Distributism:A Catholic System of Economics
#11
+AMDG

(08-20-2009, 08:53 AM)Rosarium Wrote: I did want to read it, but why would I want to download a large PDF file, which uses a proprietary format?

Do you see any problem with using PDF documents in light of your strong economic ideas? Tsk.

I know this thread is pretty well dead now, and I'm not trying to revive it; however, pdf is *not* a proprietary format.  It's an open format which was originally developed by Adobe but available for everyone in its full specification, without any licensing requirements.  Now, Acrobat reader is proprietary software, but there are many non-proprietary readers capable of displaying pdfs, most of which are better than Acrobat.  See Why Adobe is Still (Partly) Evil for some explanation of how.

I'd recommend Ghostview if you use Windows, xpdf or kpdf if you use Linux.
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#12
(08-27-2009, 12:47 PM)dgoodmaniii Wrote: +AMDG
I know this thread is pretty well dead now, and I'm not trying to revive it; however, pdf is *not* a proprietary format.  It's an open format which was originally developed by Adobe but available for everyone in its full specification, without any licensing requirements.  Now, Acrobat reader is proprietary software, but there are many non-proprietary readers capable of displaying pdfs, most of which are better than Acrobat.  See Why Adobe is Still (Partly) Evil for some explanation of how.

I'd recommend Ghostview if you use Windows, xpdf or kpdf if you use Linux.

I am a year behind (July 1, 2008). Thank you for the correction :) ISO/IEC 32000-1:2008 it is.

Xpdf follows DRM, which is wholly evil. It is also not GPL.

I recommend Evince, Okular or gv. All GPL.
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#13
+AMDG

(08-27-2009, 12:53 PM)Rosarium Wrote: Xpdf follows DRM, which is wholly evil. It is also not GPL.

I recommend Evince, Okular or gv. All GPL.

Sad about the DRM, but true.  Still, it *is* FOSS, and it *is* GPL.  Xpdf:  About.  Also, while it implements pdf copy protections, it does so because it's in the standard; it wouldn't be standards-compliant if it didn't.

I like xpdf because it's incredibly light and doesn't require the heavy GTK+ libraries that evince does or the KDE4 libraries that Okular does.  (I run fvwm.)  gv is great, though; I've got to give you that.
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#14
(08-27-2009, 02:57 PM)dgoodmaniii Wrote: Sad about the DRM, but true.  Still, it *is* FOSS, and it *is* GPL.  Xpdf:  About.  Also, while it implements pdf copy protections, it does so because it's in the standard; it wouldn't be standards-compliant if it didn't.
Can't fault it for following a standard, but foolishly sticking to the standard is foolish. Look at GNU. They go beyond the standard's all the time, although they have standard's compliant modes so they can claim to be standards compliant.

Quote:I like xpdf because it's incredibly light and doesn't require the heavy GTK+ libraries that evince does or the KDE4 libraries that Okular does.  (I run fvwm.)  gv is great, though; I've got to give you that.
I use xmonad, a tiling window manager. I do use a mix of applications though. The libraries aren't heavy, they are just big. They don't slow the system. Disk space is cheap :)

I've used twm, the standard WM for X. I've only used fvwm incidently (if it happened to be a default).

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#15
Just to clarify, is Distributism the preferred economic system of the trad movement as a whole? I feel like I see a lot of threads on this, but I haven't read any of them closely.
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#16
(08-27-2009, 04:07 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: Just to clarify, is Distributism the preferred economic system of the trad movement as a whole?
No. It is just seen as an ideal by some. It, however, does not have any real real life usage so far, so it remains an ideal.

Quote: I feel like I see a lot of threads on this, but I haven't read any of them closely.
Yeah, one person made many, many threads on it. Aside from a few people (two or three), it hardly gets any exposure at all.

The OP of this thread is banned, so don't expect replies. He also made many threads on this, mostly copy and pastes of articles.
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#17
Roger. Thanks!
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#18
(08-27-2009, 04:34 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: Roger. Thanks!

You're welcome, and don't call me Roger :)
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#19
+AMDG

(08-27-2009, 04:07 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: Just to clarify, is Distributism the preferred economic system of the trad movement as a whole? I feel like I see a lot of threads on this, but I haven't read any of them closely.

Distributism is an economic system which attempts to implement Catholic social teachings in a practical way.  Catholic social teachings are general principles, which require implementation by practical systems.

Among those traditionalists who agree with the social encyclicals' critique of capitalism and socialism, distributism is certainly the most accepted option.  (So much so that I can't really think of any others, off the top of my head.)  Sadly, many traditionalists do not accept that critique, something which I believe to be inconsistent.

Praise be to Christ the King!
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#20
(08-27-2009, 08:40 PM)dgoodmaniii Wrote: +AMDG

(08-27-2009, 04:07 PM)WilfredLeblanc Wrote: Just to clarify, is Distributism the preferred economic system of the trad movement as a whole? I feel like I see a lot of threads on this, but I haven't read any of them closely.

Distributism is an economic system which attempts to implement Catholic social teachings in a practical way.  Catholic social teachings are general principles, which require implementation by practical systems.

Among those traditionalists who agree with the social encyclicals' critique of capitalism and socialism, distributism is certainly the most accepted option.  (So much so that I can't really think of any others, off the top of my head.)  Sadly, many traditionalists do not accept that critique, something which I believe to be inconsistent.

Praise be to Christ the King!

Sorry, I've read a good deal about distributism and it seems totally impractical to me.  I've tried to keep an open mind, but as described from most modern sources, it seems like a government-driven system, whereby the government dictates and enforces the distribution of property and the formation of guilds, which leads to a totally crabbed economic system that will lower most people's standard of living.  That cannot be what the encyclicals are driving at. 
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