Our Lady of Victory
#1
I was puzzled why Our Lady of Victory's title was changed to Our Lady of the Rosary. From my jaundiced, 20th century eyes, it appears as of PCness has been around a lot longer than I thought.
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#2
The title remains, but the name of the feast was changed in 1969 by Pope Paul VI.

The original name was instituted in 1571 by Pope Pius V to commemorate the Battle of Lepanto.

Perhaps, from a non critical perspective, the change was to reflect the more general nature of the Rosary because the individual battle was fought long ago and although worthy of remembrance, there are also many other things to remember besides the single battle. It would seem an arbitrary choice of battle, if taken in a holistic sense (there were many crucial battles to protect the Church and Her people).

Of course, the timing and person of the change is suspicious, but I won't speculate on that.
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#3
I agree that the significance of Lepanto can be lost after a while so making the title more broad seens reasonable. But then again this was done by Pope Paul VI who actually gave the banners taken at Lepanto back to the Turks. Unfortunately I can only conclude he did this for what we now call "PC reasons."
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#4
(06-14-2009, 01:49 PM)didishroom Wrote: I agree that the significance of Lepanto can be lost after a while so making the title more broad seens reasonable. But then again this was done by Pope Paul VI who actually gave the banners taken at Lepanto back to the Turks. Unfortunately I can only conclude he did this for what we now call "PC reasons."

I guess I shouldn't have asked a question that I didn't want to learn the answer to. I was hoping for something a bit more wholesome, but it is as I suspected.

Can this be seen as the start of the change from "The Church Militant" to "The Church Supplicant" where we started apologizing for the sins of the world?
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#5
(06-14-2009, 02:10 PM)DarkKnight Wrote: I guess I shouldn't have asked a question that I didn't want to learn the answer to. I was hoping for something a bit more wholesome, but it is as I suspected.

It is an inoffensive change though, as the title still is used and it is only a name of the feast (and using the old title in not inappopriate)
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#6
didishroom Wrote:But then again this was done by Pope Paul VI who actually gave the banners taken at Lepanto back to the Turks.

Please explain more about this event.
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#7
(06-14-2009, 01:43 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The title remains, but the name of the feast was changed in 1969 by Pope Paul VI.

The original name was instituted in 1571 by Pope Pius V to commemorate the Battle of Lepanto.

Perhaps, from a non critical perspective, the change was to reflect the more general nature of the Rosary because the individual battle was fought long ago and although worthy of remembrance, there are also many other things to remember besides the single battle. It would seem an arbitrary choice of battle, if taken in a holistic sense (there were many crucial battles to protect the Church and Her people).

Of course, the timing and person of the change is suspicious, but I won't speculate on that.
Um....actually Paul VI didn't change anything. The name change was by Gregory  XIII in Monet Apostolus
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Animadvertentes quoque eadem die septima, quae tunc fuit Dies Dominica prima dicti mensis Octobris, Fraternitates omnes sub dicti Rosarii nuncupatione militantes per universum Orbem iuxta earum laudabilia instituta et consuetudines, processionaliter incedentes, pias ad DEUM preces effudisse, quas per intercessionem Beatissimae Virginis ad dictam Victoriam consequendam multum profuisse pie credendum est, operae pretium nos facturos esse existim avimus, si ad tantae victor-ae caelitus proculdubio concessae memoriam conservandam, et ad gratias Deo, et Beatissimae Virgini agendas, festum solemne sub nuncupatione Rosarii, prima Dominica mensis Octobris singulis annis celebrandum iustitueremus. Quocirca Motu proprio, et de Apostolicae potestatis plenitudine, ad laudem DEI et Domini nostri IESU Christi, et usque. gloriosae Virginis Matris, tenore praesentium decernimus, ut de cetero perpetuis futuris temporibus, qualibet prima die Dominica mensis Octob. per universi Orbis partes, in iis videlicet Ecclesiis, in quibus altare, vel Capella Rosarii fuerit; ab omnibus et singulis utriusque sexus Christifidelibus, festum solemne sub nuncupatione Rosarii praedicti, sub duplici maiori officio ad instar aliarum solemnium festivitatum celebretur, et santificetur, eademque die officium de Beatissima Virgine novem lectionum more Ecclesiastico persolvatur, & recitetur.
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#8
(06-14-2009, 09:48 PM)PeteC Wrote: Um....actually Paul VI didn't change anything. The name change was by Gregory  XIII in Monet Apostolus
Ah, in 1573 Pope Gregory XIII changed the title to "Feast of the Holy Rosary" from "Our Lady of Victory", but Pope Paul VI changed it to "Our Lady of the Rosary". My researched skipped the middle before. (And Pope Paul VI did change it ;))
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#9
(06-14-2009, 09:53 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(06-14-2009, 09:48 PM)PeteC Wrote: Um....actually Paul VI didn't change anything. The name change was by Gregory  XIII in Monet Apostolus
Ah, in 1573 Pope Gregory XIII changed the title to "Feast of the Holy Rosary" from "Our Lady of Victory", but Pope Paul VI changed it to "Our Lady of the Rosary". My researched skipped the middle before. (And Pope Paul VI did change it ;))

Actually, that was John XXIII who changed it from "Feast of the Most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary" to "Blessed Virgin Mary of the Rosary", which was the title under which it was known at Rome.

Going back to the reasons for the change by Gregory XIII, I have read it suggested that (a) Pius V only established a particular (as in, local) feast to commemorate a single event hence the title whereas Gregory's was much broader (b) Pius V did not want to be seen as favoring a devotion of his Order - remember that at this time, the Rosary was no where near as common or widespread as it is today, and was one of a number of competing chaplets and devotions (each Order trying to promote "their" practice) , though very popular.
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#10
(06-14-2009, 09:57 PM)PeteC Wrote: Actually, that was John XXIII who changed it from "Feast of the Most Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary" to "Blessed Virgin Mary of the Rosary", which was the title under which it was known at Rome.

Pope John XXIII died in 1963. The name of the feast was changed to its current ordinary Latin status in 1969. I highly doubt Pope John Paul XXIII changed it from the grave ;)
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