Help for a student of mine...
#1
So, my tenth graders have just finished discussing Augustine.  We've read Books II and VIII of Confessions and selections from Book XIX of Concerning the City of God.  Of course, one of the issues we've been grappling with is the idea of original sin.  One of my students feels quite passionately about the matter and is trying to wrap her head around it.  I want to point her in the direction of some books or essays on the subject and I need some help from the tank.

The student is very bright and well-read, but I don't want to bog her down in the minutia of theological discourse nor do I want to just hand her a copy of the Catechism.  She has read a lot of Lewis, so books in that vein would probably be well-received.  She comes from a Christian family (though not Catholic; I think they're evangelicals).  I've asked her mother to allow me to give her this list (we're a public school, so I'm covering my butt here).  My intention is not to convert, but to inform.

So, can anyone help me out?
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#2
Well, if she is really interested in looking at it from a philosophical or theological perspective, Augustine has done well to already explain it. But you should point her to the Summa Theologica. I would tell her to read the (sed contra) "on the contrary" and "I answer that" first, before reading the objections, which is how most scholars approach the summa, to put the objections in context. If she reads what St. Thomas has written about original sin, I don't doubt she will become interested a lot more in Catholicism.

You can give her this direct link if you would like: http://www.google.com/search?q=oiriginal+sin+site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fnewadvent.org%2Fsumma%2F&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

It is basically where St. Thomas mentions original sin in the Summa, everytime.

another good site she might be interested in exploring is:

http://iteadthomam.blogspot.com

This one is very academic and has the most sound theological discourse and compendium of philosophical and theological links on the internet I could find, she will become Catholic in no time if she even spends a remote amount of time parousing those sites.

Hope that helps. If you are looking for more "book" type of information, printed I mean, then I would just find maybe a doctor of the church or another saint's writings who have written extensively on the subject and give it to her, there are so many it's almost intimidating to start looking.  ;)
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#3
I'd suggest you push more Augustine. I've gotten a lot out of the Confessions and just a few days ago when talking in history class to my students about Augustine, I told them that while we don't have the copies available now, I think that before they graduate high school they need to read the Confessions at least twice.

There's a great deal you can do with the rest of the Confessions, and if you're in KYA mode, it's fairly safe because the Protties love Augustine and even better, it's merely an extension of something you've already assigned, so it's not "indoctrination" it's just related material for someone who is interested in more material.

St. Thomas is also a good resource, but it's easy to get overwhelmed by the Summa.
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#4
Yeah, more Augustine. The Soliloquies maybe. Pre-Catholic stuff.
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#5
Just a related post:
Being a public school teacher, how are you able to teach Augustine? Is it a western civilization class?
I am surprised that you are able to discuss topics like original sin, I went to Catholic school and public school and we never read anything at all from Christian history.
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#6
(10-09-2009, 04:26 AM)winoblue1 Wrote: Just a related post:
Being a public school teacher, how are you able to teach Augustine? Is it a western civilization class?
I am surprised that you are able to discuss topics like original sin, I went to Catholic school and public school and we never read anything at all from Christian history.
It is a Western Civ class.  Plus, we're a charter school in a rather conservative part of the country, so we have fewer limits on our curriculum.  However, I'm still waiting for the day my class provokes a firestorm of criticism and I end up on *The O'Reilly Factor*...  ;D

Please keep the ideas coming!  We read Aquinas too, though I focus more on his views on free will and natural law than original sin.
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