exercise
#11
(05-09-2009, 09:49 PM)Rosarium Wrote: I highly doubt that.

I could say I gained 5 lbs of muscle doing absolutely nothing special for 6 months and tell the truth, but not given any meaningful advice.

Situps and crunches won't diminish abdominal adipose tissue.


Like I said it worked for me, but for me it was more of a return to stomach muscles, rather than a first development of them, I used to do Taekwondo when I was a kid, up unitl the age of about 16/17..........sadly my later teen years were filled with way too much beer, and vodka, and whiskey, but most of all good ol Guinness - the real belly-giver.

Try it anyway, theres no substitute for a bit of old fashioned hard work! You got people with all these 'diets' and alternative theories. Nobody has ever failed if they just do a bit of hard work!
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#12
(05-10-2009, 01:17 AM)kzarah Wrote: Rosarium
    Thanks for the advice but I don't want to build muscle (or increase my waist size) or my clothes won't fit.  I need to put on fat just not in the waist line.  I also need to improve y posture.  I don't know if any of you have been through this before but, when you are larger you tend to lean back to balance your self.  When you loose the weight you still tend to lean back and push your stomach out.  

It is all a piece of the same puzzle. You won't build a lot of muscle, but you'll strengthen them. If you gain weight easily, you can reduce the total sets to 2.

Posture is a chain of body parts from the heels to the top of the head. You do not fix it by working on parts of the chain. If anything, doing specific exercises would make your posture worse by causing imbalances.
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#13
This is the best piece of equipment to work your abs:

[Image: 25699.jpg]


To improve your posture, you should do yoga.

I also recommend a muscle building program after this.  I always laugh when you give people this advice and they're scared they'll become too big, as if they can develop into Arnold Schwarzenegger overnight. 




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#14
(05-10-2009, 08:53 PM)PeterII Wrote: This is the best piece of equipment to work your abs:

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d83/sa.../25699.jpg

I also recommend a muscle building program after this.  I always laugh when you give people this advice and they're scared they'll become too big, as if they can develop into Arnold Schwarzenegger overnight.   

That is a great tool, however, without the necessary strength it can do more harm than good, so always take it slowly and within one's abilities.

To properly use it, one must keep their abs flat. To get this feel, lie on a flat hard surface and press your lowerback into the ground (this is a good exercise in its own right). This is the way the abs should be when using the wheel. Hunched forward. If one's back caves in during use, then stop. To graduate its difficult, you can face a wall so you can't go down all the way. The strong you get, move further from the wall until you have the strength and coordination to go nose to ground and back.

After that, on your knees, work on doing a standing wheel.
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#15
PeterII
    I have seen those before.  I'll bet it takes some practice but it could be useful for a guy like me.  Also, I have closet space for that as opposed to free weights. 

    It would also be useful to play wheel barrel in the drive way. 

Daniel


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#16
(05-11-2009, 12:54 AM)kzarah Wrote: PeterII
     I have seen those before.  I'll bet it takes some practice but it could be useful for a guy like me.  Also, I have closet space for that as opposed to free weights. 

    It would also be useful to play wheel barrel in the drive way. 

Daniel

I bought mine for $8 at Walmart, so you can't go wrong.  They're real simple to use, and you'll feel the burn right away.  You can just roll out and in for as long as you can, or use a techniqe where you roll out slowly for 10 seconds, hold for a couple seconds, and roll back in slowly to the starting point in 10 seconds.  You only need to do that three or four times.  I've found the ab wheel and a chin up bar to be the most effective and efficient exercise tools out there. 

   
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#17
(05-11-2009, 02:17 AM)PeterII Wrote: I've found ... and a chin up bar to be the most effective and efficient exercise tools out there.   

+1 And pullups are good ab exercises in their own right.

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#18
(05-11-2009, 12:44 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(05-11-2009, 02:17 AM)PeterII Wrote: I've found ... and a chin up bar to be the most effective and efficient exercise tools out there.   

+1 And pullups are good ab exercises in their own right.

I wonder what you'd think of bar dips. I ask because I've often wondered if they're bad for the shoulder. My shoulder joint tends to hurt when doing them regularly.
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#19
better than the dips that stand at the bar.... those don't hurt your shoulder, only your pride.
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#20
(05-11-2009, 02:03 PM)Iuvenalis Wrote: I wonder what you'd think of bar dips. I ask because I've often wondered if they're bad for the shoulder. My shoulder joint tends to hurt when doing them regularly.

That is a tricky question.

I believe the human body works as a unit (science supports that too) and that any natural movement (meaning, it uses the joints and muscles in a way which they were designed.) is never "bad". However, when we try to use certain movements in an articifical way, we often go beyond our design or try to use our body in a way which is entirely appropriate, but in a way we are not ready (a normal human body can do splits, pullups, and backflips, but how many can actually do these in the modern world?)

So for bar dips, it is important to stay within the flexibility of the shoulders. The risk is stretching ligaments (not muscles) which are not designed to stretch at all (well, they have some tolerance, but training them in such a way is never a good idea). So for par dips, if you stay within your ability, you will be safe. To test this, do an "air dip" and see how far back your arm can go. Do not use force to go beyond that. Gravity should not be forcing your body to do anything; you should have total control.

As an exercise, they work, but unlike pullups, I would not consider them to be an essential movement. It is not a movement which is that useful in real life. A pushup (which a dip is) going more forward (classic pushup), on an incline (elevated feet) or a handstand will work the same muscles in a safer and more productive way I think.
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