Epiphany moved to Jan 3?
#21
Yesterday went to our local NO church and it was the usual "plain vanilla" Mass. Nothing special. In Seattle though (at the North American Martyr's parish) the Bessed chalk has been available for over a week. Wished we could afford the drive up there this Wednesday evening for the Epiphany High Mass.

For those of you that don't know, North American Martyr's parish is an FSSP parish being hosted (for a fee) at St. Alphonsus in the north part of Seattle (Ballard).
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#22
This thread and the 'holy chalk' reminded me of how the priest and deacon in the Ukrainian parish I grew up in used to come around to all the houses of the parishoners and bless them... all the rooms would get sprinkled with holy water while the priest (and singing deacon) would walk around the house.. my mom would make us clean from the day after Christmas to make sure everything was perfect for Father's visit... we'd set out a special cruicifix on the coffee table ontop of a linen cloth that we kept only for the house blessing and a dish for holy water...  they just don't do stuff like that anymore... :(
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#23
(01-04-2010, 02:49 PM)catholicschoolmom Wrote: This thread and the 'holy chalk' reminded me of how the priest and deacon in the Ukrainian parish I grew up in used to come around to all the houses of the parishoners and bless them... all the rooms would get sprinkled with holy water while the priest (and singing deacon) would walk around the house.. my mom would make us clean from the day after Christmas to make sure everything was perfect for Father's visit... we'd set out a special cruicifix on the coffee table ontop of a linen cloth that we kept only for the house blessing and a dish for holy water...   they just don't do stuff like that anymore... :(

When I was a child we could not go swimming until after the priests had blessed the lake in the Spring and we all had little oval scapular medals sewn into out bathing suits.  We were horrified at the rumors that protestant parents allowed their children to swim without scapulars!
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#24
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I'm a cradle Catholic and I've never heard of the chalk custom. January 6 is my birthday and maybe I was too busy eating cake. 

Hey, mine too! Happy early birthday, fellow Epiphany baby! 

I'm all excited we're going to Mass on my birthday, and get to see the blessing of the chalk! Though we'll miss the lengthy Epiphany holy water blessing, as that's being done at the vigil Mass.
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#25
Here is the USCCB Calendar

http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/current/2010cal.pdf

Epiphany (in the US) is set to the closest Sunday, this year to January 3rd  . see the day at p.12, January 6th is weekday

Naturally this is for the New Mass and Liturgy of Hours only, for the Traditional Mass and Office January 3rd  was the Most Holy Name of Jesus this year, and Epiphany will be January 6th.

In 1570, as St Pius V set it, January 3rd was the Octava day of St John Apostle.

It is all natural that the Calendar of the Church is changing

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#26
(01-04-2010, 03:28 PM)goggleeyes Wrote:
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I'm a cradle Catholic and I've never heard of the chalk custom. January 6 is my birthday and maybe I was too busy eating cake. 

Hey, mine too! Happy early birthday, fellow Epiphany baby! 

I'm all excited we're going to Mass on my birthday, and get to see the blessing of the chalk! Though we'll miss the lengthy Epiphany holy water blessing, as that's being done at the vigil Mass.

Yeah! Happy birthday to you too, wise man (or in our case, wise women)!  :birthday: I'll be attending Mass too, and afterwards the Handel's Messiah Concert at our church that night. What a wonderful birthday present, and a grande finale to the Christmas season!

- Lisa
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#27
(01-04-2010, 04:00 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(01-04-2010, 03:28 PM)goggleeyes Wrote:
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I'm a cradle Catholic and I've never heard of the chalk custom. January 6 is my birthday and maybe I was too busy eating cake. 

Hey, mine too! Happy early birthday, fellow Epiphany baby! 

I'm all excited we're going to Mass on my birthday, and get to see the blessing of the chalk! Though we'll miss the lengthy Epiphany holy water blessing, as that's being done at the vigil Mass.

Yeah! Happy birthday to you too, wise man (or in our case, wise women)!  :birthday: I'll be attending Mass too, and afterwards the Handel's Messiah Concert at our church that night. What a wonderful birthday present, and a grande finale to the Christmas season!

- Lisa
That would be awesome!!!! I wish our church had something like that.
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#28
(01-04-2010, 04:23 PM)CanadianCatholic Wrote:
(01-04-2010, 04:00 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(01-04-2010, 03:28 PM)goggleeyes Wrote:
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:I'm a cradle Catholic and I've never heard of the chalk custom. January 6 is my birthday and maybe I was too busy eating cake. 

Hey, mine too! Happy early birthday, fellow Epiphany baby! 

I'm all excited we're going to Mass on my birthday, and get to see the blessing of the chalk! Though we'll miss the lengthy Epiphany holy water blessing, as that's being done at the vigil Mass.

Yeah! Happy birthday to you too, wise man (or in our case, wise women)!  :birthday: I'll be attending Mass too, and afterwards the Handel's Messiah Concert at our church that night. What a wonderful birthday present, and a grande finale to the Christmas season!

- Lisa
That would be awesome!!!! I wish our church had something like that.

We have a famous choir, and our choir director also happens to be the conductor of the Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra. We are very lucky. The whole ensemble will be there Wednesday night! Alleluia!  :)
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#29
Thats amazing! what a beautiful birthday your going to have, enjoy every bit of it!
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#30
JCCMADD Wrote:When they  deformed the calendar in the  late 60 s early  70 this is one of the many loony changes the church change  along with ordinary time sundays too please the hertics.

I quite like the new kalendar. It eliminated many of the useless thematic repetitions which is found in the old kalendar (for instance, Septuagesima, Sexagesima and Quinquagesima - a time of anticipation for Lent, Lent itself already being a period of vigil). Eh, to each his own.

How does "Ordinary Time," as the season of Tempus per annum is poorly translated in the United States, "please the hertics?"

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