Ugh..."Church in the Round" - ca. 1953!
#11
The National Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, Michigan, is also a "Church in the Round."  It was built between 1931 and 1936 during the reign of Pope Piux XI.  Its founding pastor was Fr. Charles Coughlin, the controversial radio priest of the 1930s.    

http://www.shrinechurch.com/photo_galler..._0993.html
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#12
The church at the Shrine of the North American Maryters is "in the round." This was to make it look like an Indian fortress, or villiage pallisade. 

Walty Wrote:This has no basis in tradition does it?

Bramante's plan for S. Peter's was in the shape of the Greek cross - achieving the same result as a church "in the round."
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#13
(09-06-2009, 07:42 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-06-2009, 07:08 AM)timjp77 Wrote: notice none of the women are wearing chapel veils.

None. Everybody wore hats. . at least in the USA.

Nothing screams "neo trad" more than a mantilla.

Photos of Protestant congregations in that time period would also show the women, including teenaged girls, wearing hats.  In general, if you went out of your home wearing high heels, you were also wearing a hat and gloves.  That was the case up until the late Sixties.  We started wearing veils sometimes in Catholic and Episcopal churches a few years earlier, influenced by Jackie Kennedy.  We didn't give up our hats, though, we just added veils as an option.  We looked very classy!  :wench:  So did the men in their hats.


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#14
Jackie Kennedy also popularized the pillbox hat (not that they didn't exist before her). To be honest the only time I remember her wearing a mantilla was at her husband's funeral, oh and when she visited the Pope (although I don't know if that was technically a mantilla).
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#15
The 60's didn't come from nowhere.  They came out of the 50's.

Trads often forget this.
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#16
In Hungary there was a round Church built in the 19th Century

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eszter...Church.JPG

The Church was an experiment weather the unusually large dome of the cathedral will hold. In that Church the altar is at the East side of the circle

As for the Holyoke Church I looked for the present Catholic Churches in Holyoke MA, neither of the three seems to be round. Is there any further information of the building?

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#17
(09-06-2009, 08:09 AM)anamchara Wrote: The National Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, Michigan, is also a "Church in the Round."  It was built between 1931 and 1936 during the reign of Pope Piux XI.  Its founding pastor was Fr. Charles Coughlin, the controversial radio priest of the 1930s.    

http://www.shrinechurch.com/photo_galler..._0993.html

I remember this church before the above renovation...............it was truly a shrine. First time I was ever there was for Christmas Mass in the early 70s. The priest was dressed up as Santa and the servers were dressed as elves, from what I remember most folks walked out in disgust - but the church itself was beautiful - not rounded out at that time. 
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#18
(09-06-2009, 07:42 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-06-2009, 07:08 AM)timjp77 Wrote: notice none of the women are wearing chapel veils.

None. Everybody wore hats. . at least in the USA.

Nothing screams "neo trad" more than a mantilla.

But most of the elderly women with whom I attend daily Mass wear a chapel veil, and I'm guessing that they always have.  Are they screaming "neo trad?"  That certainly has a negative connotation.
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#19
(09-06-2009, 07:42 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-06-2009, 07:08 AM)timjp77 Wrote: notice none of the women are wearing chapel veils.

None. Everybody wore hats. . at least in the USA.

Nothing screams "neo trad" more than a mantilla.

Or Spanish/Italian Catholics, who preferred the veils over hats.
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#20
My last parish church was in the round. I disliked it very much. The idea was to 'see Christ in each other' or some such theology of the community idea. I did not find that to be so. Rather my eyes always went past the altar to the distractions on the other side of it. And the pews were slanted which is one of my pet peeves since one must turn the neck to look directly at the altar.  We found a spot that was direct to the altar but still there are distractions. Terrible idea.

Now, thanks be to God, I am in a parish with a church that looks like a church. It is so comforting. The old altar on the back wall was never torn out  and the tabernacle is in the center of it. Now we do not have Mass there again yet, but maybe one day?  And some of the communion rail was left as well. I hope to see that used again too.
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