Question about greeting
#21
(12-18-2009, 01:29 AM)Rosarium Wrote:
(12-18-2009, 01:08 AM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(12-18-2009, 12:09 AM)legendofheasty Wrote: it happens more places than you think... I personally have attended at least 6 parishes that do it.  My family's former church continues to do it despite a very plain rejection from the people in a poll about it.

Where's Rosarium to remind us all of the futility and inaccuracy of polls?  ;)

My focus of pollish derision is on Internet polls...

Ok. Just thought I'd get your attention.  ;)
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#22
(12-18-2009, 02:03 AM)INPEFESS Wrote: Ok. Just thought I'd get your attention.  ;)

I was trying to sleep...

Really. I was sleeping and woke up for some reason, so I decided to get up for a bit instead of wasting time lying there.

I am not sure why I am so awake now, but maybe it is because of you...
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#23
Tridentinum:

Most Holy Sacrament
875 Our Savior, therefore, when about to depart from this world to the Father, instituted this sacrament in which He poured forth, as it were, the riches of His divine love for men, "making a remembrance of his wonderful works" [Ps. 110:4], and He commanded us in the consuming of it to cherish His "memory" [1 Cor. 11:24], and "to show forth his death until He come" to judge the world [1 Cor. 11:23]. But He wished that this sacrament be received as the spiritual food of souls [Matt. 26:26], by which they may be nourished and strengthened [can. 5], living by the life of Him who said: "He who eateth me, the same also shall live by me" [John 6:58], and as an antidote, whereby we may be freed from daily faults and be preserved from mortal sins. He wished, furthermore, that this be a pledge of our future glory and of everlasting happiness, and thus be a symbol of that one "body" of which He Himself is the "head" [1 Cor. 11:23; Eph. 5:23], and to which He wished us to be united, as members, by the closest bond of faith, hope, and charity, that we might "all speak the same thing and there might be no schisms among us" [cf. 1 Cor. 1:10].
http://www.catecheticsonline.com/SourcesofDogma9.php


Didache

Chapter 14. Christian Assembly on the Lord's Day
But every Lord's day gather yourselves together, and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice may be pure. But let no one that is at variance with his fellow come together with you, until they be reconciled, that your sacrifice may not be profaned. For this is that which was spoken by the Lord: In every place and time offer to me a pure sacrifice; for I am a great King, says the Lord, and my name is wonderful among the nations.
http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/0714.htm

The tradition starts in the past, and not what some people want to force on others.

The initial greetings as an expression that we gather together in the the Name of our Lord,  is not against the spirit of the Holy Mass. I remember from my youth that when people (in a small community) gathered together for Mass, they greeted each other with a silent bow of head. Later the urbanization destroyed this natural gesture expressing that we belong together in Jesus Christ.

At the present time this greeting is against the rubrics, and in most cases the expression of the 'peoples Church' sentiment as it is opposed to the Body of Jesus Christ dogma, but hopefully it will have official form, and will substitute the sign of peace at the height of the Mass.

The problem is, if the togetherness,m the Folks feast takes over, and became more important than the sacrifice of our Lord. 

However the true traditionalism always look for the positive side, and distinguish it from the negatives; trust himself, and does not need to define himself by the denial.
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#24
(12-17-2009, 09:18 PM)BrendanD Wrote: Is this still a trad forum or has the reverent novus ordo crowd totally taken over?

My thoughts exactly...Go build your own forum :bronxcheer:
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#25
(12-18-2009, 08:19 AM)matthew_talbot Wrote:
(12-17-2009, 09:18 PM)BrendanD Wrote: Is this still a trad forum or has the reverent novus ordo crowd totally taken over?

My thoughts exactly...Go build your own forum :bronxcheer:

Jesus Christ explicitly and with very harsh words rejected the elitism of the pharisees. Read Matthew 23

http://www.drbo.org/chapter/47023.htm


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#26
Is it possible to sit somewhere apart from anybody else, so there is no one near you?  When I have to go to a NO Mass and the kiss of peace time arrives, I usually put my head down.  Or since it''s right before the Agnus Dei, I just kneel down.  If you must, just nod politely to the person nearest to you and put your head down.

Christina
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#27
(12-17-2009, 09:18 PM)BrendanD Wrote: Is this still a trad forum or has the reverent novus ordo crowd totally taken over?
husah! lol
relax Trads rule
NO is for tools
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#28
Hello and good morning to all.
Thanks you all for your responses and thanks for the information Texican, it’s very much appreciated.
Have a great day!
:) :pray2:
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#29
(12-18-2009, 02:11 AM)Rosarium Wrote:
(12-18-2009, 02:03 AM)INPEFESS Wrote: Ok. Just thought I'd get your attention.  ;)

I was trying to sleep...

Really. I was sleeping and woke up for some reason, so I decided to get up for a bit instead of wasting time lying there.

I am not sure why I am so awake now, but maybe it is because of you...

Haha! I highly doubt that I'm communicating with you through ESP or some spiritual medium. I hope not anyway...  ;)
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#30
(12-18-2009, 12:37 AM)Mac_Giolla_Bhrighde Wrote: In RCIA, it was explained as a time to put aside any grievances at the beginning of Mass. They claimed that this was the way it was done in the past. More supposed antiquarianism.

I'm not really aware of that. However, that's a valid explanation for how the Sign of Peace came about; that is, a way of putting away one's grievances with his neighbor before approaching God's altar, as Christ said in the gospel. Whatever we think of the common practice of gladhanding everyone around the pews in the NO, there is a remnant of this in the solemn TLM when the ministers embrace each other at the arms. The common medieval practice of sharing the Peace was for everyone to kiss a "pax board".
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