The Present Position of Cardinal Newman
#1
THE PRESENT POSITION OF CARDINAL NEWMAN

from December 1954 issue of The Point, edited under Fr. Leonard Feeney, M.I.C.M.


I decided to delete this post. It was highly critical of Newman and may have trespassed on certain rules. Skip to second page, where I provide links to a Catholic writer who provides an analysis of Feeney's problems with Newman.
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#2
Cardinal Newman is the man.
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#3
First, what evidence is there, apart from the remarkable ugly comments on his ancestry, that Cardinal Newman was jewish? Or that his conversion was not genuine? If so, he certainly suffered much unnecessary ridicule and public humiliation for a "nostalgic conversion"! But I note not one scrap of evidence in this article against Newman, against this alleged infiltration of Newman societies by Jews- leading any observer into the conclusion that they HAVE no evidence at all.  Any person truly interested in Newman can read Michael Davies' "Lead, Kindly Light".
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#4
Sorry, but the intellectual dishonesty in this piece is staggering: he has to be jewish because he was good at Music and Mathematics? Excuse me? And he loved pagan authors? Well, put him  right alongside Sts. Augustine, Albert and Aquinas, then!
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#5
I don't know anything about Newman's ancestry.

Here's some more from The Point about Newman Clubs:

The Newman Clubs

Amid the ordered barbarism which the late Dr. Roosevelt was wont to call “our American way of life,” there is established a pattern which may be identified by the name of “our club culture.” For the levels of American sociability lend themselves admirably to a breakdown by “clubs” — beginning at the top with the polo club, the yacht club, the country club, descending through the women’s club, the bridge club, the Lions Club, and terminating inelegantly at “Mike’s Club — Beer Ten Cents a Glass.”

Distributed up and down this vertical hierarchy (generously in the middle, sparsely at either end) are the subsidiary clubs — aggregations of button collectors, bird watchers, and the offspring of American Revolutionaries. With pompous Mesdames President and dutiful sub-chairmen, the members of the clubs sustain themselves in that one interest which provides their common unity — to wit, bizarre buttons, odd birds, or rabble-rousing ancestors.

In the midst of these lesser gatherings, and willing to be taken for one of them, is the Newman Club Federation, that appraisal of the Catholic Faith as “something to have a doubt about.”

Newman Clubs are now about fifty years old. Their members are those tragically misplaced persons, Catholic students at non-Catholic colleges. And their very name, Newman, gives them away.

It was the spirit of Newman’s writings, quite as much as his over-esteemed clarity, which made him so fit the purposes of American Catholics at non-Catholic colleges. For in everything that Newman said in print, after he rationalized his way into the Church, there is a clear determination to dissociate himself from all that he considered vulgar (that is, not English) in his new-found religion. He felt, for example, that devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary was being carried too far, and that the infallibility of the Pope was something to keep quiet about!

As they started off, the Newman Clubs selected John Henry Cardinal Newman as their patron for many reasons, one of which was their certainty that he would never embarrass them by getting canonized and turning into a patron-saint. Newman, they decided, was an eminently acceptable variety of Catholic to bring to the attention of our secular universities. To begin with, he was not a noisy Irish-American Catholic, but an ex-Anglican English one. And he was not only literate, he was even literary.

The establishers of the Newman Clubs must have realized, however, that in importing his spirit, much of Newman’s Oxford refinement and Anglican propriety would be lost in transit. For when it is found on a Midwestern university campus, clad in blue-jeans at a Newman Club weenie roast, the spirit of John Henry Cardinal Newman as stripped of all but its most basic elements: compromise of and apology for the Faith.

The Newman Club maintains that a Catholic student can “stick it out” at a secular college and preserve his Faith by means of weekly teas, monthly dances and an occasional festive breakfast, preceded by a hasty Holy Communion. In fact, Newman Club bulletins point proudly to recent surveys which report that although the percentage of Catholic students who leave the Faith at secular colleges is very high, the number is considerably lower among those students who are Newman Clubbers.

The Newman policy is blithely and blindly to assume that the student who does not openly break with the Faith must therefore still have it. And this policy explains the Newman Club alumni, those secularly-educated thousands who are, in name, Catholic, but who are, in sympathy, outlook, judgment, appreciation, manner, in their very impulse, non-Catholic, and what is worse, unconcerned that this is the case.

The declared purpose of the Newman Club movement is, “the religious, intellectual, and social betterment of its members.” Understood, is the qualification, “provided such betterment in no way interferes with that primary consideration, the Catholic student’s acquisition of a secular college degree.” Thus, the effectiveness of a Newman Club as a secular college is the effectiveness of the boy who held his finger in the leaking dike, hoping to keep back the flood which was pouring in over the top.

Our necessary conclusion? We prefer degree-less Catholics to drowned ones.
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#6
(08-17-2009, 10:33 PM)stvincentferrer Wrote: I don't know anything about Newman's ancestry.

And so you post a caluminous article accusing him of being Jewish, with no evidence. And, BTW, the 'Present Position of Cardinal Newman is that he's Venerable John Henry Newman, well on his way to Beatification.
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#7
Looks like the magazine has an axe to grind against the Venerable John C.N.
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#8
Again, I can't help but notice that the only argument brought forth here is the author's characterizations of Newman and the people in Newman societies. "As they started off, the Newman Clubs selected John Henry Cardinal Newman as their patron for many reasons, one of which was their certainty that he would never embarrass them by getting canonized and turning into a patron-saint. Newman, they decided, was an eminently acceptable variety of Catholic to bring to the attention of our secular universities. To begin with, he was not a noisy Irish-American Catholic, but an ex-Anglican English one. And he was not only literate, he was even literary." No source given. You are left to imagine that this, and only this, is the opinion of Newman societies even though there is no source, no statements from it's founders, no quote from Newman himself, even, nothing! Other than the author's obvious personal dislike for Newman, there is no substantive argumentin these articles. That said, this is calumny towards the dead. To justify this would require more than the fact that a certain Fr Leonard Feeney didn't like him.
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#9
Wonder if it's an English vs. Irish thing. Ex: "To begin with, he was not a noisy Irish-American Catholic, but an ex-Anglican English one."
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#10
(08-17-2009, 10:38 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-17-2009, 10:33 PM)stvincentferrer Wrote: I don't know anything about Newman's ancestry.

And so you post a caluminous article accusing him of being Jewish, with no evidence. And, BTW, the 'Present Position of Cardinal Newman is that he's Venerable John Henry Newman, well on his way to Beatification.

Take a breather. It's not my fault for posting something that you don't like. I don't agree with everything in the articles I post. If you have a problem with the post take it up with Quis and get it deleted if it's breaking some rule. In hindsight I should have posted it in the Catholic history section. I didn't post it because I'm motivated by any animus towards Newman. I don't know much about him.
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