Attending Protestant Weddings
#11
It's pretty clear, it is in the Gospel.  Matthew Chapter 10.

“Do not think that I come to bring the peace upon earth: I came not to send peace but the sword. For I come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; and the man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He, who loves father or mother more than Me, is not worthy of Me; and he, who loves son or daughter more than Me, is not worthy of Me. And he, who does not take up his cross and follow Me, is not worthy of Me”

I'm not sure how much clearer it could be.
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#12
beware the ides Wrote:Lisa, I hope you've confessed.  

I've never confessed because I never thought about it being a sin until now. I'll ask my priest about it next time I go to confession.

beware the ides Wrote:What about your father.  He is now in an adulterous relationship with a woman to whom he is not legally married.  This is no different than Patrick Kennedy telling the Church that their position on abortion is wrong and that he is "no less a Catholic."  Just sayin....

My father is deceased. He was raised a nominal Methodist (they never really went to church) and came into the Catholic Church when he got engaged to my mother who insisted he become Catholic before she married him. After their wedding Dad was a "Christmas & Easter Catholic." I hate to say it -- but the Faith was never in his heart. After he and Mom divorced in 1970 (the divorce was her idea, not his), Dad cleaned up a life of alcoholism and got seriously involved with the Lutheran Church, read the Bible every day, headed the youth group, and for the first time in his life was serious about a relationship with Christ. He remarried a woman in that same Lutheran church in 1986. He died ten years later in 1996. The only two times I set foot in that church was for his wedding and his funeral. I loved my Dad dearly. We were very close. He was a good father. We had many debates about religion but they were always charitable. My siblings and I were not thrilled when he chose to remarry (my mother - still living – refused to seek an annulment and never remarried), but we wanted Dad to be happy. To be honest, the only reason we hesitated attending his wedding was out of respect for our mother. But she insisted we go and gave us her blessing.

- Lisa
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#13
To the OP...it is really tough making this stand with family. My husbands brother is a baptized non practicing catholic. His "wife" is Lutheran. They got married by JP. I had to hand back my bridesmaid dress and not attend. It sucks...but I had to choose between my bro in law and God, of course I chose God.
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#14
(11-10-2009, 06:30 PM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote: SaintRafael, you are mistaken.  Catholics may not attend non-Catholic weddings (or funerals or other worship services).  Not only may they not attend the wedding, they may not attend the reception nor send a gift.wrong and that he is "no less a Catholic." 

That's not true.  You may attend provided you do not actively participate in an act of worship.  I should know, as I wrongly did just that.  I should have refused to be a friend's groomsman, but I did not.  But it's okay to be a passive witness as there is nothing wrong with the marriage itself.  Plus, if the brother was only baptized Catholic but never raised in the Faith, then he's in the same position as any Protestant baptized as a child.  If he never learned the Faith, I'm not sure the Church treats him as an all-out formal heretic when he does something like marry outside the Church.  Baptism is always Catholic, so if he'd been baptized in a Luthern church he'd be in a similar situation.  *If* the brother was never raised in the Faith.
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#15
(11-10-2009, 06:30 PM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote: Lisa, I hope you've confessed.  What about your father.  He is now in an adulterous relationship with a woman to whom he is not legally married. 

One can't sin by accident.

Any sin, however small, would have been absolved during confession after that date, so there is no need to bring it up again.
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#16
Lisa,

I'm sorry.  I presumed too much.  I too was unaware of this and attended several non-Catholic weddings in the past.  Like Rosarium said, the conditions of mortal sin are not met.  I confess those things anyway...just for good measure.
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#17
(11-11-2009, 12:16 AM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote: Lisa,

I'm sorry.  I presumed too much.  I too was unaware of this and attended several non-Catholic weddings in the past.  Like Rosarium said, the conditions of mortal sin are not met.  I confess those things anyway...just for good measure.

