Ugh..."Church in the Round" - ca. 1953!
#31
(09-06-2009, 02:37 PM)Walty Wrote: Doesn't really cover their hair though.

Neither do the little chapel veils.
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#32
(09-06-2009, 02:52 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-06-2009, 02:40 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The issue isn't what they are wearing, but the fact their heads are covered.

A typical lacy veil as seen in many American parishes (mostly TLM) is tradition in that the heads are covered, not that the method is historical.

What difference does it make - if one is ogling at hair or at a lovely lacy mantilla that covers the hair? If the purpose of a headdress (outside of giving honor to God) is to detract attention,

Covering the head is a symbol of modesty and to show a woman has an authority over her (i.e., a husband or father), and by fulfilling those purposes she gives honor to God.

The purpose is not to detract attention, though it certainly shouldn't overtly attract attention either.  It doesn't matter how much hair is covered because its purpose is not to cover the hair, but the head.
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#33
(09-06-2009, 02:52 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: What difference does it make - if one is ogling at hair or at a lovely lacy mantilla that covers the hair? If the purpose of a headdress (outside of giving honor to God) is to detract attention, then why are mantillas the fodder of a gazillion threads around here? Not to mention the embarrassing gushing of men. Those lacy covers have become a source of vanity. They are as fussed over by trads today as hats were fussed over by women of the past.
Then nothing has changed. I don't think it is a matter of attention, but modesty and proper adherence to the law of the Church.

I am stuck at a NO parish, where the congregation is normally casual, but the rare mantilla does catch my eye if I see it, but it is not the same as a man seeing an immodest woman. Even a sister who is normally very unflashy in their dress attracts attention depending on the situation.

Proverbs 31:30 Wrote:Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: the woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised.
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#34

So beautiful. Much better than bare heads.

[Image: b6aaff829fe2fb92_large]

Children of Mary at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Catholic Church praying for their parishoners serving in the armed forces at mass on first anniversary of Pearl Harbor.

Location:     Bridgeport, CT, US
Date taken:     December 1942
Photographer    Alfred Eisenstaedt
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#35
(09-06-2009, 07:42 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(09-06-2009, 07:08 AM)timjp77 Wrote: notice none of the women are wearing chapel veils.

None. Everybody wore hats. . at least in the USA.

Nothing screams "neo trad" more than a mantilla.

Ain't that the truth.
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#36
(09-06-2009, 03:14 PM)stvincentferrer Wrote: So beautiful. Much better than bare heads.

[Image: b6aaff829fe2fb92_large]

Children of Mary at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Catholic Church praying for their parishoners serving in the armed forces at mass on first anniversary of Pearl Harbor.

Location:      Bridgeport, CT, US
Date taken:      December 1942
Photographer    Alfred Eisenstaedt

What's the occasion?  They all seem to be wearing the same thing.

And, would ya look at all them American flags in the sanctuary...
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#37
(09-06-2009, 02:33 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I never saw a mantilla in my life but on Jackie Kennedy and Grace Kelly - ONCE. Peasant girls from Spain and Portugal wore long veils - not the lacy ones, but the kind you see the Fatima children wearing. When American school girls went to School Mass, we had scarves or beanies that matched our school uniforms. Chapel veils came in handy when we LOST our scarf or beanie. On Sundays, baby girls wore bonnets and young girls wore hats, like their mothers.

I don't like lace mantillas or veils being paraded as "traditional" by today's American trads - unless you want to return to the Middle Ages. Even in that case, don't know how many average Europeans wore "lace." In Pre-Vatican II America, they were not the typical headdress. Rather THIS was typical...
[Image: 51VH6SPRZHL._SS500_.jpg]

I feel the same way.
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#38
Um.. St. Vincent Ferrer, we wore long veils for First Communion too. We would also wear our first communion dresses on other special occasions such as May Crownings and rosary rallies. Veils were also worn at weddings and funerals. That picture you have there is very beautiful indeed but does not represent typical Sunday garb.
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#39
(09-06-2009, 04:34 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Um.. St. Vincent Ferrer, we wore long veils for First Communion too. We would also wear our first communion dresses on other special occasions such as May Crownings and rosary rallies. Veils were also worn at weddings and funerals. That picture you have there is very beautiful indeed but does not represent typical Sunday garb.

UM . . . I know. But head coverings on women are beautiful, inside and outside, which is why I posted it.
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#40
CollegeCatholic Wrote:What's the occasion?

It looks like a First Communion or Comfirmation. As such, one would hesitate to consider it standard dress.

Quote:And, would ya look at all them American flags in the sanctuary...

Wow. I've seen that photo before and never noticed that.
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