Is a priest free to offer Mass according to any Roman Catholic Rite?
#1
Fellow Fish Eaters,

Might someone be able to tell me whether a Roman Catholic priest in good standing is free to offer Mass according to any Roman Catholic Rite, viz., any variant of the Roman Rite? Clearly, according to Quo Primum and Summorum Pontificum, such Rites as those of Sarum, Lyons and the like are not abrogated. Does a priest have to be in the British Isles, for instance, if he wishes to use the Sarum Rite? Does he have to be in Lyons to make use of that Archdiocese's Rite, or may he do so anywhere in France, or even outside of that country? Is the Ambrosian Rite authorised only in the Archdiocese of Milan, or may it be said by any priest anywhere? What are the canonical dispositions in this regard?

What, additionally, of monastic Rites, and of local Breviaries?

Thank you in advance for your answers.
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#2
I have no citations, but I don't think they can. A Latin rite priest can only celebrate the mass in the Latin rite (and since the TLM is the Latin rite, they can celebrate it...this is weirdness not a norm).
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#3
Does anyone know what the norms were in the past?  I would agree that it seems from the documents in question that these liturgies were not abrogated, but that would suggest to me that the norms revert to those held in place since Trent.  Id est, if a priest in the U.S. could celebrate the Ambrosian Rite in 1920, he could do so now.  If a priest in Italy could use Sarum Rite in 1840, he could do so now.  The question is, what were the old rules?
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#4
In August's issue of 'Mass of Ages' (the quarterly of the England and Wales Latin Mass Society) there is printed a letter from Msgr. Perl which seems to state that Summorum Pontificum allows priests to celebrate all traditional Latin rites. I can't find it online, so I'll type it out myself:

Mass of Ages Wrote:Reverend Father,
Your letter of January 7 2009 has had our attention but is still waiting for a reply. You express a desire to 'receive the comfort of having the approval of the possibility that also your Ambrosian students [of the Collegio Papio at Ascona] who ask for it can enjoy the benefits guaranteed by the Holy Father in the Motu Proprio, 'Summorum Pontificum'.'
While it is true that the Motu Proprio of the Holy Father does not expressly cite the Ambrosian rite, it does not exclude the other Latin rites; if the will of the Holy Father asserts for the Roman rite, considered superior in dignity, consequently much more for the other Latin rites, including the Ambrosian rite.
Wishing the blessing of the Lord on your pedagogical work, I greet you fraternally.

Camille Perl
Vice president

Edit:

OK, looking at the OP more closely, I see I didn't exactly answer the question. The letter I quoted doesn't say anything specifically about whether or not you would have to be in the right place to use the rite. The letter seems to be a response to a priest who is in a place that would normally use the Ambrosian rite.

Still, it suggests there is a lot of freedom for the other rites. Perhaps any priest could use any variation of the Latin rite, provided he has some good reason.
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#5
The Church has binding and loosing power. Only the Quo Primum and the Summorum Pontificium allowed parallel rites explicitly. The MIssale Romanum (Paul VI 04-03-1969) is ambivalent
http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/pope0262r.htm

11-01-1911
We command, therefore, all the patriarchs, archbishops, bishops, abbots and other prelates of the church, not excepting even the cardinal archpriests of the patriarchal basilicas of the city, to take care to introduce at the appointed time into their respective dioceses, churches or monasteries, the psaltery with the rules and rubrics as arranged by us; and the psaltery and these rules and rubrics we order to be also inviolately used and observed by all others who are under the obligation of reciting or chanting the canonical hours. In the meanwhile it shall be lawful for everybody and for the chapters themselves, provided the majority of the chapter be in favor, to use duly the new order of the psaltery immediately after its publication.
http://sanctaliturgia.blogspot.com/2005/...glish.html


03-23-1955
4. All particular indults and customs, even those worthy of special
mention, if contrary to these ordinances, are to be considered as
expressly revoked.
http://divinumofficium.com/www/horas/Hel...s/1955.txt

07-25-1960
6. Omnes denique ad quos spectat quamprimurn Calendaria et Propria, sive dioecesana sive religiosa, ad normam et mentem novae redactionis rubricarum et calendarii conformari curent, a S. Rituum Congregatione approbanda.
http://divinumofficium.com/www/horas/Hel...uctum.html

Today only the Ordinary or the Extraordinary Forms (1962) are allowed
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#6
(10-26-2009, 12:43 PM)glgas Wrote: Today only the Ordinary or the Extraordinary Forms (1962) are allowed

Actually, the Sarum Rite has been celebrated by Catholic priests on several occasions in the past few decades, most notably in 2000 by Mario Conti, currently Archbishop of Glasgow, then Bishop of Aberdeen. Less extraordinarily, the (reformed) Ambrosian Rite is still used in the Archdiocese of Milan, the Mozarabic Rite is celebrated daily in the Cathedral of Toledo (and at least twice a year in all churches of Toledo), and the Rite of Braga in Portugal; I also recall that a Mass according to the Rite of Braga was said in the US (New York?) earlier this year.
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#7
The fact that the other rites have been used sparingly does not necessarily imply universal permission to do so.  It is entirely possible that special permissions were given to use such rites in those specific circumstances.  Furthermore, the use of the Bragan Rite in Braga, the Mozarabic Rite in Toledo, the Ambrosian Rite in Milan, the Sarum Rite in Salisbury, &c. does not in any way answer the above question.  Even if no special permission is required to use these rites in their traditional churches, that does not necessarily imply that universal permission has been given for them to be used anywhere in the world.
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#8
(10-26-2009, 01:27 PM)FrancisB Wrote: The fact that the other rites have been used sparingly does not necessarily imply universal permission to do so.  It is entirely possible that special permissions were given to use such rites in those specific circumstances.  Furthermore, the use of the Bragan Rite in Braga, the Mozarabic Rite in Toledo, the Ambrosian Rite in Milan, the Sarum Rite in Salisbury, &c. does not in any way answer the above question.  Even if no special permission is required to use these rites in their traditional churches, that does not necessarily imply that universal permission has been given for them to be used anywhere in the world.

Whence my question.

The Sarum Rite has been used around the British Isles, though, and, as I noted, the Rite of Braga was used in the US earlier this year.

ETA: I do not know if the priest who celebrated the latter Mass sought the authorisation of the Archbishop of New York.
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#9
(10-26-2009, 12:43 PM)glgas Wrote: Today only the Ordinary or the Extraordinary Forms (1962) are allowed

Must come as a surprise to the Dominicans, Carmelites and Benedictines who are using their Traditional Rites on a regular basis! :)
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#10
(10-26-2009, 01:36 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(10-26-2009, 12:43 PM)glgas Wrote: Today only the Ordinary or the Extraordinary Forms (1962) are allowed

Must come as a surprise to the Dominicans, Carmelites and Benedictines who are using their Traditional Rites on a regular basis! :)

Maybe he means for the Latin rite priests we see, the ones who are allowed to use the NO or the TLM without special permission.
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