Holocaustianity believers up in arms as Pius XII moves closer to sainthood
#1
The following article appeared in the British newspaper "The Independent", on  Monday, with this photograph shown.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/...46360.html


Anger as Pius moves closer to sainthood

One month before his first synagogue visit, Pope Benedict advances the case of his 'silent' predecessor

By Robert Mickens in Rome


[Image: pious-xii_280223s.jpg]

A leading rabbi accused Pope Benedict XVI of "insensitivity" towards Jews yesterday after the head of the Catholic Church moved his controversial World War II-era predecessor Pope Pius XII a step closer to sainthood.


Pius XII, who served from 1939 to 1958, is regarded by conservative Catholics as one of the greatest of modern popes. But his papacy was also controversial because of his failure to make any protest as millions of Jews were taken to Nazi gas chambers. His supporters claim that silence was necessary for the protection of Catholics around Europe. But the Vatican has infuriated critics by failing to open secret archives relating to his papacy before moving him closer to canonisation.

"This papacy has excelled in diplomatic insensitivity," said Rabbi David Rosen, a member of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and president of the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations. "It has excelled at a lack of consultation and consideration for the ramifications of its actions."

On Saturday Benedict XVI officially declared Pius XII had displayed "heroic virtues" throughout his life and was thus a Christian worthy of imitation – the final hurdle before beatification, which immediately precedes canonisation.

Iris Rosenberg, a spokesman for the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem, added her voice to the growing chorus of Jewish anger.

"Our understanding was that ... the Church was going to wait to take further steps until the relevant Vatican archives were opened, allowing scholars to clarify this controversial period in Church history and Pius's position during the Holocaust," she said. The head of archives, Bishop Sergio Pagano, told reporters last July that it was likely to take another five or six years before the materials could be made accessible to scholars.

"It is regrettable that the Vatican has chosen to act before all the relevant documents are available to researchers," Ms Rosenberg said.

Jewish leaders were also angered that the Vatican chose to announce the acceleration in the process to canonise Pius XII just a month before Benedict XVI is to make his first visit to Rome's major synagogue. So far, the announcement does not appear to have put the 17 January visit in jeopardy. But a source close to Rome's chief rabbi, Dr Riccardo Di Segni, said both the announcement and its timing had "hit a raw nerve".

Dr Di Segni declined to comment, saying that this was an "extremely delicate" issue for Jews in Rome and around the world.

Pius XII was one of 17 people whose canonisation processes moved forward on Saturday. Others included Benedict XVI's most recent predecessor, Pope John Paul II, whose canonisation cause he opened only weeks after his death in April 2005.

Benedict XVI bypassed the five-year waiting period to allow officials to begin the sainthood process for the long-serving Polish pontiff. Speculation among Vatican watchers was that John Paul II could be beatified on 16 October 2010, which would mark the 32nd anniversary of his election to the papacy in 1978.

Before that can happen, a Vatican commission has to verify that a miracle, several of which have been submitted for review, has occurred through the late Pope's intercession.

The issue of the decree recognising Pius XII's heroic virtues yesterday caught many people by surprise, given the sensitive debate surrounding his wartime activities. But Benedict XVI has on numerous occasions shown his desire to push his predecessor's cause forward despite the controversies. In October 2008 he provoked Jewish anger by holding a large public Mass on the 50th anniversary of Pius XII's death. The ceremony came during a Vatican Synod at which the Chief Rabbi of Haifa, She'ar Yashuv Cohen, was an invited guest. The rabbi said he might not have accepted the invitation to address the synod had he been informed that the gathering was to include such an honour for Pius XII.

But despite the strains, the two sides continue to maintain a dialogue, and the next meeting is scheduled to follow Pope Benedict's visit to Rome in January. Rabbi Rosen, who will be involved in that dialogue, said: "Obviously, as much as Pope Benedict is committed to Jewish-Catholic dialogue, we are not the number one priority on his agenda."

Saints in waiting The road to canonisation

Pope John Paul II (1920-2005), whose papacy lasted 27 years, was the first non-Italian pope in 450 years. The Polish pope has been on a fast track to possible canonisation since his funeral, when crowds demanded he be made a saint at once with chants of "Santo subito!" A month after his death, Pope Benedict XVI waived the normal five-year waiting period to kick-start the canonisation process. Since then, more than 250 reports of miracles have poured in, including the claim that he cured a French nun of Parkinson's disease. If the miracle is approved, John Paul II will be beatified – the last step before possible sainthood.

