Pauline Chapel reopened and renovated--Back to tradition!!!
#11
(07-07-2009, 10:46 AM)SaintRafael Wrote: Unfortunately there is a scandal in this rennovation.  Pope Benedict has removed the marble altar away from the wall and placed it near the middle like a Protestant table. For centuries the altar was always against the wall, and turing it into a N.O. table is a break with tradition and Catholicism.

Have you not seen the scandal that is the St Peter's Basilica? Its altar is free-standing, and the altar's baldacchino was designed by a certain Bernini, which sounds suspiciously like Bugnini … Coincidence? As if! :sneaky:
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#12
(07-07-2009, 01:17 PM)Dauphin Wrote: The altar was moved forward to permit it to be completely encircled while being incensed, which is ideal. To say that every freestanding altar is a `protestant table` is simply blasphemous. Freestanding altars have an ancient history in the church, and are perfectly in line with Catholic Tradition.

It`s this sort of ignorant numskullery which gives traditionalists a bad name.

This isn't the early centuries is it? There has been development in doctrine and liturgy since then. The Fixed Altar has been the Catholic tradition for the most recent centuries. Your opinion of Freestanding Altars is the error of Antiquarianism.

There are certain conditions that might allow Freestanding Altars, most of these are mostly due to temporary circumstances.

There is no excuse for a church or chapel that will be around in history for centuries like this Papal chapel will, to have a Freestanding Altar instead of a Fixed one.

Freestanding Altars is now a Protestant tradition that has been around in the last couple of centuries because of their rejection of sacrifice in the liturgy.

The only numskullery is those with power in the Church who contine to ignore Catholic tradition/theology in the liturgy, and contine  to use the symbols of Protestantism to keep alive the liturgical revolution of the Modernists and heretics.
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#13
SaintRafael Wrote:There are certain conditions that might allow Freestanding Altars, most of these are mostly due to temporary circumstances.

Don't be a dummy, Rafael. As the Catholic Encyclopedia states:

Catholic Encyclopedia on "Altar" Wrote:From the words of the Pontifical we infer that the high altar must stand free on all sides (Pontifex circuit septies tabulam altaris), but the back part of smaller altars may be built against the wall.

The freestanding remains the liturgical ideal today, as it always has been even when fixed altars were more popular. When consecrating a new altar, the Pontifical assumes that the bishop is able to walk around the entire structure.

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#14
(07-07-2009, 04:51 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Don't be a dummy, Rafael. As the Catholic Encyclopedia states:
Catholic Encyclopedia on "Altar" Wrote:From the words of the Pontifical we infer that the high altar must stand free on all sides (Pontifex circuit septies tabulam altaris), but the back part of smaller altars may be built against the wall.

The freestanding remains the liturgical ideal today, as it always has been even when fixed altars were more popular. When consecrating a new altar, the Pontifical assumes that the bishop is able to walk around the entire structure.

When the Chapel was built by Pope Paul III, it was a Fixed Altar against the wall. This chapel remained like so for 400 years until the liturgical disasters that came after Vatican II, when Pope Paul VI ruined it along with many other things he destroyed. 
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#15
(07-07-2009, 05:03 PM)SaintRafael Wrote:
(07-07-2009, 04:51 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Don't be a dummy, Rafael. As the Catholic Encyclopedia states:
Catholic Encyclopedia on "Altar" Wrote:From the words of the Pontifical we infer that the high altar must stand free on all sides (Pontifex circuit septies tabulam altaris), but the back part of smaller altars may be built against the wall.

The freestanding remains the liturgical ideal today, as it always has been even when fixed altars were more popular. When consecrating a new altar, the Pontifical assumes that the bishop is able to walk around the entire structure.

When the Chapel was built by Pope Paul III, it was a Fixed Altar against the wall. This chapel remained like so for 400 years until the liturgical disasters that came after Vatican II, when Pope Paul VI ruined it along with many other things he destroyed. 

Clever way to shift your argument.
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#16
(07-07-2009, 05:06 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Clever way to shift your argument.

People can write all day long defending Free Standing Altars, but in the end what was the position of the Altar in that one chapel for its entire history?
The truth in this matter is found in the geographical location of the Alar. History shows that for 350+ years the Altar was against the Wall. History also shows that for 40+ years the Altar was not against the wall.

It is easy to see the right answer from the data of history.
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#17
(07-07-2009, 05:13 PM)SaintRafael Wrote:
(07-07-2009, 05:06 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Clever way to shift your argument.

People can write all day long defending Free Standing Altars, but in the end what was the position of the Altar in that one chapel for its entire history?
The truth in this matter is found in the geographical location of the Alar. History shows that for 350+ years the Altar was against the Wall. History also shows that for 40+ years the Altar was not against the wall.

It is easy to see the right answer from the data of history.

Another clever shift.  You're good.
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