Obama to speak at Kennedy's "Catholic" Funeral.
#31
The nun used to say, "birds of a feather, flock together"
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#32
(08-27-2009, 08:36 PM)DarkKnight Wrote:
(08-27-2009, 08:19 PM)Baskerville Wrote:
(08-27-2009, 08:14 PM)DarkKnight Wrote:
(08-27-2009, 08:12 PM)Baskerville Wrote: What Osama wants is a universal socialist health system which is not Catholic.
If you strike health from that sentence, you pretty much have the whole Truth.

So your saying that the Catholic Church advocates Universalist healthcare? And I dont mean the USCCB in their pretty pink panties but the real Catholic Church pre Vatican II.
This is what I meant:
Quote:What Osama wants is a universal socialist ... system which is not Catholic.

Ahh Mea Culpa
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#33
(08-27-2009, 12:34 PM)timjp77 Wrote: Will this be the homily? As far as I know there's no part of a funeral Mass or any other Mass for that matter calling for a speach outside of the homily.

It really irritates me when so called "Catholic" funerals have eulogies.  A euology is perfectly acceptable before or after Mass but not during.

Horse, gate, bolted.  Once they brought in the Novus Ordo everything else was going to be make it up as you go along also.  I can't fathom people who believe we can reverse our way out of this quagmire and not still be covered in foul smelling sh*t.  The whole thing needs to be ditched, wholesale.  It's Divine intervention on this one if the Catholic Church is ever going to regain credibility.  I just cannot see how this can be patched up, the busts of the last 5 Popes put on display in the Vatican and the Church still claim indefectability a hundred years from now.
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#34
ABC News is on it: 'Win One for Teddy,' Say Dems Pushing for Health Reform.

Of course, they jumped all over Rush Limbaugh for pointing out that they're doing exactly that.  Some people who are quite happy to use a man's death to advance their political fortunes:
Quote:"You've heard of 'win one for the Gipper'? There is going to be an atmosphere of 'win one for Teddy,'" Ralph G. Neas, the CEO of the liberal National Coalition on Health Care, told ABC News.

"Ted Kennedy's dream of quality health care for all Americans will be made real this year because of his leadership and his inspiration," said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a statement.

"Ted would want nothing more than for his colleagues to continue his life's work and to make real his dream of quality health care for all Americans," said [Al] Gore.

"In his honor and as a tribute to his commitment to his ideals, let us stop the shouting and name calling and have a civilized debate on health care reform which I hope, when legislation has been signed into law, will bear his name for his commitment to insuring the health of every American," [Senator Robert] Byrd said.
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#35
(08-27-2009, 06:38 PM)DarkKnight Wrote: Obama will be playing the part of the voice of God, no doubt wearing his new robes from Notre Dame while assisting Father with the Consecration.
No doubt due in part of the "Morgan Freeman effect", a man who played both president and God on the big screen.

And the average boobus americanuswho nonstop ingests this Hollywood filth is too stupid or gullible to know the difference between delusion and reality.
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#36
(08-27-2009, 07:20 PM)SanctiDominici Wrote: Except the main reason this country was started was so persecuted christians could have a new land to practice in and the fact that 3/4 of the nation is christian. By my standards, thats a christian country
To my mind, there's a fundamental difference between a "Christian nation" and a "nation of Christians."  Also, please keep in mind that most of those Christians that were escaping persecution were die-hard Protestants who had no problem discriminating against Catholics when they showed up on these shores...
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#37
(08-27-2009, 09:29 PM)Mhoram Wrote: I don't think the body was even cold yet when I saw the first quote from a Democrat saying this might turn health care around, that people might want to pass it "in Teddy's memory," or some such nonsense.  Of course they'll take that angle if it helps; the end justifies the means.
Something that no Republican would ever dream of doing, right? ;)

(08-27-2009, 09:29 PM)Mhoram Wrote: I'm not sure that would work, though.  An awful lot of the articles about Kennedy today have brought up Chappaquiddick---far more than I expected, and probably more than it's been mentioned during his last dozen elections.  He's being lionized by the extreme Left, but the middle doesn't seem to have forgotten his faults.  I'm not sure turning Obamacare into Teddycare would help right now.  It's a little weird to see someone being criticized more after death than he was before it, but that might be happening.
Someone earlier was mentioning "media canonization."  I haven't been paying too much attention, but I'm glad to see some even-handedness on this score.
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#38
(08-27-2009, 12:34 PM)timjp77 Wrote: Will this be the homily? As far as I know there's no part of a funeral Mass or any other Mass for that matter calling for a speach outside of the homily.

It really irritates me when so called "Catholic" funerals have eulogies.  A euology is perfectly acceptable before or after Mass but not during.

Here is a good resource for funeral rites in the Ordinary Form http://www.seattlearch.org/NR/rdonlyres/...v_0509.pdf

I share with the poster an irritation over eulogies and rememberances at the Mass of Christian Burial.  The rubrics cited above expressly state:
Quote:FR 30. The Vigil is the most appropriate time for eulogies, lengthy remembrances, and reflections from family members.
FR 32. Eulogies are not allowed at the Funeral Mass; a brief remembrance by the person representing the family may be offered prior to the final commendation.