Mother Mary MacKillop (1842-1909), who is in line to become the first-ever Australian saint, devoted her life to educating the poor, setting up schools in the Australian Outback. She co-founded a religious order, the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart, in 1866. It quickly spread across Australia and New Zealand, and later to Peru and Brazil. She eventually led 750 nuns and 117 schools, as well as orphanages and refuges. She was beatified in 1995
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The really disgusting part about this is the deceitful way in which the newspaper used a picture of Pius XII (before he was pope) meeting with a German official when he was papal nuncio there, before the Nazi takeover. A casual observer would probably see the soldiers wearing the same uniforms which the German army continued to use after the Nazis came to power, and assume that then Cardinal Pacelli was being feted by the Nazis. The photograph does include the caption, "Pope Pius XII leaves the presidential palace in Berlin in 1927. The controversial former pontiff was moved a step closer to sainthood on Saturday" , but since most people have trouble with dates and may not be aware that the Nazis didn't come to power until 1933, many might have the wrong impression - which is probably the object of the editors.
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#2
(12-26-2009, 12:42 AM)GregPotemkin Wrote: In October 2008 he provoked Jewish anger by holding a large public Mass on the 50th anniversary of Pius XII's death. The ceremony came during a Vatican Synod at which the Chief Rabbi of Haifa, She'ar Yashuv Cohen, was an invited guest. The rabbi said he might not have accepted the invitation to address the synod had he been informed that the gathering was to include such an honour for Pius XII.

Stupid Jew he should go eat a Hot Dog and shut the hell up. Chainsaw
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#3
Perhaps the newspaper would like to pick our saints and popes. The audacity, really.


http://www.piusxiipope.info/index.htm
Excerpts from "Pope Pius XII - Architect for Peace" by Sister Margherita Marchione (Paulist Press, 2000)

During World War II, 1939—45, and for nearly twenty years after, Pope Pius XII was almost universally regarded as a saintly man, a scholar, a man of peace, a tower of strength, and a compassionate defender and protector of all victims of the war and genocide that had drowned Europe in blood for six years. At the end of the war Western nations paid tribute to his steadfast efforts on behalf of the oppressed. Jews heaped praise on him for his help in their darkest hour and, at his death thirteen years later, they were among the first to express sorrow and gratitude for his solicitude for Jews during the Holocaust.

In the 1960s, however, there began a campaign of vilification against the Pope. The overall effect was to replace the judgment of Pius XII as a great and good man with the judgment of him as a weak, cold, church bureaucrat. Today the media, liberal Catholics, academicians, and editorial commentators with few exceptions accept as unquestionably true the claims made by his detractors - that he lacked courage, human compassion, and a deep sense of moral rectitude. Even when no solid evidence is provided to support such demeaning allegations, he is judged guilty of a sin of omission, such as not having personally raged against Hitler or not having excommunicated all Catholics serving under Hitler.

The accusers' strategy is to rewrite history, to ignore the reality of who had the power and the will to destroy mercilessly from 1933 to 1944 and to pretend that Pius XII possessed some kind of extraordinary ability that no one else in the world had - to make Hitler obey him. Their essential logic is this simple: the Holocaust occurred, millions died, and the mighty Pope refused to exercise his incredible authority. Therefore, he is guilty and shares responsibility for the Nazi crimes. (p. 13)

Still, Pius XII’s critics insist that if he had confronted Hitler directly - publicly excommunicating him and all who supported him - that German Catholics might have risen up in revolt. That is the accusation of the New York Times of March 18. 1998: “The Pope did not encourage Catholics to defy Nazis’ orders.” The idea that the Pope could bring about massive German defiance is completely implausible. Nearly ten years of Nazi rule had proved that anyone, Catholic or Communist, brave enough to defy the Nazis was immediately seized and punished. The Times first endows the Pope with power he did not possess and then demands that he act on that power. Essentially, it is a demand that he should have accepted the sacrifice of innocent people. The only certain result of papal moral rage would have been Hitler’s immoral rage. Further, the historical record on excommunications is clear. They have been notoriously ineffective over the last four or five centuries. Excommunicating Luther did not slow Protestantism nor did it cow Henry VIII nor any subsequent king or emperor out to humble and loot the Vatican. A pontifical excommunication against the Catholic powers of Venice (1606) only succeeded in demonstrating the uselessness of the act. Those who vest Pius XII’s Vatican with the kind of power held for a limited period in the Middle Ages but never demonstrated before or since are being disingenuous. It is unconscionable to malign a brave and good man with such feeble arguments.

