Calling All Recipes for Cookbook
#11
(11-02-2009, 07:23 PM)Texican Wrote:
(11-02-2009, 05:09 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Wholly Roamin' Sandwich
2 slices white bread
1/3 C marinara sauce, chilled

Apply marinara evenly to one side of one slice of bread.  Top with remaining slice.

Eat while leaning over kitchen sink to avoid washing a dish.

Repeat as necessary.

Dude!  You eat that?

Yes.  And it's delicious!

If you need to flex your food credibility, you can "deconstruct" it.  Whereupon it's just a breadstick (er, a slice of one) and a dipping sauce.  But I'm old school and don't deconstruct things that don't need to be pulled apart.
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#12
(11-02-2009, 06:02 PM)Ignatius_of_Loyola Wrote:
(11-02-2009, 05:09 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Wholly Roamin' Sandwich
2 slices white bread
1/3 C marinara sauce, chilled

Apply marinara evenly to one side of one slice of bread.  Top with remaining slice.

Eat while leaning over kitchen sink to avoid washing a dish.

Repeat as necessary.

Sweet.  Anything and everything folks, even the simple stuff.   As folks have discussed... Knights are generally family men with our loving and caring wives who for some reason put up with our involvement.  So any sort of quick recipe tricks are good too...

@WhollyRoaminCatholic... send me your name & email in PM and I'll be sure you get credit for it.

Haha, list it as "An Anonymous Knight from Council 2332, Shawnee, Kansas who was a bachelor for a long time".
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#13
(11-02-2009, 07:33 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(11-02-2009, 07:23 PM)Texican Wrote: [quote='WhollyRoaminCatholic' pid='466178' dateline='1257196162']


Dude!  You eat that?

Yes.  And it's delicious!

If you need to flex your food credibility, you can "deconstruct" it.  Whereupon it's just a breadstick (er, a slice of one) and a dipping sauce.  But I'm old school and don't deconstruct things that don't need to be pulled apart.

!!!!


my apologies.

:asianbow:
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#14
(11-02-2009, 07:33 PM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Yes.  And it's delicious!

If you need to flex your food credibility, you can "deconstruct" it.  Whereupon it's just a breadstick (er, a slice of one) and a dipping sauce.  But I'm old school and don't deconstruct things that don't need to be pulled apart.

Can't you at least toast the bread first, and slather some butter on it, or olive oil?

I'm gonna go read a cookbook now...
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#15
Pork tenderloins with roasted root vegetables

2 pork tenderloins, about 1lb ea.
1/4 cup olive oil, more or less.
Salt, to taste - preferably, coarsely-ground sea salt, or kosher salt
Freshly-ground black pepper, to taste.

Marinade:
1/4 cup red wine, or whatever you have on hand
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 - 3 garlic cloves, crushed
1/4 cup onion, chopped

Combine marinade ingredients and pour over tenderloins, then cover, and allow to marinate overnight in refrigerator ( or at least two hours).  When ready to cook, take out of fridge, remove from marinade, and drizzle with olive oil, to coat.  Place in center of lightly oiled rectangular baking dish.

Set oven to 425 F, and prepare vegetables while oven comes to temperature.


Vegetables:
About 3 lbs root vegetables - I normally use peeled turnips, new potatoes, carrots, and onions.
3/4 cup mayonnaise ( I prefer to use Alioli, a Catalan, mayonnaise-like sauce, made with olive oil, garlic, salt, and vinegar or lemon juice.  Sometimes, egg yolks are added).
6 - 7 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
Salt, to taste
Coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste
dash Spanish paprika
2 tbsp grated, aged cheese ( Parmesan, or similar )


If not using Alioli, combine mayonnaise, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper in large mixing bowl.  Cut vegetables into ( about ) 1 inch pieces, then place in mixing bowl, and toss to thoroughly coat them.  Place vegetables in baking dish, around tenderloins.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and sprinkle with paprika and grated cheese.  Put in oven, and cook for approximately 30 minutes, or until the internal temperature of the meat is 150 F.  If vegetables aren't fully cooked at this time, remove the tenderloins, and roast the vegetables for an additional 5 to 7 minutes, while letting the meat rest.
To serve, slice the tenderloin in 1/2 to 3/4 in. pieces, and serve with roasted vegetables, and some slices of hearty bread.

