"anullment" of sainthood
#21
You show me evidence of a gay saint, and I'll show you evidence of historical revisionism.

If some saints (most obviously Christopher) were decanonized, it is to say that they were removed from the canon or martyrology, not that they were kicked out of heaven.
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#22
It's hard to see how a canonization can be absolutely infallible.  It certainly wouldn't be covered by Vatican I's definition of the Pope's infallible magisterium, because that definition contains the following language:

"For the holy Spirit was promised to the successors of Peter not so that they might, by his revelation, make known some new doctrine, but that, by his assistance, they might religiously guard and faithfully expound the revelation or deposit of faith transmitted by the apostles. "

Now, the sanctity of a particular individual who lived after the close of the apostolic age is obviously not part of the deposit of faith transmitted by the apostles.  The Pope canonizes saints based on the best information he can obtain about their lives.  I don't see how the determination can be infallible unless God makes a special revelation to the Pope on the subject [EDIT:  and we believe that revelation ended with the last Apostle].  If the investigation is thorough and enough information is available, the sanctity of a person can be morally certain (in the sense of "beyond a reasonable doubt"), particularly if it is confirmed by miracles.
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#23
Didn't something wacky happen with Clement of Alexandria? I think he was regarded as a saint for a few hundred years but that devotion to him was suppressed.
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#24
Who were the other saints supposedly "decanonized"?  I'd like to check in the Martyrology; St. Christopher is still listed in the Martyrology (at least the French edition - I don't have a Latin version handy) - his commemoration on July 25 was simply suppressed since the Ordinary Form does not permit commemorations like the traditional rite does.

Here is St. Christopher's entry in the modern Martyrology:
Quote:Ce même jour, saint Christophe, probablement martyrisé au milieu du IIIe siècle. Son nom, qui signifie "Porte-Christ", l'a fait désigner comme protecteur de tous ceux qui utilisent des moyens de transport.

My quick translation: "On the same day (July 25), St. Christopher, probably martyred in the middle of the third century.  His name, which means "Christ-carrier," designates him as the protector of all those who use means of transportation."
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#25
(07-29-2009, 04:12 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: You show me evidence of a gay saint, and I'll show you evidence of historical revisionism.

If some saints (most obviously Christopher) were decanonized, it is to say that they were removed from the canon or martyrology, not that they were kicked out of heaven.

He's still in heaven, we just don't get to go out to dinner for his feast day. He still commands a health amount of shelf space at the "Holy Store."
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#26
(07-28-2009, 12:06 PM)veritatem_dilexisti Wrote:
(07-28-2009, 12:02 PM)Melita Wrote: How does this apply to saints who are deemed to have been "fabulous"?

"It is also commonly and rightly held that the Church is infallible in the canonization of saints, that is to say, when canonization takes place according to the solemn process that has been followed since the ninth century." (CE, "Infallibility")

Right, and JP2 changed the process so...
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#27
(07-30-2009, 04:34 PM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(07-28-2009, 12:06 PM)veritatem_dilexisti Wrote:
(07-28-2009, 12:02 PM)Melita Wrote: How does this apply to saints who are deemed to have been "fabulous"?

"It is also commonly and rightly held that the Church is infallible in the canonization of saints, that is to say, when canonization takes place according to the solemn process that has been followed since the ninth century." (CE, "Infallibility")

Right, and JP2 changed the process so...

And he canonized, what, like 400 people...
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#28
(07-30-2009, 06:16 PM)CatholicThurifer Wrote: And he canonized, what, like 400 people...

It's good for the Holy Father to have friends in high places; no? A whole cafeteria full of saints praying for him!
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#29
(07-30-2009, 06:16 PM)CatholicThurifer Wrote: And he canonized, what, like 400 people...

Majority of them groups of martyrs.
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#30
(07-30-2009, 07:40 PM)Tobri Wrote:
(07-30-2009, 06:16 PM)CatholicThurifer Wrote: And he canonized, what, like 400 people...

Majority of them groups of martyrs.

Martyrs were still subject to investigation and the process.  Not all martyrs are canonized, and as far as a group of people go, it could be that in a group of 100, 2 die in witness of the faith and 98 are killed for political reasons so each person should be looked at individually as much as possible.

I'm not saying what the case was with these groups because I don't know, but the fact they are a group even labelledas  martyrs doesn't make it any more reliable if the investigations are lacking.

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