Is It Sinful to Take a Minimalist View of Faith?
#21
Quote:You must abandon yourself and your own will fully, or at least offer yourself up to God to make this attempt, if we are to hope for eternal life. We do so out of love. Is there a less perfect version of this, based on fear of hell? Yes, of course. This is a natural inclination and predisposition placed in our souls by God. It is to lead us to that next phase of actually loving Him and embracing Him for what He is, and not what the lack of Him might mean.

Where does the Church say this is required? To avoid Hell, one must die without the stain of mortal sin.
Reply
#22
(12-13-2009, 07:36 PM)nsper7 Wrote:
Quote:You must abandon yourself and your own will fully, or at least offer yourself up to God to make this attempt, if we are to hope for eternal life. We do so out of love. Is there a less perfect version of this, based on fear of hell? Yes, of course. This is a natural inclination and predisposition placed in our souls by God. It is to lead us to that next phase of actually loving Him and embracing Him for what He is, and not what the lack of Him might mean.

Where does the Church say this is required? To avoid Hell, one must die without the stain of mortal sin.

If you suppose that you can do so without abandoning your own will to God's, you are free to try it.
Reply
#23
[Message deleted by author]
Reply
#24
Yes and how will u die freee from mortal sin?
Reply
#25
Quote:There are those who seem to think that it is sufficient to be saved and that it is not necessary to be a saint. It is clearly not necessary to be a saint who performs miracles and whose sanctity is officially recognized by the Church. To be saved, we must take the way of salvation, which is identical with that of sanctity. There will be only saints in heaven, whether they enter there immediately after death or after purification in purgatory. No one enters heaven unless he has that sanctity which consists in perfect purity of soul. Every sin though it should be venial, must be effaced, and the punishment due to sin must be borne or remitted, in order that a soul may enjoy forever the vision of God, see Him as He sees Himself, and love Him as He loves Himself. Should a soul enter heaven before the total remission of its sins, it could not remain there and it would cast itself into purgatory to be purified.

The interior life of a just man who tends toward God and who already lives by Him is indeed the one thing necessary. To be a saint, neither intellectual culture nor great exterior activity is a requisite; it suffices that we live profoundly by God. This truth is evident in the saints of the early Church; several of those saints were poor people, even slaves. It is evident also in St. Francis, St. Benedict Joseph Labre, in the Cure of Ars, and many others. They all had a deep understanding of these words of our Savior: "For what doth it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his own soul?" (2) If people sacrifice so many things to save the life of the body, which must ultimately die, what should we not sacrifice to save the life of our soul, which is to last forever? Ought not man to love his soul more than his body? "Or what exchange shall a man give for his soul?" our Lord adds. (3) "One thing is necessary," He tells us.(4) To save our soul, one thing alone is necessary: to hear the word of God and to live by it. Therein lies the best part, which will not be taken away from a faithful soul even though it should lose everything else.

- The Three Ages of the Interior Life, Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.

http://www.christianperfection.info/tta2.php#bk1
Reply
#26
Then Jesus said to his disciples: If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For he that will save his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for my sake, shall find it. Matthew, XVI xxiv,xxv.
Reply
#27
Quote:Why should charity thus grow in us? It should grow because the Christian on earth is a traveler, viator, who is advancing spiritually toward God. His spiritual advancement is made by more and more perfect acts of love, "steps of love," as St. Gregory says. We must conclude from this that charity on earth can and should always increase, otherwise the Christian would cease in a sense to be a viator; he would stop before reaching the end of his journey.(2) The way is intended for travelers, not for those who stop en route and sleep. Moreover, we are told in St. Luke (6: 25): "Woe to you that are filled: for you shall hunger," but on the other hand, we read in St. Matthew (5: 6): "Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice, for they shall have their fill." Christ also declared: "If any man thirst, let him come to Me and drink. . . . Out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water." (3)

Since every traveler toward eternity should while on earth grow in charity, not only beginners and proficients, but the perfect ought always to draw nearer to God. And what is more, these last ought to advance toward Him so much the more rapidly as they are nearer to Him and as He draws them more strongly. St. Thomas affirms this when he comments on the words of St. Paul to the Hebrews (10: 25): "Comforting one another, and so much the more as you see the day approaching." St. Thomas writes in his commentary on this verse of the epistle: "Some one might ask why we should thus progress in faith and love. The answer is that the natural (or connatural) movement becomes so much the more rapid as it approaches its term, while it is the inverse for violent movement." (As a matter of fact, we say today that the fall of bodies is uniformly accelerated, while the inverse movement of a stone tossed into the air is uniformly retarded.) "Now," continues St. Thomas, "grace perfects and inclines to good according to the manner of nature. It follows that those who are in the state of grace ought so much the more to grow in charity as they draw near their last end (and are more attracted by it). This is why St. Paul says here: 'Not forsaking our
assembly. . . ; but comforting one another, and so much the more as you see the day approaching,' that is, the end of the journey. 'The night is past, and the day is at hand' (Rom. 13 : 12). 'But the path of the just, as a shining light, goeth forward and increaseth even to perfect day'" (Prov. 4: 18).(4)

http://www.christianperfection.info/tta17.php#bk1
Reply
#28
Quote:Then Jesus said to his disciples: If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For he that will save his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for my sake, shall find it. Matthew, XVI xxiv,xxv.

And how does the Church interpret this? Don't play Protestant on me and start with the self-interpretation of Scripture? What is Church doctrine on this matter?
Reply
#29
Please read this:

http://www.christianperfection.info/tta24.php

In fact I would suggest reading the entire book.
Reply
#30
The Church acknowledges the distinction between Christ's precepts and His counsels. According to the Church, we are Saved by keeping His precepts.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)