I do too.  :)
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#18
(11-10-2009, 11:13 PM)Bonifacius Wrote: That's not true.  You may attend provided you do not actively participate in an act of worship.  I should know, as I wrongly did just that.  I should have refused to be a friend's groomsman, but I did not.  But it's okay to be a passive witness as there is nothing wrong with the marriage itself.  Plus, if the brother was only baptized Catholic but never raised in the Faith, then he's in the same position as any Protestant baptized as a child.  If he never learned the Faith, I'm not sure the Church treats him as an all-out formal heretic when he does something like marry outside the Church.  Baptism is always Catholic, so if he'd been baptized in a Luthern church he'd be in a similar situation.  *If* the brother was never raised in the Faith.

Bonifacus, you are misinformed.  Please listen to the series on this topic on audiosancto and/or consult a traditional priest for clarification.  A wedding MUST be Catholic in it's form and intent for the marriage to be considered valid (or a special dispensation must be granted).  Catholics are not permitted to attend (even as a "passive witness") non-Catholic cermonies.  If the marriage is not valid, then the couple are living in an adulterous relationship (i.e. because they aren't married).

This explains it very well - http://www.audiosancto.org/sermon/200705...art-1.html
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#19
(11-11-2009, 12:36 AM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote:
(11-10-2009, 11:13 PM)Bonifacius Wrote: That's not true.  You may attend provided you do not actively participate in an act of worship.  I should know, as I wrongly did just that.  I should have refused to be a friend's groomsman, but I did not.  But it's okay to be a passive witness as there is nothing wrong with the marriage itself.  Plus, if the brother was only baptized Catholic but never raised in the Faith, then he's in the same position as any Protestant baptized as a child.  If he never learned the Faith, I'm not sure the Church treats him as an all-out formal heretic when he does something like marry outside the Church.  Baptism is always Catholic, so if he'd been baptized in a Luthern church he'd be in a similar situation.  *If* the brother was never raised in the Faith.

Bonifacus, you are misinformed.  Please listen to the series on this topic on audiosancto and/or consult a traditional priest for clarification.  A wedding MUST be Catholic in it's form and intent for the marriage to be considered valid (or a special dispensation must be granted).  Catholics are not permitted to attend (even as a "passive witness") non-Catholic cermonies.  If the marriage is not valid, then the couple are living in an adulterous relationship (i.e. because they aren't married).

This explains it very well - http://www.audiosancto.org/sermon/200705...art-1.html
Actually...your wrong. I have consulted 3 different priests on this matter, and gotten the same answer. If 2 non catholic people (not baptized Catholic) get married by JP, or whatever, YES its a valid marriage. they are taking vows, and their vows are valid. If either one of them are baptized Catholic, practicing or not, its invalid.
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#20
(11-11-2009, 12:40 AM)CanadianCatholic Wrote:
(11-11-2009, 12:36 AM)Beware_the_Ides Wrote:
(11-10-2009, 11:13 PM)Bonifacius Wrote: That's not true.  You may attend provided you do not actively participate in an act of worship.  I should know, as I wrongly did just that.  I should have refused to be a friend's groomsman, but I did not.  But it's okay to be a passive witness as there is nothing wrong with the marriage itself.  Plus, if the brother was only baptized Catholic but never raised in the Faith, then he's in the same position as any Protestant baptized as a child.  If he never learned the Faith, I'm not sure the Church treats him as an all-out formal heretic when he does something like marry outside the Church.  Baptism is always Catholic, so if he'd been baptized in a Luthern church he'd be in a similar situation.  *If* the brother was never raised in the Faith.

Bonifacus, you are misinformed.  Please listen to the series on this topic on audiosancto and/or consult a traditional priest for clarification.  A wedding MUST be Catholic in it's form and intent for the marriage to be considered valid (or a special dispensation must be granted).  Catholics are not permitted to attend (even as a "passive witness") non-Catholic cermonies.  If the marriage is not valid, then the couple are living in an adulterous relationship (i.e. because they aren't married).

This explains it very well - http://www.audiosancto.org/sermon/200705...art-1.html
Actually...your wrong. I have consulted 3 different priests on this matter, and gotten the same answer. If 2 non catholic people (not baptized Catholic) get married by JP, or whatever, YES its a valid marriage. they are taking vows, and their vows are valid. If either one of them are baptized Catholic, practicing or not, its invalid.

Thanks!  If the AudioSancto website says otherwise, they're mistaken.  Even non-sacramental, non-Catholic marriages *may* be, under the right circumstances, perfectly valid. 
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