Kennedy Funeral
#31
I think the two most appropriate comments that I have heard over the last few days are 1. Once God places his hands on someone I take mine off, and 2. Let us not be judged by either our best moment in life, or by the worst, but how we lived the rest of the time.  As a catholic, I believe that it is not my place to judge anyone.  I will leave that to God.  Who am I to say how someone else chooses to practice their faith?
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#32
(08-30-2009, 01:50 AM)lori Wrote: I think the two most appropriate comments that I have heard over the last few days are 1. Once God places his hands on someone I take mine off, and 2. Let us not be judged by either our best moment in life, or by the worst, but how we lived the rest of the time.  As a catholic, I believe that it is not my place to judge anyone.  I will leave that to God.  Who am I to say how someone else chooses to practice their faith?

Regarding your comments:

1) Why?  The Catholic understanding is that you pray for mercy for the soul of the departed.  Your prayers after the death may have obtained grace prior to death for that person since God is not bound by time.  Catholics have an active mission for the souls of the departed both, before during and after death. 

2) We are judged and we must make an accounting for everything, best, worst and in-between.  Part of that, is how we acted in charity towards others.  And the highest form of charity is to help someone get to Heaven, not help them kill an unborn child out of convenience or emotional distress.  And other Catholics who do not reprimand and  oppose a person who commits, procures or legislates for the murder of children in the womb will have to account for their inaction that may have doomed people like the Senator and those who cooperated in his grave errors.  Also, a good absolution on your deathbed is the best moment of your life, since that is the one that determines where you spend Eternity.

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#33
I missed most of the funeral. I need a two hour nap every day. I'm not sticking up for teddy kennedy but it has been reported he confessed, received communion, and the anointing of the sick by his Parish Priest. If he received absolution and had attrition, not perfect contrition, firm purpose of amendment, his sins were forgiven. If this is true, and I don't think his Priest would lie, then objectively speaking, we have no bone to pick, and providing he had not mortally sinned after and up to his death, then teddy kennedy is in purgatory. God's mercy extends forever and those most in need are easily forgiven by God. 
just sayin' 's all,
tim
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#34
Contrary to what someone posted ... Im certainly  never  ashamed for  my catholic faith. Never was, Never will be. Im saddened by  some of the problems with some clergy who do not stand up for  what is right and true...
As far as the funeral mass, i read that there should not be an eulogie.......... also hiding  from the Catholic public those who  went up before Christ to receive a blessing or the Holy Eucharist was perhaps  sneaky? 
  To many forget, this is Christ's Church, His Life in us through His body and blood. Choose to  forget Christ to fit in with whomever, or stand up and defend ALL Christ taught. Life  from birth to death is precious and deserves compassion, love and healthcare in  full to natural death.. NATURAL DEATH.
God Bless the Schindler Family, Fr Pavone, Fr Eutenuer, Bishop Burke and many more for  their strength  in the fight for the  truth of Christ!
Thank you
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#35
Whatever that scandalous, nauseating event was, it most certainly was not a Catholic funeral mass. You can call it that, they can claim it is, but that don't make it so. Standard Novus Ordo self-congratulatory canonization service on a national scale. May God have mercy on his pitiful soul, and all those who participated in this horrific fraud.
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#36
(08-30-2009, 02:53 PM)Catholickay Wrote: God Bless the Schindler Family, Fr Pavone, Fr Eutenuer, Bishop Burke and many more...

Speaking of the Schindler family, Terry Schiavo's father died yesterday.

http://www.lifenews.com/bio2943.html

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#37
(08-30-2009, 11:47 AM)Gerard Wrote:
(08-30-2009, 01:50 AM)lori Wrote: I think the two most appropriate comments that I have heard over the last few days are 1. Once God places his hands on someone I take mine off, and 2. Let us not be judged by either our best moment in life, or by the worst, but how we lived the rest of the time.  As a catholic, I believe that it is not my place to judge anyone.  I will leave that to God.  Who am I to say how someone else chooses to practice their faith?

Regarding your comments:

1) Why?  The Catholic understanding is that you pray for mercy for the soul of the departed.  Your prayers after the death may have obtained grace prior to death for that person since God is not bound by time.  Catholics have an active mission for the souls of the departed both, before during and after death. 

2) We are judged and we must make an accounting for everything, best, worst and in-between.   Part of that, is how we acted in charity towards others.  And the highest form of charity is to help someone get to Heaven, not help them kill an unborn child out of convenience or emotional distress.  And other Catholics who do not reprimand and  oppose a person who commits, procures or legislates for the murder of children in the womb will have to account for their inaction that may have doomed people like the Senator and those who cooperated in his grave errors.  Also, a good absolution on your deathbed is the best moment of your life, since that is the one that determines where you spend Eternity.




I agree with is 100%, esp God not being bound by time. I have heard this before. Excellent point.
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#38
Like a steam locomotive rollin' down the track, he's gone. Gone. Nothin's going to bring him back.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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