Subforum reopened
#1
I decided I just don't care anymore.  Have at it.
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#2
:laughing:
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#3
(08-05-2009, 09:41 AM)QuisUtDeus Wrote: I decided I just don't care anymore.  Have at it.

But your reasons were good! I'm very glad it's reopened, but I do hope you'll enforce some rules here. I may not know much, but I suspect that theology is too important just to "have at it."

I'm going to start basing all my arguments here on the Bhagavad Gita. Even though I've never read it.  ;)

You've got a big job around here, Quis. Thanks for your hard work keeping this forum alive and effective.
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#4
(08-06-2009, 12:36 PM)Antonius Block Wrote: I'm going to start basing all my arguments here on the Bhagavad Gita. Even though I've never read it.  ;)

It is a good text and full of interesting ideas.

"Death is as sure for that which is born, as birth is for that which is dead. Therefore grieve not for what is inevitable."

"Always perform your duty efficiently and without attachment to the results, because by doing work without attachment one attains the Supreme."

"Do your duty, to the best of your abilities, for the Lord without any selfish motive, and remember God at all times - before starting a work, at the completion of a task, and while inactive."
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#5
(08-06-2009, 12:39 PM)Rosarium Wrote: "Death is as sure for that which is born, as birth is for that which is dead. [...]"

Is this line meant to support a belief in reincarnation?
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#6
(08-06-2009, 02:01 PM)in vitam aeternam Wrote:
(08-06-2009, 12:39 PM)Rosarium Wrote: "Death is as sure for that which is born, as birth is for that which is dead. [...]"

Is this line meant to support a belief in reincarnation?

A belief of mine or a belief of the Bhagavad Gita? It isn't my belief, and the line may support that belief. When it was written (or spoken), they had no revelations so a belief such as that wouldn't be that strange.
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#7
(08-06-2009, 02:05 PM)Rosarium Wrote: A belief of mine or a belief of the Bhagavad Gita?

The latter.
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#8
Bring on the dancing angels' pinhead squaredance! Yee haw!
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#9
(08-06-2009, 12:39 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(08-06-2009, 12:36 PM)Antonius Block Wrote: I'm going to start basing all my arguments here on the Bhagavad Gita. Even though I've never read it.  ;)

It is a good text and full of interesting ideas.

"Death is as sure for that which is born, as birth is for that which is dead. Therefore grieve not for what is inevitable."

"Always perform your duty efficiently and without attachment to the results, because by doing work without attachment one attains the Supreme."

"Do your duty, to the best of your abilities, for the Lord without any selfish motive, and remember God at all times - before starting a work, at the completion of a task, and while inactive."

OK, fine, maybe I should have said Calvin's Institutes. Would that be more controversial?  :)

Actually, the quotes you've posted are quite thought-provoking. I've been interested in the Bhagavad Gita for a while, in addition to other works of Eastern religion and philosophy. I've got my hands pretty full learning about this whole Catholicism thing right now, but maybe someday, when I've got a firmer theological foundation, I'll feel more comfortable branching out. I've always really enjoyed the Tao Te Ching, even though it's really tough to get a grasp on conceptually. (Although a Taoist might say that a conceptual grasp isn't the point...)
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#10
(08-06-2009, 11:10 PM)Antonius Block Wrote: OK, fine, maybe I should have said Calvin's Institutes. Would that be more controversial?  :)
Calvin and Hobbes?

Quote:Actually, the quotes you've posted are quite thought-provoking. I've been interested in the Bhagavad Gita for a while, in addition to other works of Eastern religion and philosophy. I've got my hands pretty full learning about this whole Catholicism thing right now, but maybe someday, when I've got a firmer theological foundation, I'll feel more comfortable branching out. I've always really enjoyed the Tao Te Ching, even though it's really tough to get a grasp on conceptually. (Although a Taoist might say that a conceptual grasp isn't the point...)
The Bhagavad Gita is full of stuff like that. The context of it is Arjuna doubting his ability to take part in a war (the Kurukshetra war) and being advised by Krishna. The other side had a lot of people who Arjuna wouldn't want to fight (relatives, friends, and advisers), and Krishna councils him on various topics, like duty and death.

Because this work is highly influential in modern false religions, it should be read with care. Most translations will lean towards a modern way of reading it (the work for example has Krishna denying divinity and claiming that there is one God, but this doesn't stop people from claiming Krishna is the divine). I only like it as an ancient work of philosophy which can't be expected to be all True, but it has a lot of good passages and situations in it.
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