Bad conversations
#21
Yeah, what he said..
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#22
what they said - especially WRC and Scipio.

Gross humor can be very, very funny. So can immoral humor, which is why we shouldn't watch or partake in it. You can either do what you did, or try to point out some things wrong with the film to make them think a little without them condemning you for having morals.

"HaHaHa...then, he took off his pants and..... while his fiance was having a fit, and then the other woman......"

Give a thoughtful look, and "Man. Could you imagine if that happened in real life?! Imagine what that guy's going to have to wake up to - let alone what he's going to have to explain to his future kids and God.

Man." 

Then cheerfully walk off and have a coke ( not pepsi).
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#23
(06-09-2009, 11:10 AM)Rosarium Wrote: I didn't see the movie and I don't know what they show.

http://www.kids-in-mind.com

This is a very good resource for determining whether the contents of mass-market films are objectionable. They rate films on a 1-10 scale with respect to three areas: sexual content, violence, and profanity. More than that, they give account of every objectionable instance within the films.

It is much more helpful than the MPAA ratings, which have gradually become more lenient over the years, and fail to account for just why a movie might pose moral danger.

Here is a link to the content review of the film in question:
http://kids-in-mind.com/h/hangover.htm
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#24
(06-09-2009, 11:30 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: http://www.kids-in-mind.com

This is a very good resource for determining whether the contents of mass-market films are objectionable. They rate films on a 1-10 scale with respect to three areas: sexual content, violence, and profanity. More than that, they give account of every objectionable instance within the films.
Thanks. It is a little weird though, as it doesn't really describe what really happens. I looked at the listing for a film that is almost squeaky clean, and they mention things I would have never considered (and certainly nothing a child would find weird) and then a film which is very inappopriate, and they seem too focused on dry descriptions. I suppose if you got a hang of their rating criteria it would be useful.

I also looked at the entry for Blade and its says "Wesley Snipes stars as an immortal warrior who battles a thriving underworld of vampires seeking to decimate the human race.", which is factually wrong on several accounts. First, Wesley Snipes plays a character who is not immortal and ages like a normal human (this is stressed in the movie), and he battles not the underworld of vampires who seek to destroy the human race (the underworld of vampires explicitly doesn't want to destroy the human race and has treaties to that effect), but a sub section which isn't part of that underworld who are quite open in their efforts.

Not that this matters, I just felt a need to post it :)
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#25
(06-09-2009, 09:22 AM)CarmeliteAtHeart Wrote: Does anyone have any advice, or even better advice from the Saints, on how to handle it when people talk about things that are immoral or offensive around you? Must we always speak up or can we just not engage the conversation? In particular I ask in the situation of being at work where to object could cause more disruption than it would if we were out having a beer outside of work.

Any advice or sources from the Saints would be appreciated! I'm just not sure what I am obligated to do or what I should try to do.

Pax Christi tecum.

Make the sign of the cross, a powerful sacramental
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