If you used Alioli for the vegetables, drizzle a little more over the meat medallions, if desired.

Bon profit!


Here's a recipe for Alioli, if you'd like to try that, instead of mayonnaise.  This one includes eggs, so it's easier to make than the traditional.





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#16
Are you only looking for recipes for main courses, or are appetizers, and the like, allowed?
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#17
Anything and everything... there's not really a theme per se to the book.
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#18
(11-05-2009, 06:13 PM)Texican Wrote: Pork tenderloins with roasted root vegetables

2 pork tenderloins, about 1lb ea.
1/4 cup olive oil, more or less.
Salt, to taste - preferably, coarsely-ground sea salt, or kosher salt
Freshly-ground black pepper, to taste.

Marinade:
1/4 cup red wine, or whatever you have on hand
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 - 3 garlic cloves, crushed
1/4 cup onion, chopped

Combine marinade ingredients and pour over tenderloins, then cover, and allow to marinate overnight in refrigerator ( or at least two hours).  When ready to cook, take out of fridge, remove from marinade, and drizzle with olive oil, to coat.  Place in center of lightly oiled rectangular baking dish.

Set oven to 425 F, and prepare vegetables while oven comes to temperature.


Vegetables:
About 3 lbs root vegetables - I normally use peeled turnips, new potatoes, carrots, and onions.
3/4 cup mayonnaise ( I prefer to use Alioli, a Catalan, mayonnaise-like sauce, made with olive oil, garlic, salt, and vinegar or lemon juice.  Sometimes, egg yolks are added).
6 - 7 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
Salt, to taste
Coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste
dash Spanish paprika
2 tbsp grated, aged cheese ( Parmesan, or similar )


If not using Alioli, combine mayonnaise, chopped garlic, salt, and pepper in large mixing bowl.  Cut vegetables into ( about ) 1 inch pieces, then place in mixing bowl, and toss to thoroughly coat them.  Place vegetables in baking dish, around tenderloins.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and sprinkle with paprika and grated cheese.  Put in oven, and cook for approximately 30 minutes, or until the internal temperature of the meat is 150 F.  If vegetables aren't fully cooked at this time, remove the tenderloins, and roast the vegetables for an additional 5 to 7 minutes, while letting the meat rest.
To serve, slice the tenderloin in 1/2 to 3/4 in. pieces, and serve with roasted vegetables, and some slices of hearty bread.

If you used Alioli for the vegetables, drizzle a little more over the meat medallions, if desired.

Bon profit!


Here's a recipe for Alioli, if you'd like to try that, instead of mayonnaise.  This one includes eggs, so it's easier to make than the traditional.

Thank you for this... it looks really good.  Could you send me your name (PM if you'd like), so that I can ensure you get credit for it?

IoL
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#19
(11-09-2009, 11:58 AM)Ignatius_of_Loyola Wrote: Thank you for this... it looks really good.  Could you send me your name (PM if you'd like), so that I can ensure you get credit for it?

IoL

Thanks, but you can just use 'Texican' if you wish.

wouldn't want people to know that I cook...
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#20
A classic Catalan appetizer or even an accompaniment to a meal - Pa amb tomàquet (bread with tomato):

Some slices of hearty bread, about ½” to ¾” thick; perhaps a sourdough, but not an ‘airy’ bread.  Make it about two per person.
Some very ripe, small tomatoes
Some sea salt, to taste
A little olive oil, to drizzle on the bread, at the very end
Maybe a couple of large cloves of garlic, peeled and halved, crosswise

First, toast the bread on both sides.  You can use a hot griddle, a charcoal grill, or even your broiler.
While the bread is toasting, cut the tomatoes in half, depending on the size.  You may need to quarter them, if they are rather large.  You’ll usually use one piece of tomato per slice of bread, so you can place a slice of bread, a piece of tomato, and half-clove of garlic, if using, per plate, per person.
If using the garlic, rub the cut garlic on the bread, then follow with the tomato.  You may want to squeeze the tomato a bit first, to get a little of the water out, as what you really want is the pulp to be ‘ground’ into the bread.  Then, sprinkle a little bit of salt over that, and follow with a little bit of olive oil.
This stuff is simple, but fantastic.  As a ‘tapa,’ you can also serve it with some very thinly sliced serrano ham, or prosciutto, if you have it, along with some sliced manchego cheese, as an open-faced sandwich.

Good stuff!
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