DAR chapter with more than three kids - she had five sons and four daughters, plus grandpa was a widower when she married him so there were two more boys.  Yes, eleven.  :laughing:

One particular tradition I'd like to revive, but where will I find the people?,  was that on holidays when the weather was good they'd move the big wooden table outside into the back yard and have a whopping great multigenerational feast.  Sometimes there would be close to a hundred people there, but usually not at the same time, and everybody brought food so they never ran out. 

The Catholic side of the family ate like that all of the time because they were too poor to afford a table where everyone could sit at once. :laughing:
Reply
#16
I make a big sit down meal every Sunday. I spend the whole day cooking it. I don't like fast food very much, but during the week I do try to keep it a little more simple. I have to. The weekends are  different, I like to fuss.

I liked the article very much. I've read it before. I agree with it on the whole. Food should be treated with respect.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
Reply
#17
Sunday is a day of rest.  I make pizza or we eat leftovers  :laughing:
Reply
#18
(05-14-2009, 10:13 AM)ErinIsNice Wrote: Sunday is a day of rest.  I make pizza or we eat leftovers  :laughing:

It's also a day to do things you enjoy. I happen to like cooking.

Edited to add: I like to have extended family over for dinner on Sundays, too. Usually about once a month or so.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
Reply
#19
Nothing more?

What is more important than the meal? Doesn't the least observant man-about-town look upon the implementation and ritual progress of a meal as a liturgical prescription? Isn't all of civilization apparent in these careful preparations, which consecrate the spirit's triumph over raging appetite?- Valéry
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
Reply
#20
(05-14-2009, 08:33 AM)Magnificat Wrote: My paternal family are all Yankee Protestants (except the ones we've converted!) and they scowl upon fast food and also expound about "the idiot box."   Yes, still.   I don't have cable, and they're so proud!  My one aunt had a box by the door where people were meant to put their cell phones whenever they arrived at her house.  I might reinstate that, it was a good idea. 

Even before I decided to convert to Catholicism I had this notion that the TV was almost inherently evil, ha...I haven't had television for years - when I visit someone who has it (which is everyone else in the civilized world) I find it to be a massive distraction. Not to mention all the imprudent stuff one is almost forced to be subjected to. I not especially prude, and I'm only 22 so it's not like I am nostalgic about the good ol' days, but seeing scantily-clad women in commercials or on virtually every mainline TV station's programming doesn't assist in me remaining chaste. To top it off, the shows on now should be embarrasing to us as a culture as well as our methods of advertising.

I'm also not fond of cell phones either, ha. (Maybe I was born on the wrong side of the century) I'd rather not be available 24/7 with everyone expecting you to always have your phone on you.

Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)