Priestly garb question
#11
Rosarium Wrote:Don't lump all priests together. It is quite varied. Some NO priests do wear cassocks and obvious clerical clothes at all times, some traditional priests will wear casual clothes for sports and such.

Not trying to lump all priests together.  I am just stating my experience.  I just want to know what is "normal" on the streets. 
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#12
Clerical dress has been around at least as an option since probably the Nicene period. I believe it was around the time of the Tridentine reforms that the Church imposed clerics to wear a distinctive form of dress at all times; not for the modern reason we associate with them nowadays (that is, to identify them on the street in situations such as if someone was dying on the street and needed the Last Rites) but so they wouldn't be able to walk into a brothel, tavern, or other conspicuous place of ill repute without being identified as a "man of the cloth".

And by "cleric", I only mean priests and below. It's my understanding that the notion of a dress code for bishops is very modern, hence why in portraits of bishops throughout history, you'll see a very broad variety of styles.


Quote:How often do/should priests wear the cassock or the collar?  What was traditionally done?  Outside of the church grounds, how often do priests wear priestly garb?

So as I suggested, "traditionally" is relative. If you mean before Vatican II, well, clerical suits have been around since the turn of the 20th century, at least. There are many pictures around of WWI-era priests wearing knee-length frock coats and civilian top hats. Cassocks were worn primarily on the parish grounds or Church property. In the Victorian period, priests wore the cassock more regularly, along with the zuchetto. There's much evidence to suggest that our modern band collar was actually picked up from priests of the Anglican Church, not the other way around as is typically assumed. Before that, clerics wore much fuller-sized collars and/or the strips of cloth hanging down from the neck, as in images of St. Jean Vianney.

[Image: 122462-004-7956FF69.jpg]


I think an argument could be made that modern traditional priests who play soccer or ride bikes in cassocks are recreating a traditionalism that didn't actually historically exist. I'm sure some people here could think of an example of such-and-such a priest from the 1950's who actually did so, but that's not representative of clerical culture as a whole back then. Or I could be wrong....... it's not like I was actually there.
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#13

HAHA! Our priests are usually in a black dress shirt, dress pants and collar when they arent in a cassock! We had one priest who used to go bike riding in his cassock!
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I would think that might not only be difficult but also dangerous
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#14
[quote='The_Harlequin_King' pid='437995' dateline='1251742885']

Quote:[Image: 122462-004-7956FF69.jpg]

My aunty repairs statues, and had this statue, life sized in her house for years, in the corner of her living room....sleep overs were terrifying!
My cousins and i would alwysy sleep in the living room, with this one starting at us all nigt! With all due respect of course, but its quite intimidating face to face!
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#15
(08-31-2009, 02:21 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I think an argument could be made that modern traditional priests who play soccer or ride bikes in cassocks are recreating a traditionalism that didn't actually historically exist. I'm sure some people here could think of an example of such-and-such a priest from the 1950's who actually did so, but that's not representative of clerical culture as a whole back then. Or I could be wrong....... it's not like I was actually there.

I have heard that there are accounts of sisters skiing in full length habits back in the 50's... sounds extreme, especially in our habit-less age. But I could believe it.

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#16
(08-31-2009, 02:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 01:56 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: OUr priests will wera there cassocks most of the times, theres been the odd time i have seen them in pants and shirt, but always the collar

I have an NO Priest friend (who's learning the TLM) who always wears cassock and biretta on the street, except when he's jogging. Then he wears sweats or modest shorts and tee shirt. Saw him one day and started laughing. He said, laughing also, 'Don't look!" :laughing:

Your NO Priest friend says Low Mass every Saturday.  Is he learning Sung Masses?
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#17
(08-31-2009, 08:01 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 02:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 01:56 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: OUr priests will wera there cassocks most of the times, theres been the odd time i have seen them in pants and shirt, but always the collar

I have an NO Priest friend (who's learning the TLM) who always wears cassock and biretta on the street, except when he's jogging. Then he wears sweats or modest shorts and tee shirt. Saw him one day and started laughing. He said, laughing also, 'Don't look!" :laughing:

Your NO Priest friend says Low Mass every Saturday.  Is he learning Sung Masses?

Not sure, but I've served him when he sang the NO in Latin, so it shouldn't be much of a jump. Is he back in the city?
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#18
(08-31-2009, 08:04 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 08:01 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 02:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-31-2009, 01:56 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote: OUr priests will wera there cassocks most of the times, theres been the odd time i have seen them in pants and shirt, but always the collar

I have an NO Priest friend (who's learning the TLM) who always wears cassock and biretta on the street, except when he's jogging. Then he wears sweats or modest shorts and tee shirt. Saw him one day and started laughing. He said, laughing also, 'Don't look!" :laughing:

Your NO Priest friend says Low Mass every Saturday.  Is he learning Sung Masses?

Not sure, but I've served him when he sang the NO in Latin, so it shouldn't be much of a jump. Is he back in the city?

No, he's got a few more years in his country tour of pastoring 2 parishes at once.  Then probably a stint in the Western part of the Archdiocese before he gets back to civilization.  You know how it goes.

(This is purely conjecture)
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#19
(08-31-2009, 12:57 PM)Carthusian Wrote: How often do/should priests wear the cassock or the collar?  What was traditionally done?  Outside of the church grounds, how often do priests wear priestly garb?

I don't know offhand of any rule. I know that up through the 1970s, I never saw a priest without his collar. Or a nun without a habit. But that may have just been good luck.

Sadly, many priests shed the clerics if they're not doing "priesty" stuff. I can understand it if they're gardening or washing the car, or anything else that requires "grubbies." But I remember stopping by the rectory a few years ago to take care of something with the pastor. He was in his office, during normal office hours. Unless you knew him, you'd never know he was a priest! He was "at work" (leaving aside the whole issue that the priesthood is a vocation and not a job) That doesn't cut it with me. I wear a uniform at work. Mailmen do too. And cops. And firemen. Most retail clerks wear a  smock or a vest. Even the barrista at the coffee house wears an apron. Why not priests?

Then again, another priest I know who does wear his clerics a lot, told our Bible study that he was flying out of state for a week and wouldn't be there next week. When someone asked if he wore his collar, since it might help him get a free upgrade, he said, "No! I never wear my collar when I fly. I'll always get stuck next to someone who loves Catholic priests or hates Catholic priests, and either way, they'll talk at me the whole time!" 
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#20
A priest from my former NO parish is frequently out in public in his tennis shorts and a golf shirt.  I once saw him dining in a restaurant with a woman and he was attired like that.  I cannot for the life of me imagine any SSPX priest EVER doing such a thing.  (Either dressing like that OR doing out to dinner alone with one woman.)  But then, they know what it means to be a priest and they always remember who they are and whom they represent. :pray2:
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