Unfortunately, rememborances by multiple people are sometimes a feature of recent funeral Masses I've been at, but at least they have always been after Communion [so, outside of the main part of the Mass: Offeratory, Consecration, Communion], and have never taken the place of the homily.

Last night, Thursday, I attended the Vigil Service for my 93 year old uncle.  The Priest held a full, formal vigil service (various forms are available) with readings from scripture, and a brief homily.  The Rosary was incorporated into the Vigil.  As there were non Catholics at the Vigil the priest gave a good explanation of the Rosary, and The Grand Knight from Pasco Council 1620 of the Knights of Columbus gave a brief introduction of why the Rosary is so important to the Knights.  After the rosary, those who wished could come forward to offer thoughts.  Then, the priest said a closing prayer and gave a blessing, after which, those who wished could come forward for the viewing, which the priest encouraged, and I believe it is good to look on the face of death.

One of my cousins told me that while planning the Mass of Christian Burial, the priest told them that there will not be a time for "sharing" - that is to be done either at the Vigil, or at the lunch following the Mass.  One person representing the family could read an obituary and offer a general remembrance, no longer than 5 minutes, after Communion, if they wished.  Hopefully this is a trend of priests following the book.
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#39
(08-28-2009, 10:34 AM)Pilgrim Wrote:
(08-27-2009, 09:29 PM)Mhoram Wrote: I don't think the body was even cold yet when I saw the first quote from a Democrat saying this might turn health care around, that people might want to pass it "in Teddy's memory," or some such nonsense.  Of course they'll take that angle if it helps; the end justifies the means.
Something that no Republican would ever dream of doing, right? ;)
(08-27-2009, 09:29 PM)Mhoram Wrote: I'm not sure that would work, though.  An awful lot of the articles about Kennedy today have brought up Chappaquiddick---far more than I expected, and probably more than it's been mentioned during his last dozen elections.  He's being lionized by the extreme Left, but the middle doesn't seem to have forgotten his faults.  I'm not sure turning Obamacare into Teddycare would help right now.  It's a little weird to see someone being criticized more after death than he was before it, but that might be happening.
Someone earlier was mentioning "media canonization."  I haven't been paying too much attention, but I'm glad to see some even-handedness on this score.


I know you are kind of joking re the bolded portion, and acknowledging the existence of partisan posturing by both parties, I don't recall any Republican saying after Reagan died in 2005 -- "Reagan's strength in confronting tyranny during the Cold War shows how we must expand/fight the war against terrorism, etc etc.  Let's pick up the Reagan cudgel and win one for the Gipper."  That would have been a perfect time to do it.  I think the political manipulation Ted's death for the purposes of the health care bill is bad, though I am not sure what the Republicans can do about it, other than note that the bill no better today than it was five seconds before Ted died.
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#40
(08-28-2009, 11:05 AM)moneil Wrote:
(08-27-2009, 12:34 PM)timjp77 Wrote: Will this be the homily? As far as I know there's no part of a funeral Mass or any other Mass for that matter calling for a speach outside of the homily.

It really irritates me when so called "Catholic" funerals have eulogies.  A euology is perfectly acceptable before or after Mass but not during.

Here is a good resource for funeral rites in the Ordinary Form http://www.seattlearch.org/NR/rdonlyres/...v_0509.pdf

I share with the poster an irritation over eulogies and rememberances at the Mass of Christian Burial.  The rubrics cited above expressly state:
Quote:FR 30. The Vigil is the most appropriate time for eulogies, lengthy remembrances, and reflections from family members.
FR 32. Eulogies are not allowed at the Funeral Mass; a brief remembrance by the person representing the family may be offered prior to the final commendation.

Unfortunately, rememborances by multiple people are sometimes a feature of recent funeral Masses I've been at, but at least they have always been after Communion [so, outside of the main part of the Mass: Offeratory, Consecration, Communion], and have never taken the place of the homily.

Last night, Thursday, I attended the Vigil Service for my 93 year old uncle.  The Priest held a full, formal vigil service (various forms are available) with readings from scripture, and a brief homily.  The Rosary was incorporated into the Vigil.  As there were non Catholics at the Vigil the priest gave a good explanation of the Rosary, and The Grand Knight from Pasco Council 1620 of the Knights of Columbus gave a brief introduction of why the Rosary is so important to the Knights.  After the rosary, those who wished could come forward to offer thoughts.  Then, the priest said a closing prayer and gave a blessing, after which, those who wished could come forward for the viewing, which the priest encouraged, and I believe it is good to look on the face of death.

One of my cousins told me that while planning the Mass of Christian Burial, the priest told them that there will not be a time for "sharing" - that is to be done either at the Vigil, or at the lunch following the Mass.  One person representing the family could read an obituary and offer a general remembrance, no longer than 5 minutes, after Communion, if they wished.  Hopefully this is a trend of priests following the book.
Not many Councils even know  where their Black Book is, let alone providing one to Father. Good on your council!
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