What are you reading right now?
Myself:
An Introduction To The Devout Life by St Francis de Sales
From Judgement To Passion by Rachel Fulton Brown

With Wife:
Narnia: Prince Caspian by CS Lewis
Advice For Successful Families by Fr Alain Delagneau
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I just finished Dostoevsky's early novel, The Double. It was a very entertaining read, always kept me guessing, although it did slow down a bit in the second half. Its pace was much faster than what you would typically expect from Dostoevsky, it is a much smaller novel in themes and scope than his later works. Its tone was nightmarish and disorienting which really placed you into the mind of the main character, it was such a realistic portrayal of anxiety.

Just started reading Peter Brown's biography of St. Augustine. I've finished the first few chapters and I'm enjoying it, he's giving a very readable and vivid portrayal of Roman North Africa, incredibly fascinating! I'm looking forward to delving into it.
"If your heart comes to feel a natural hatred for sin, it has defeated the causes of sin and freed itself from them. Keep hell’s torments in mind; but know that your Helper is at hand. Do nothing that will grieve Him, but say to Him with tears: ‘Be merciful and deliver me, O Lord, for without Thy help I cannot escape from the hands of my enemies.’ Be attentive to your heart, and He will guard you from all evil."

- St. Isaias the Solitary

"Constant action overcomes cold; being still overcomes heat. Purity
and stillness give the correct law to all under heaven."

- Tao Te Ching 45
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I just finished Michael Hoffmans Occult Renaissance Church which I found completely riveting and shocking in a way, but if true it would go a long way in explaining many of the current crises in the RCC. Very well cited and chock full of footnotes. 

Currently re-reading Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov and getting a lot more out of it some 15-20 years later.  He's a master of human psychology. Another thing that I always get from Dostoevsky is how vivid the dissolution of the culture was after Peter I, how much disdain for all things Russian so many of the elite and the intelligentsia had.  His penetrating look at human psychology and the decrepit, liberal Western looking culture of much of 19th century urban Russia was just ripe for the Revolution that would follow a few decades later. 

 I guess I still prefer Gogol but Dostoevsky comes a close second as far as 19th century Russian novelists go.  

Just started Russia,Ritual, and Reform by Peter Meyendorf. It's about the characters surrounding the liturgical reforms of the 17th century under Nikon and part two of the book is a side by side look at exactly what was changed between new and old.  

I just finished for the second time Robert Button's doctoral thesis about the theology of ritual as it relates to the Old Believers (if anyone is interested I'll link or PM it)  and reading it confirms (once again)  what I've always believed- -Lex Orandi,Lex Credendi matters- - and that changing the form actually changes the content. In a certain sense inner and outer are interrelated.  It's not just a matter of form taking on the content of some subjective faith.   

 This is something Geoffrey Hull sort of alludes to also in his seminal work The Banished Heart which is more focused on Catholicism and the Western tradition than the Byzantine or Muscovite. Understanding this is ultimately why even when a Catholic I realised the Pauline Mass was indeed a danger to one's faith, and why everything from church architecture to music being changed actually do express something completely different than what came before, and explains why so many in the pews do not believe what people believed even 60-70 years ago.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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(10-19-2019, 06:56 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I just finished Michael Hoffmans Occult Renaissance Church which I found completely riveting and shocking in a way, but if true it would go a long way in explaining many of the current crises in the RCC. Very well cited and chock full of footnotes.  
Dang, that sounds real interesting. I might have to pick up a copy.
"The Heart of Jesus is closer to you when you suffer, than when you are full of joy." - St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

'Vanity of vanities, said Ecclesiastes: vanity of vanities, and all is vanity.' - Ecclesiastes 1:2

My blog: https://slavetothesacredhe.art.blog/
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(10-19-2019, 05:15 PM)Augustinian Wrote:
(10-19-2019, 06:56 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I just finished Michael Hoffmans Occult Renaissance Church which I found completely riveting and shocking in a way, but if true it would go a long way in explaining many of the current crises in the RCC. Very well cited and chock full of footnotes.  
Dang, that sounds real interesting. I might have to pick up a copy.

It was shockingly good and very well researched.  Took me about a month to slowly read through because it was so dense.  Very very illuminating. Planning on getting his usury book next.
Walk before God in simplicity, and not in subtleties of the mind. Simplicity brings faith; but subtle and intricate speculations bring conceit; and conceit brings withdrawal from God. -Saint Isaac of Syria, Directions on Spiritual Training


"It is impossible in human terms to exaggerate the importance of being in a church or chapel before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. I very seldom repeat what I say. Let me repeat this sentence. It is impossible in human language to exaggerate the importance of being in a chapel or church before the Blessed Sacrament as often and for as long as our duties and state of life allow. That sentence is the talisman of the highest sanctity. "Father John Hardon
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(10-19-2019, 06:56 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Currently re-reading Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov and getting a lot more out of it some 15-20 years later.  He's a master of human psychology. Another thing that I always get from Dostoevsky is how vivid the dissolution of the culture was after Peter I, how much disdain for all things Russian so many of the elite and the intelligentsia had.  His penetrating look at human psychology and the decrepit, liberal Western looking culture of much of 19th century urban Russia was just ripe for the Revolution that would follow a few decades later. 

Nice! That's probably my #1 book. I've read it three times and I've always got more and more out of it. I was at a very different point in my life each time I read it so I looked at the characters differently each time, identifying more with others and understanding others better than before. The Brothers Karamazov is one that really sticks with you and I hope to read it again in a few years.
"If your heart comes to feel a natural hatred for sin, it has defeated the causes of sin and freed itself from them. Keep hell’s torments in mind; but know that your Helper is at hand. Do nothing that will grieve Him, but say to Him with tears: ‘Be merciful and deliver me, O Lord, for without Thy help I cannot escape from the hands of my enemies.’ Be attentive to your heart, and He will guard you from all evil."

- St. Isaias the Solitary

"Constant action overcomes cold; being still overcomes heat. Purity
and stillness give the correct law to all under heaven."

- Tao Te Ching 45
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