In praise of grinding your own coffee
#1
When you buy freshly roasted whole beans and then you grind a small amount to brew, the flavor is just so wonderful! Naturally, the quality of the coffee would depend on the kind of beans that you get but given the same kind, freshly ground beans are the best.

Another thing about grinding your own beans and preserving the flavor of the coffee is that you can store the whole beans for a longer period of time than you could store coffee grounds. I have noticed that even if you store coffee grounds in a sealed container, the freshness deteriorates much more quickly than if you stored the whole beans and grind it yourself at home..

Coffee beans are taken from a living plant, and as such, have a limited shelf life. Like most organic products, you can increase their life by storing them properly. More importantly – at least to most coffee drinkers – proper coffee storage preserves the flavor of the coffee. You see, coffee beans contain certain oils that give coffee its characteristic flavor. Those oils are released by the roasting process, and decay rather quickly once the coffee has been roasted. Grinding the coffee beans speeds up the flavor loss even more. So buy beans whole and grind them as you need them and keep the bag in the refrigerator.

To get the best flavor from your coffee, you should brew it within two weeks of roasting (so buy small quantities: We usually buy it about a half pound at a time), and immediately after grinding. In fact, coffee is at its peak flavor about 48 hours after roasting. That’s a time line that’s pretty close to impossible unless you’re buying raw beans and roasting your own. If you buy your coffee as whole roasted coffee beans, you can make a point of looking for the date that the coffee was roasted.

As to buying grinders (coffee mills) here is a tip: look in antique stores. Tom (matthew_talbot) and I love to go antiquing and found some great mills we own; all for under $25. Also, buy the old fashioned hand-crank ones, not the electric. Most of the electric ones don't grind; they chop, so the oils are not released properly. Children love to hand-crank the grinder too!! our girls, who are 8 and 5, love to make coffee for us.  :)

Reply
#2
(07-28-2009, 09:58 AM)Joan of Arc Wrote: When you buy freshly roasted whole beans and then you grind a small amount to brew, the flavor is just so wonderful! Naturally, the quality of the coffee would depend on the kind of beans that you get but given the same kind, freshly ground beans are the best.

Another thing about grinding your own beans and preserving the flavor of the coffee is that you can store the whole beans for a longer period of time than you could store coffee grounds. I have noticed that even if you store coffee grounds in a sealed container, the freshness deteriorates much more quickly than if you stored the whole beans and grind it yourself at home..

Coffee beans are taken from a living plant, and as such, have a limited shelf life. Like most organic products, you can increase their life by storing them properly. More importantly – at least to most coffee drinkers – proper coffee storage preserves the flavor of the coffee. You see, coffee beans contain certain oils that give coffee its characteristic flavor. Those oils are released by the roasting process, and decay rather quickly once the coffee has been roasted. Grinding the coffee beans speeds up the flavor loss even more. So buy beans whole and grind them as you need them and keep the bag in the refrigerator.

To get the best flavor from your coffee, you should brew it within two weeks of roasting (so buy small quantities: We usually buy it about a half pound at a time), and immediately after grinding. In fact, coffee is at its peak flavor about 48 hours after roasting. That’s a time line that’s pretty close to impossible unless you’re buying raw beans and roasting your own. If you buy your coffee as whole roasted coffee beans, you can make a point of looking for the date that the coffee was roasted.

As to buying grinders (coffee mills) here is a tip: look in antique stores. Tom (matthew_talbot) and I love to go antiquing and found some great mills we own; all for under $25. Also, buy the old fashioned hand-crank ones, not the electric. Most of the electric ones don't grind; they chop, so the oils are not released properly. Children love to hand-crank the grinder too!! our girls, who are 8 and 5, love to make coffee for us.  :)

I began my search for the perfect cup of coffee about 15 years ago.  Since then, I have been grinding my own beans.  I use an insulated french press and use precise measurements and temperatures.  It is the one thing I am obsessive compulsive about.  My only concession to economy is that I buy my beans in bulk via mail, so I need to keep them in airtight containers pending use, but it comes out pretty well.  I do use the electric grinder, so maybe I will look for a handcrank antique model.  I admit it -- I am a coffee snob.   
Reply
#3
"I am a coffee snob"

If you roasted your own beans, then yes you would be a coffee snob. Until then? ;D
Reply
#4
(07-29-2009, 04:31 AM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: "I am a coffee snob"

If you roasted your own beans, then yes you would be a coffee snob. Until then? ;D


Ha.  No, I don't roast my own; that's probably a little too much hands on, even for me.  But I won't drink poorly brewed coffee (unless I'm really desperate).  Perhaps I'm just ultra fussy.   
Reply
#5
Ah, just go straight to the source and grind your coffee beans with your molars. It boosts dietary fiber and none of the precious caffeine goes to waste.
Reply
#6
If it's fresh, if you just popped open a can straight way home from the store, then its going to be really good. That's the whole key to it. No mystery there.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)