Favorite Cheese and luncheon meats, etc
#21
(10-24-2009, 10:13 PM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote: I don't know, I have heard the brits come up with some weird combos like deep-fried Mars bars and well the scots have haggis.  and well people in New Guinea drink the cremated remains of their dead, but that not exactly for culinary reasons.  Of course, recently I did hear about and see deep fried butter at the county fair, what compels a person to do such a thing, I don't know. 

And then, there's "Scrapple"
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#22
Genoa salami & provolone.  Capicola with oil.  Roast beef with Swiss and horseradish.

But, to echo earlier thread comments, the Reuben is the king of sandwiches.  A lifetime spent looking for the perfect Reuben would not be a life spent in vain.
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#23
FYI; if you make cornmeal in a skillet and add Parmigiano Reggiano it is called Polenta in Italy. If you cook it in a skillet to dry like cornbread, remove it, slice it in two halves with a string, then add Swiss or Gruyere it is called my Nona's polenta. And you guys thought it came from Arkansas. Don't get out much, huh?
tim
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#24
Yeah, yeah. Italians stole corn pone from the Native Americans and convinced the world it was their idea. Just like their rip off of the tomato. I'll bet you think the potato is Irish, too. :pazzo:
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#25
(10-27-2009, 09:38 AM)timoose Wrote: FYI; if you make cornmeal in a skillet and add Parmigiano Reggiano it is called Polenta in Italy. If you cook it in a skillet to dry like cornbread, remove it, slice it in two halves with a string, then add Swiss or Gruyere it is called my Nona's polenta. And you guys thought it came from Arkansas. Don't get out much, huh?
tim

and if you use white course ground cornmeal and cook it in a pot and add a LOT of butter, it's called grits.

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#26
(10-27-2009, 10:01 AM)kimbaichan Wrote: Yeah, yeah. Italians stole corn pone from the Native Americans and convinced the world it was their idea. Just like their rip off of the tomato. I'll bet you think the potato is Irish, too. :pazzo:

!!

:o

:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:
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#27
Yea,Yea, if you substitute farina it is called Farina in Genoa, and no Indians, Mexicans, or French men were hurt in the making of it. ;D
Seriously, do you guys understand that NO One in all of Europe knew how to cook until my cousin Catherine Di Medici went to France?
You'd still be hunter gathers with small farms and eating boiled turnips. Apologies to the Irish as this is their haute cuisine. :o
tim
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#28
(10-27-2009, 10:01 AM)kimbaichan Wrote: Yeah, yeah. Italians stole corn pone from the Native Americans and convinced the world it was their idea. Just like their rip off of the tomato. I'll bet you think the potato is Irish, too. :pazzo:

Next, you'll be talking about BBQ, and saying that pork shoulder is better than beef brisket...
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#29
(10-27-2009, 10:01 AM)kimbaichan Wrote: Yeah, yeah. Italians stole corn pone from the Native Americans and convinced the world it was their idea. Just like their rip off of the tomato. I'll bet you think the potato is Irish, too. :pazzo:

Yeah, yeah, yeah -- and the Chinese invented spaghetti, too.  Just remember, whether you are talking pasta, pizza, tomatoes, polenta, or romanza, for that matter, regardless of who "invented" it, it took the Italians to bring it to perfection.
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#30
(10-30-2009, 10:53 AM)epalinurus Wrote: Yeah, yeah, yeah -- and the Chinese invented spaghetti, too.  Just remember, whether you are talking pasta, pizza, tomatoes, polenta, or romanza, for that matter, regardless of who "invented" it, it took the Italians to bring it to perfection.

*Ahem!*
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