Saints: Who do you like and how do you relate?
#41
St. Michael - Patron saint of paratroopers, police, etc.  Aloong with my guardian angel, he's worked overtime, just to keep my sorry butt in one piece.
St. Rogellus (and ServusDei, while we're at it ) - Martyr with his disciple, Servus Dei. He was a monk in Spain who was put to death at Cordoba by the Moors for publicly attacking the Muslim faith.  One of my name saints.
St. Joan of Arc - Patroness of soldiers.
St. Raphael - the "medicine of God" and patron of travelers.
St. James - Santiago Matamoros - lots of family history, as well as many other things.
St. Rita - patroness of impossible causes.
St. Jude - patron saint of desperate cases.
St. George - Martyr, parton of Catalunya and chivalrous behavior (protecting women, fighting evil, dependence on faith and might of arms, largesse to the poor)
St. Quodvultdeus - born on his feast day, and i admire his stance against the Arians.

(and about 3, or 4 more, lately) 

All of these saints have helped me in my times of need.  Special mention to Sts. Rita and Jude, when situations were dire.  Of course, my own guardian angel, as well as St. Michael have worked tirelessly, to keep me in one piece, because I'm hard-headed.



(12-31-2009, 08:26 AM)devotedknuckles Wrote: Boondock saints!

Oops!  forgot about them!  Yeah, them too!
Reply
#42
Not to be repetitive but:

St. Francis of Assisi, because he embodies the kind of faith that I'm struggling towards...

St. Thomas Aquinas, because he's both a rationalist and a mystic...

St. Bernard of Clairvaux, because he was willing to kick @$$ when necessary...

St. Teresa of Avila, because she saw major problems and tried to fix them rather than whine about it...
Reply
#43
St. Joseph - The manliest saint ever.  He cared for the Virgin and Christ in total humility and purity.  He's helped me out more than once.
St. Patrick -  He converted the motherland  :shamrock:
St. Pius X - Fought modernism and saw how destructive it would really be.
St. Pio - This one is pretty self-explanatory.  An awesome mystic of the modern era.
St. Aquinas -  I'm a Thomist and God willing my career path will be theology.  He's like... the chief of the Church intellectually and academically.
St. Dismas - The first saint.  He was a sinner with such a beautiful and blessed death.

I should probably start reading more about the saints.  I could find some cool, obscure ones that have a lot of time to intercede for me.
Reply
#44
St Gregory the Great -- patron of teachers
St Thomas Aquinas -- patron of students
St Theresa of Avila -- patroness of people persecuted for their piety
St James the Greater -- patron of knights, laborers and furriers, and the namesake of the school where I am (temporarily) teaching
St Joseph -- patron of husbands and my namesake
Reply
#45
The cult of St. Gertrude the Great really needs to grow.
Reply
#46
(01-11-2010, 07:19 PM)Bellringer Wrote:St Bruno, the total revocation of the world, and the complete commitment to handing things on intact. I take great inspiration in him.

Could you tell us more about this? *curious*
Reply
#47
St. Romuald -- because I have a "quietistic" disposition to interior passivity and prefer solitude; I'm very much attracted to the mystical way of stillness, watchfulness, and contemplation. And I love the Psalms. 

[Image: 266pxsaintromuald.jpg]
Quote:St. Romuald's Brief Rule For Camaldolese Monks

Sit in your cell as in paradise. Put the whole world behind you and forget it. Watch your thoughts like a good fisherman watching for fish. The path you must follow is in the Psalms — never leave it.

If you have just come to the monastery, and in spite of your good will you cannot accomplish what you want, take every opportunity you can to sing the Psalms in your heart and to understand them with your mind.

And if your mind wanders as you read, do not give up; hurry back and apply your mind to the words once more.

Realize above all that you are in God's presence, and stand there with the attitude of one who stands before the emperor.

Empty yourself completely and sit waiting, content with the grace of God, like the chick who tastes nothing and eats nothing but what his mother brings him.

A 'Burning Bush' and 'Father' of Spiritual Wisdom
http://www.ewtn.com/library/MARY/romuald.htm
Reply
#48
(01-12-2010, 09:30 AM)Bellringer Wrote:
(01-11-2010, 08:29 PM)littlerose Wrote:
(01-11-2010, 07:19 PM)Bellringer Wrote:St Bruno, the total revocation of the world, and the complete commitment to handing things on intact. I take great inspiration in him.

Could you tell us more about this? *curious*

Of course. St Bruno established the Carthusians as a direct recreation of the 'communal hermeticism' of the early monastic Christians; however, I guess the trait which I mention is more easily in seen in the Order itself. The order has, following its founder's example I'm sure, kept everything exactly as it has been - they have neither relaxed nor increased the strictness of their statutes, they have kept to using their own order of Mass, their traditions such as wearing the hairshirt, saying the Hail Mary when passing through a room called the 'Ave Maria', and brewing 'Chartreuse liquer' etc. have all been done for hundreds of years. Nothing (much) changes in the Carthusians, just as nothing changes with God.
I love the Carthusians...only order I've ever been interested in joining. Unfortunately,, I do believe the results of Vatican II have pillaged the Carthusian liturgy, though not to the extent of the Roman Rite..I'm still not sure on this though. I can't remember, but I recall hearing a story that Bugnini himself travelled to le Grande Chartreuse to convince them to change, and they resisted, but in futile.

As for my Saints, I have lots, so here it goes, lol
I LOVE St. Bernadette...she's the best. I can almost see her smiling down on me from Heaven...truely a friend
One of my other favourites is St Zdislava...I visited her home when I was in the Czech Republic
St Gemma too...I tried not to like her too much 'cuz a good friend was obsessed with her...but she MADE me be devoted to her...there was no escape.
St Louis IX, of course, being of french heritage and a great lover of the French monarchy...and monarchy in general
St Francis de Sales, love his writings
St Anthony..again, tried not to like him...everyone does, I want my own saint...but he made me, lol
St Thomas Aquinas...helped me so much in high school its unbelievable
Reply
#49
(01-12-2010, 09:38 AM)LausTibiChriste Wrote: I love the Carthusians...only order I've ever been interested in joining. Unfortunately,, I do believe the results of Vatican II have pillaged the Carthusian liturgy, though not to the extent of the Roman Rite..I'm still not sure on this though. I can't remember, but I recall hearing a story that Bugnini himself travelled to le Grande Chartreuse to convince them to change, and they resisted, but in futile.

I've never heard this before and can't (albeit quickly) find anything to support it.  Evidence?
Reply
#50
(01-12-2010, 09:54 AM)WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:
(01-12-2010, 09:38 AM)LausTibiChriste Wrote: I love the Carthusians...only order I've ever been interested in joining. Unfortunately,, I do believe the results of Vatican II have pillaged the Carthusian liturgy, though not to the extent of the Roman Rite..I'm still not sure on this though. I can't remember, but I recall hearing a story that Bugnini himself travelled to le Grande Chartreuse to convince them to change, and they resisted, but in futile.

I've never heard this before and can't (albeit quickly) find anything to support it.  Evidence?

None. I've tried to read as much as I could on the carthusians back in the day...I may be wrong..though I do think any changes made were minor, though I do recall reading the monks at the monastery during VII being "scandalized" by the changes. Who knows, again I could be wrong.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)