In February 1945 Chief Rabbi Isaac Herzog of Palestine stated: “The people of Israel will never forget what His Holiness and his illustrious delegates, inspired by the eternal principles of religion, which form the very foundations of true civilization, are doing for our unfortunate brothers and sisters in the most tragic hour of our history, which is living proof of Divine Providence in this world.”

Jewish leaders worldwide recognized the greatness of Pius XII - the Pope who had saved the lives of so many thousands of people without distinction of race, nationality, or religion. The Jewish Post reported: “It is understandable why the death of Pope Pius XII should have called forth expressions of sincere grief from practically all sections of American Jewry. For there probably was not a single ruler of our generation who did more to help the Jews in their hour of greatest tragedy, during the Nazi occupation of Europe, than the late Pope.”

Today the principal admirers of Pius XII are devout Catholics, those who have studied his life and actions, the Vatican, and John Paul II. Those who have most carefully reviewed every day of his life and every word that he wrote - select members of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints - are so convinced of his worthiness that they are pushing forward his cause for beatification and canonization.


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#4
I dunno, but  to me it seems that most don't know the truth about Pius XII. Rabbi Zoller and Pincheas a Jewish writer/historian wrote books about him and both said he saved the most Jews in WWII. The figured between 750,000 and 1,000,000 people that did not die horribly.Golda Meir, and Simon Wiesenthal eulogised him publicly, but they are dead now, so they are forgotten. You've all heard the coined phrase "the John Paul II generation" which is used to co-note his very long Papacy, we'll I'm a Pius XII generation kid and I hope God allows him a miracle like saving Abe Foxman's life.
tim
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#5
Once you've recklessly opened up the doors of the Church to the Jewish perfidy - ab novi ordinis ecclesia condita, AD 1965 - it will ravage everything from top to bottom leaving nothing behind, only the smell of destruction and apostasy.

Good Lord, deliver us from the Jewish perfidy.
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#6
(12-26-2009, 01:25 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: .

Good Lord, deliver us from the Jewish perfidy.

Amen!
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#7
Don't worry, Pope Benedict is going to the sin-a-gog to tell them we are still friends and they can come and be in Heaven with us even if they hate Jesus.

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#8
(12-27-2009, 02:21 AM)Petertherock Wrote: Don't worry, Pope Benedict is going to the sin-a-gog to tell them we are still friends and they can come and be in Heaven with us even if they hate Jesus.

(sigh) Lets hope it isnt that bad. I am not holding my breath though. Wouldnt it be nice if he just for once stood up in a sin-a-gog(you gave a new word) and preached Christ like St Peter instead of kissy face false ecumenism.
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#9
(12-26-2009, 11:15 AM)timoose Wrote: I dunno, but  to me it seems that most don't know the truth about Pius XII. Rabbi Zoller and Pincheas a Jewish writer/historian wrote books about him and both said he saved the most Jews in WWII. The figured between 750,000 and 1,000,000 people that did not die horribly.Golda Meir, and Simon Wiesenthal eulogised him publicly, but they are dead now, so they are forgotten. You've all heard the coined phrase "the John Paul II generation" which is used to co-note his very long Papacy, we'll I'm a Pius XII generation kid and I hope God allows him a miracle like saving Abe Foxman's life.
tim

If it turned out that Bishop Williamson and the "revisionists" were correct in believing only 300,000 were killed, what would Jewish/Catholic relations look like today knowing for sure that Pius XII saved between 2 and 3 times the number of victims? 
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#10
Quote:Rabbi Rosen, who will be involved in that dialogue, said: "Obviously, as much as Pope Benedict is committed to Jewish-Catholic dialogue, we are not the number one priority on his agenda."

I'm sure he's only half serious with this comment, but given his reaction the above complaint is probably what really has him all upset.  "We have piped to you, and you have not danced: we have lamented, and you have not mourned."

P.S. Hi everybody, this is my first post.  Hi!


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